INTRODUCTION TO T...
Follow
Find tag "transportation"
1.5K views | +3 today
INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIAL SCIENCES DIGITAL TEXTBOOK(PSYCHOLOGY-ECONOMICS-SOCIOLOGY):MIKE BUSARELLO
“In the business world, the rearview mirror is always clearer than the windshield.” Warren Buffet
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Most Cyclists Are Working-Class Immigrants, Not Hipsters

Most Cyclists Are Working-Class Immigrants, Not Hipsters | INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIAL SCIENCES DIGITAL TEXTBOOK(PSYCHOLOGY-ECONOMICS-SOCIOLOGY):MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"Urban planners are noticing a cultural gap between bike advocates and others who bike. Planners see a particular type of cyclist: a working-class person – usually a minority and often a recent immigrant – riding to work on whatever type of bike he can get his hands on. Those cyclists are men and women for whom biking isn’t an environmental cause or a response to an urban trend but a means of transportation that’s cheaper than a car and faster than walking."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 31, 2015 5:21 PM

Those that fight for bike lanes are not representative of all the cyclists.  These invisible cyclists are show that the cycling is an economic strategy for many of the urban poor, just as it can be a social statement for wealthy bike riders.


Tags: mobility, transportation, socioeconomic, class, planning.

Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from Haak's APHG
Scoop.it!

19th Century Ship Routes

19th Century Ship Routes | INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIAL SCIENCES DIGITAL TEXTBOOK(PSYCHOLOGY-ECONOMICS-SOCIOLOGY):MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"Ben Schmidt, assistant professor of history at Northeastern University, has visualized the routes of 19th Century ships using publicly available data set from NOAA (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration). The resulting image is a hauntingly beautiful image that outlines the continents and highlights the trade winds. It shows major ports, and even makes a strong visual case for the need for the Panama and Suez Canals."


Via Seth Dixon, Dean Haakenson
more...
Tracey M Benson's curator insight, March 10, 2014 4:29 PM

Beautiful data visualisation of 19th century ships using publicly available data set from NOAA (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration).

Brian Altonen's curator insight, March 10, 2014 6:21 PM

Lessons in GIS and Medical GIS - Examples of applications. Various Resources at hand.

Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Where ‘speeding’ is legal: A map of maximum limits across the U.S.

Where ‘speeding’ is legal: A map of maximum limits across the U.S. | INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIAL SCIENCES DIGITAL TEXTBOOK(PSYCHOLOGY-ECONOMICS-SOCIOLOGY):MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
An unconventional look at American roads, mapped by their speed limits.

 

The above map, from MetricMaps, illustrates that abrupt division using local speed limit data.  That map shows the maximum local speed limit for any local roads or highways in each Census block group in the U.S. The nationwide contrasts are striking, but so are the local ones: Zoom in to an individual city like Los Angeles, and the darker arteries effectively outline highways.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Alex Vielman's curator insight, September 20, 2015 10:36 PM

When looking at this map, before looking at the actual index of the colors that determine the speeds, I could already tell which areas would have a higher speed level and which ones had a lower speed level. Looking at the map, the mountain region had higher speed levels. I believe this is accurate because there isn't much going on in this areas. There is tons of land and direct roads that lead to other states. These states, like Wyoming or Montana, aren't really tourist attractions. In the New England area, one could see that the speed levels are lower and I would assume it would be because there are more people in this area. There is not a lot of land here for agriculture. I would say this map seems pretty accurate. 

Anneliese Sjogren's curator insight, September 29, 2015 8:15 PM

I think that this map is really interesting. It shows that the rural areas have less limits, as compared to more urban areas that are more limited. I like how the major U.S. cities have boxes with close up views so you can get a better look at these differences.

Raymond Dolloff's curator insight, October 12, 2015 2:13 PM

Speeding in America can lead to some people having road rage because they are in a hurry. However, by looking at the map of speed limits in the United States, the area that would probably see less cases of road rage is in the Central and Plains states that have a speed limit of over 75 miles per hour. This will also help reduce people who speed because they are in a rush to get from point a to point b. In areas such as Rhode Island, where the speed limits reach up to 65 miles per hour, people tend to rush and get angry with people who are going below the speed limit and lead to the need for speed to calm themselves down. Thus, it also includes a higher risk for getting a speeding ticket which will be expensive.

Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from AP Human Geography
Scoop.it!

Children and Space

"In just a few generations, we have tightly restricted American kids' freedom to roam, play, and become self-sufficient. The percentage of children walking and bicycling to school has plummeted from almost 50 percent in 1969 to about 13 percent today. Although distance from school is often cited as the main barrier to walking and bicycling, many families still drive when schools are close to home. According to the Safe Routes to School National Partnership, driving accounts for about half of school trips between 1/4- and 1/2-mile long — which in most cases shouldn't take kids much more than 10 minutes to walk."


Via Seth Dixon, Christopher L. Story
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 24, 2015 4:34 PM

This is a controversial topic and I certainly don't have all the answers. The free range parenting is a new to to our cultural conversations about parenting, but the ideas are anything but new. Most free range advocates want their children to have the rights to roam about their neighborhoods that others today would see as parental neglect. Many argue that as automobiles have become more prominent in urban design, it has come at the expense of children's ability to be in public unsupervised (yes, children used to be encouraged to go out to play in the streets). Children don't know their own neighborhoods as well anymore and this isn't just about architecture and design. Culturally our communal notions of proper parenting and child safety have shifted in the United States, but they are also very different around the world.  

 

Questions to Ponder: How is parenting shaped by cultural norms? What are the spatial implications of changing parenting strategies? What are the factors that shape your opinion about the 'proper' range for kids to roam unsupervised?  


Tags: housing, placeneighborhood, perspective, cultural norms, culture, transportation, planningspatial.

asli telli's curator insight, August 15, 2015 1:34 AM

Also applies to unfortunate Turkey w/her recent urban transformation wave...

Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from HMHS History
Scoop.it!

Kids Who Get Driven Everywhere Don't Know Where They're Going

Kids Who Get Driven Everywhere Don't Know Where They're Going | INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIAL SCIENCES DIGITAL TEXTBOOK(PSYCHOLOGY-ECONOMICS-SOCIOLOGY):MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
A new study suggests vehicular travel affects children's ability to navigate their neighborhood and connect to their community.

 

We learn about the places around us by exploring.  Literally our mental map is formed by making choices (in part through trial and error) and that process strengthens our spatial perception of the neighborhood.  Research is showing that kids with a 'windshield perspective' from being driven everywhere are not able to draw as accurate maps as children for who walk and bike their neighborhood.  The built environment and the transportation infrastructure in place play a role in developing spatial thinking skills for young minds. 

 

This is a compelling article with some important implications.  What are the ramifications for geographers?  City planners? Educators?  Families moving to a new neighborhood?   


Via Seth Dixon, Michael Miller
more...
Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 11, 2013 10:52 AM

We may not realize it but when we take our kids out on drives to run errands or if we move to a different area we are ruining their understanding of the area they live in. Children often have a hard time of figuring out where they are if they constantly in a car looking at new places. This can cause them to lack a sense of direction and maybe have trouble remembering streets or landmarks near their homes. 

Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from Geography
Scoop.it!

If Roads Were Like Bike Lanes

If Roads Were Like Bike Lanes | INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIAL SCIENCES DIGITAL TEXTBOOK(PSYCHOLOGY-ECONOMICS-SOCIOLOGY):MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
For those brief moments that you happen to be in a bike lane, biking in the city is wonderful. But it always seems that bike lanes end before they even begin, just like a summer romance or a slice ...

Via Seth Dixon, Luke Gray
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 10, 2014 9:14 AM

It's just a joke, but good comedy has a nugget of truth that shines a light on the inconsistencies of the human experience.  This really highlights the priorities given to various modes of transportation as we allocate public space for them. 


Tags: transportation, planning.

Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

GIS for home buyers

GIS for home buyers | INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIAL SCIENCES DIGITAL TEXTBOOK(PSYCHOLOGY-ECONOMICS-SOCIOLOGY):MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Whoa, check out Trulia Local - A visual way to explore crime, schools, home prices, and local data.

 

The map above was generated to display the areas within a 30 minute commute of Rhode Island College in Providence.  This site generates commuting maps and other layers that are especially pertinent for home buyers---schools, crime stats, property values and local amenities.  This is GIS data brought to the real estate shopping community, but consider this a project in the making.  One of the best exercises to get to know a place holistically is to shop for housing and make some locational analysis decisions.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Greenest states to own an electric car

Greenest states to own an electric car | INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIAL SCIENCES DIGITAL TEXTBOOK(PSYCHOLOGY-ECONOMICS-SOCIOLOGY):MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
The carbon emissions produced by electric cars vary depending on how a given region generates its electricity.

 

If a consumer is trying to assess the environmental impact of their automotive/transportation practices, that answer may vary according to wher they live; the type of driving, the regions energy source and local air quality all need to be factored in.  Geography always matters. 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

How Walkable Streets can Boost the Economy

How Walkable Streets can Boost the Economy | INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIAL SCIENCES DIGITAL TEXTBOOK(PSYCHOLOGY-ECONOMICS-SOCIOLOGY):MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Walkable streets are not only fun and exciting places to be, they are also profitable. Research has found that by prioritising pedestrians through making streets more walkable, both property values and shop footfall increase.

 

This article is a nice primer for a discussion on the importance of urban planning for local politics and economics.   


Via Lauren Moss, Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

The 5, the 101, the 405: Why Southern Californians Love Saying 'the' Before Freeway Numbers

The 5, the 101, the 405: Why Southern Californians Love Saying 'the' Before Freeway Numbers | INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIAL SCIENCES DIGITAL TEXTBOOK(PSYCHOLOGY-ECONOMICS-SOCIOLOGY):MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"How did Southern Californians come to treat their highway route numbers as if they were proper names?"


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 12, 2015 3:56 PM

I can't say how delighted this native Southern Californian was to read this (and especially to rediscover the classic SNL skit).  Despite living in Rhode Island, I retain this linguistic quirk that I subconsciously learned as a kid growing up in Southern California.  This is a shibboleth of mine, a distinctive pronunciation, word choice, or manner of speaking that reveals something about the speaker (such as place of origin, ethnic background, or group membership).     

Questions to Ponder: What are other shibboleths that you know?  Do you use any? 


Tags: California, languagetransportation, toponyms.

Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from Esaili's Geography
Scoop.it!

Every Job in America, Mapped

Every Job in America, Mapped | INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIAL SCIENCES DIGITAL TEXTBOOK(PSYCHOLOGY-ECONOMICS-SOCIOLOGY):MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Are you one of the millions of Americans opting into "job sprawl" over a short commute?

 

Before you dig in to “Where are the Jobs?: Employment in America 2010,” it may help to note that each dot represents a single job—and you can tell what kind of job it is because of its color. Manufacturing and trade jobs are red; professional services jobs are blue; healthcare, education, and government jobs are green; and retail, hospitality, and other service jobs are yellow. You won’t find any dots for federal jobs (no available data), and Massachusetts is missing entirely—the only state to opt out of reporting its employment trends. The end result is a highly detailed map that gives viewers a quick summary of how many and what types of jobs are a part of the economy.

 

Tags: economic, labor, USA, transportation, industry.


Via Seth Dixon, Jodi Esaili
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

How one German millennial chose to live on trains rather than pay rent

How one German millennial chose to live on trains rather than pay rent | INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIAL SCIENCES DIGITAL TEXTBOOK(PSYCHOLOGY-ECONOMICS-SOCIOLOGY):MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"When others get off the train to finally go home, Leonie Müller stays behind. That's because she already is home: The train is her apartment, and she says she likes it that way. She bought a subscription that allows her to board every train in the country free. Now, Müller washes her hair in the train bathroom and writes her college papers while traveling at a speed of up to 190 mph. She says that she enjoys the liberty she has experienced since she gave up her apartment."

 

Tags: mobility, transportation, housing, popular culture, Europe, Germany. 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Mark Hathaway's curator insight, October 9, 2015 9:46 AM

This is no question that living on a train is a radical decision to make. It is a direct challenge to the idea that you are suppose to settle into one particular area. While I doubt that this specific phenomenon will catch on, our society is becoming more mobile.  People are becoming less tied down to one specific area. The Millennial generation is changing many of the previous social norms. The Millennial generation is waiting longer than any previous generation to marry and start a family. Many are even questioning the institution of marriage itself.  Members of the older generations, will decry these changes. This is a familiar cycle that occurs through out history. The Older generation always decries the changes instituted by the Younger generation.

Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Expanding the Panama Canal

Expanding the Panama Canal | INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIAL SCIENCES DIGITAL TEXTBOOK(PSYCHOLOGY-ECONOMICS-SOCIOLOGY):MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"In 2006, Panamanians approved a referendum to expand the Panama Canal, doubling its capacity and allowing far larger ships to transit the 100-year-old waterway between the Atlantic and Pacific. Work began in 2007 to raise the capacity of Gatun Lake and build two new sets of locks, which would accommodate ships carrying up to 14,000 containers of freight, tripling the size limit. Sixteen massive steel gates, weighing an average of 3,100 tons each, were built in Italy and shipped to Panama to be installed in the new locks. Eight years and $5.2 billion later, the expansion project is nearing completion. The initial stages of flooding the canals have begun and the projected opening date has been set for April of 2016."


Tag: Panama, images, transportation, globalization, diffusion, industry, economic.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Lindley Amarantos's curator insight, August 6, 2015 3:54 PM

This gallery of 29 images is filled with great teaching images.

Chris Costa's curator insight, September 23, 2015 2:00 PM

I think that much of Central America is presented in Western media as an extremely violent, backwards region, where narcotics and other "hidden" markets dominate the nation's social, cultural, and political structures. Although there is some truth to this, this rendition not only exaggerates the problems these nations face, but help to reinforce negative stereotypes of the region commonly held by many Americans. A story of progress- such as this story of the Panama canal- is widely ignored, which is a shame. The Panama Canal is one of the most crucial waterways in the world, and expanding it will undoubtedly help the Panamanian economy. Although it initially served as the ultimate symbol of colonialism- the United States caused a war and unrecognizably altered the geography of the region to complete the project- it today serves as a symbol of progress in a region of the world widely ignored. It will be interesting to see the impacts this expansion has on trade in the region, as well as the local geography.

Benjamin Jackson's curator insight, December 13, 2015 8:31 AM

the expanding of the panama canal is a major event, as everything from flow of trade to the maximum size of ships will be impacted by this improvement. the Iowa class of us battleship was two feet then the canal, specifically so they could go through if they needed to.

Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from education
Scoop.it!

Global Shipping Traffic Visualized

As stated in this NPR article: "The video shows satellite tracking of routes superimposed over Google Earth. It focuses on some of the main choke points for international shipping, such as the Strait of Malacca on the southern tip of Malaysia, Suez Canal, the Strait of Gibraltar and Panama Canal. It's a good reminder that about 90 percent of all the goods traded globally spend at least some of their transit time on a ship."

 

Tags: transportation, globalization, diffusion, industry, economic, mapping, video, visualization.


Via Seth Dixon, LEONARDO WILD
more...
Mediterranean Cruise Advice's curator insight, February 25, 2015 6:46 AM

This is amazing to watch.

Matt Davidson's curator insight, February 26, 2015 4:52 AM

A great visual on shipping - Geographies of Interconnections (year 9)

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, October 10, 2015 6:24 PM

An important aspect of global trade links and connections. 

Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Public Transit and Density

Public Transit and Density | INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIAL SCIENCES DIGITAL TEXTBOOK(PSYCHOLOGY-ECONOMICS-SOCIOLOGY):MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 14, 2013 10:25 PM

This image is an excellent visualization to use when teaching about density, public transportation and urban planning. 


Questions to Ponder: How is this a persuasive image?  Do you argee with the argument that the planning office is making? Are there something important factors that this image ignores?


Tags: transportation, urban, planning, density, sustainability, unit 7 cities.

Imran Ahmed Khan's comment, January 17, 2013 3:44 PM
Good picture! It defines the growth of the city that impact on urbanization rate, public health, socioeconomic environment. It also tell us that if we reduce vehicles on the road more space and clean environment may we get, that reduce motality and morbadity of several disease especially lung diseases.
Lauren Jacquez's curator insight, April 8, 2013 9:31 PM

What are the benefits for each?  Drawbacks? You decide!

Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Landscapes of Oil

Landscapes of Oil | INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIAL SCIENCES DIGITAL TEXTBOOK(PSYCHOLOGY-ECONOMICS-SOCIOLOGY):MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Socks is a online magazine about Media, Art, Architecture, Cities, Design, Technology.

 

Our society is obviously heavily dependent on oil.  Yet we often don't see the environmental impacts of our collective oil consumption on the landscape because the negative impacts have been spatially separated away from oil consumers.  This is an excellent compilation of photos by Edward Burtynsky that makes the connection between oil consumption and changes to both the physical and cultural landscapes explicit.  For more images by this artist, see: http://www.edwardburtynsky.com/ ;


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Joseph Nadeem's comment, October 2, 2012 2:10 AM
Welcome to Renaissance Education Foundation (REF)
www.reduf.org
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CFLFlMHBxj0
http://www.facebook.com/posted.php?id=160491263966987
http://www.causes.com/causes/413232-renaissance-education-foundation-ref/about?m=7f992ebd
http://ref-community-lifting-program.blogspot.com/
https://profiles.google.com/u/0/Renaissance.edu.Foundation/about?tab=qh#Renaissance.edu.Foundation/about
Renaissance Education Foundation (REF) is determined to help our poor brothers and sisters in their dreams of a better future. The REF program aims for educational excellence for low income families.
REF helps young people who, after completing basic schooling, have no possibility to continue their education. REF helps students to continue with the traditional education as well as computer training.
REF also, helps these students stand on their own by adding computer training to their qualifications.
The in demand fields are currently petrochemical, aeronautics, agriculture/dairy, banking, clothing, and educational-based industries. Our computer based technology training provides expertise in all of these fields. Therefore, computer education has become a prerequisite for becoming a successful and member of society.
REF was established in 1996 as a Not-for-Profit Organization, and is sponsored by a team of dedicated young educators and professionals. REF is located in Youhanabad Lahore Pakistan. Youhanabad is a rural area of Lahore Pakistan, in an area that is largely Christian.
Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Containerization Shaped Globalization

Sometimes a single unlikely idea can have massive impact across the world. Sir Harold Evans, the author of They Made America, describes how frustration drove...

 

The economies of scale that globalization depends on, relies on logistics and transportation networks that can handle this high-volume.  In a word, the container, as mundane as it may seem, facilitated the era within which we live today. 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, December 7, 2014 5:26 PM

I always enjoyed TED videos. What really struck me was the opening sentence of the video, "everything is everywhere these days." This is so true in so many ways. The video uses different examples that you can find in different stores from places all over the world. How many things can you could in your bedroom that says "Made in China" or some other place other than the US? This is very common as we all know. Products and goods come from all over the world and even over seas. This is a process that we call globalization. However, the video introduces a process called containerization. This process saves an ample amount of time for the workers. The process was a success. "shrinking the world and enlarging human choice."

Michael Mazo's curator insight, December 10, 2014 7:48 PM

Globalization has connected the world in such a way that we hadn't thought possible. This idea has created rising economies all over the world and has made transport of goods and services move faster and continues to increase this rate with advances in technology. Containerization is a staple of globalization and without it, none of these products would be able to get from country to country. In essence it has developed the world of import and exports. To add to this success, globalization has also created jobs and communities which revolve heavily around the transport of goods. It saves time by using massive containers to move goods and it creates opportunities in places where it had not been possible before. 

Ricardo Cabeza de Vaca's curator insight, May 27, 2015 3:45 AM

I believe this video is very interesting. It tells us that everything we have today is thanks to globalization and the reason we have it so fast is because of shipping containers! In the video it told me that before my time it was impossible to get swordfish from Japan or cheeses from France, but now thanks to globalization it is all possible. Globalization is even behind the reason how our phones were made!