INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIAL SCIENCES DIGITAL TEXTBOOK(PSYCHOLOGY-ECONOMICS-SOCIOLOGY):MIKE BUSARELLO
1.7K views | +0 today
Follow
INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIAL SCIENCES DIGITAL TEXTBOOK(PSYCHOLOGY-ECONOMICS-SOCIOLOGY):MIKE BUSARELLO
“In the business world, the rearview mirror is always clearer than the windshield.” Warren Buffet
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Where ‘speeding’ is legal: A map of maximum limits across the U.S.

Where ‘speeding’ is legal: A map of maximum limits across the U.S. | INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIAL SCIENCES DIGITAL TEXTBOOK(PSYCHOLOGY-ECONOMICS-SOCIOLOGY):MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
An unconventional look at American roads, mapped by their speed limits.

 

The above map, from MetricMaps, illustrates that abrupt division using local speed limit data.  That map shows the maximum local speed limit for any local roads or highways in each Census block group in the U.S. The nationwide contrasts are striking, but so are the local ones: Zoom in to an individual city like Los Angeles, and the darker arteries effectively outline highways.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 2, 2015 10:12 PM

This map shows some stark contrast between urban and rural land use patterns--it also shows urban networks that are designed to compression time and space.   

 

Tags: transportation, planningspatial, scale, Time-Space Compression.

Alex Vielman's curator insight, September 20, 2015 10:36 PM

When looking at this map, before looking at the actual index of the colors that determine the speeds, I could already tell which areas would have a higher speed level and which ones had a lower speed level. Looking at the map, the mountain region had higher speed levels. I believe this is accurate because there isn't much going on in this areas. There is tons of land and direct roads that lead to other states. These states, like Wyoming or Montana, aren't really tourist attractions. In the New England area, one could see that the speed levels are lower and I would assume it would be because there are more people in this area. There is not a lot of land here for agriculture. I would say this map seems pretty accurate. 

Raymond Dolloff's curator insight, October 12, 2015 2:13 PM

Speeding in America can lead to some people having road rage because they are in a hurry. However, by looking at the map of speed limits in the United States, the area that would probably see less cases of road rage is in the Central and Plains states that have a speed limit of over 75 miles per hour. This will also help reduce people who speed because they are in a rush to get from point a to point b. In areas such as Rhode Island, where the speed limits reach up to 65 miles per hour, people tend to rush and get angry with people who are going below the speed limit and lead to the need for speed to calm themselves down. Thus, it also includes a higher risk for getting a speeding ticket which will be expensive.

Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

These two maps show the shocking inequality in Baltimore

These two maps show the shocking inequality in Baltimore | INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIAL SCIENCES DIGITAL TEXTBOOK(PSYCHOLOGY-ECONOMICS-SOCIOLOGY):MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
How vacant houses trace the boundaries of Baltimore's black neighborhoods.

 

The map on the left shows one very tiny dot for each person living in Baltimore. White people are blue dots, blacks are green, Asians are red and Hispanics yellow.The map on the right shows the locations of Baltimore City's 15,928 vacant buildings. Slide between the two maps and you'll immediately notice that the wedge of white Baltimore, jutting down from the Northwest to the city center, is largely free of vacant buildings. But in the black neighborhoods on either side, empty buildings are endemic.

 

Tags: neighborhood, gentrification, urban, place, economic, race, poverty, spatial, housing.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, May 1, 2015 9:37 AM

Unit 7

Lauren Quincy's curator insight, May 24, 2015 9:14 PM

Unit 7: Cities and Urban Land Use

 

This article is about Sandtown, Baltimore and its shift into a disamenity sector. It explains how this neighborhood, mainly housed by blacks, had a high percentage of vacant houses. The article says that this neighborhood is overrun with poverty, war on drugs and gangs and has the more residents in jail than any other neighborhood. This shows the changing demographics of the city of Baltimore.

 

This relates to unit 7 because it covers the topic of disamenity sectors and changing demographics. It shows reasons for the high levels of poverty and abandoned housing. It also shows the racial spatial distribution of the neighborhood and its correlation to housing and development.  

Lydia Tsao's curator insight, May 26, 2015 1:46 AM

This article left me heart broken. The African American community in Baltimore is stuck in a deep poverty cycle, and it cannot seem to escape its impoverished past. Even now, the poverty in the area seems to just be getting worse. The problems of income disparity lead to more problems than just economic; they lead to social and political problems. Social unrest and injustice occurs as a result of the modern white flight. This article arose as a result of the death of Freddie Gray, whose death demonstrates a significant social issue that needs to be addressed: police brutality and the criminal targeting of the African American community. His death stems from the tremendously amounts of disparity in the city. Promoting investment in the inner city would definitely help alleviate the poverty in the area. The problem is getting people to invest.

Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY
Scoop.it!

Quiz: Can you name a food just by looking at where it comes from?

Quiz: Can you name a food just by looking at where it comes from? | INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIAL SCIENCES DIGITAL TEXTBOOK(PSYCHOLOGY-ECONOMICS-SOCIOLOGY):MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
I map the food, you tell me what it is.

Via Seth Dixon, FCHSAPGEO
more...
Gabriel Olson's curator insight, February 13, 2015 2:59 PM

We ought to know something about where our food comes from...

Eden Eaves's curator insight, March 24, 2015 1:04 AM

Unit 5

Some  of these maps are easy to guess, such as cotton being grown in the south, but what about others like pigs being raised in the mid-west and North Carolina??? We are so used to having only to make a quick stop at the nearest grocery store to grab our weekly essentials that we don't always think about where it naturally comes from. Also preservatives have come so far as to keep things fresh for long periods of time that where it originates is not a problem because it can be shipped in a refrigerated truck with still time left for it to sit in your fridge for a few days. 

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, March 16, 3:34 PM

This 12 question quiz is a great way to introduce students to spatial patterns of agricultural products in the United States.  Sometimes just knowing regional stereotypes can be helpful, but being able to make an educated guess about where an agricultural product is comes from requires a basic understanding of economic and climate patterns.  This quiz is a good way to test that knowledge and introduce them to these spatial patterns.    

 

Tags: triviaspatial, regions, foodeconomic, food production, agriculture.

Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Why everyone should be able to read a map

Why everyone should be able to read a map | INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIAL SCIENCES DIGITAL TEXTBOOK(PSYCHOLOGY-ECONOMICS-SOCIOLOGY):MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
New research suggests that map reading is a dying skill in the age of the smartphone. Perish the thought, says Rob Cowen

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Lindley Amarantos's curator insight, September 5, 2014 9:17 AM

this can explain why it is important to NOT always rely on technology. It is good to keep your brain active and the spatial awareness that comes with reading a map is invaluable

Dolors Cantacorps's curator insight, September 5, 2014 3:13 PM

Practiquem-ho a classe doncs!

Richard Thomas's curator insight, July 30, 2015 10:52 PM

Despite the gendered overtones of the article (that it's important for men to learn to read a map), this is some good advice, regardless of gender.  The vocabulary and concepts of maps can strengthen spatial cognition and geography awareness.  While GPS technology can help us in a pinch, relying primarily on a system that does not engage our navigation skills will weaken our ability to perform these functions.  While it intuitively makes sense, that the 'mental muscles' would atrophy when not used, it is a reminder that an overuse of geospatial technologies can be intellectually counterproductive.  So break out a trusty ol' map, but more importantly, be a part of the spatial decision-making process. 


Tags: mapping, spatial, technology, education.

Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Exploring the Brain’s GPS

Exploring the Brain’s GPS | INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIAL SCIENCES DIGITAL TEXTBOOK(PSYCHOLOGY-ECONOMICS-SOCIOLOGY):MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
May-Britt and Edvard I. Moser are exploring the way the brain records and remembers movement in space, which they speculate may be the basis of all memory.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 30, 2013 4:26 PM

This is more neuroscience than it is geography, but it is incredibly relevant to geographers and spatial analysis.  These Norwegian neuroscientists are charting the brain to understand how we remember where we have been, where we are and how we navigate through space.  They are primarily mapping out the brains of rats, but much of what they’ve discovered appears to hold for all mammals.  There are certain cells that are only active when you are in certain places.  These cells interact as a network in a grid pattern,  forming a very regular hexagonal pattern (central place theory!?!).  These ‘place cells’ or ‘grid cells’ store information about distances and directions and are crucial to navigation.  Read more about it in this article or watch this 6-minute video

 

Tags: spatial, mental maps.

  

Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Market Segmentation

Market Segmentation | INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIAL SCIENCES DIGITAL TEXTBOOK(PSYCHOLOGY-ECONOMICS-SOCIOLOGY):MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Nielsen Prizm is a tool used by companies to analyze their customers spending habits, lifestyle choices and spatial patterns.  Using their Zip Code Look Up feature, you can search any zip code to g...

 

This is an interesting glimpse into how market research analysts view neighborhoods, geography and spatial analysis.  This economic and cultural data has a wide range of uses (albeit with some serious limitations). 

 

Tags: socioeconomic, neighborhood, place, economic, consumption, spatial, mapping. 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
CIM Academy's curator insight, July 17, 2015 5:13 AM

Segmentation is a key element in strategic planning. This article discusses the importance of market segmentation and provides some key insights. 

Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

How to Make a Human Arabesque

This film and photographic experiment set out to prove The Power of X by attempting an Ideas Worth Doing for TEDxSUMMIT. The project fused architecture, danc...

 

This is a great demonstration of spatial thinking extending far beyond 'just' the discipline of geography.  Using spatial thinking, we can create truly breath-taking works of art.  To see more about this on the TED-ED site, see: http://ed.ted.com/on/AOxez5KX  


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 28, 2013 3:38 PM

 

This is a great demonstration of spatial thinking extending far beyond 'just' the discipline of geography.  Using spatial thinking, we can create truly breath-taking works of art.  Read more about this on the TED-ED site.

Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Why Place Matters in a Global Virtual World

Why Place Matters in a Global Virtual World | INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIAL SCIENCES DIGITAL TEXTBOOK(PSYCHOLOGY-ECONOMICS-SOCIOLOGY):MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

All Business is Local: Why Place Matters More Than Ever in a Global Virtual World.

 

Yes there are processes of globalization that are reshaping many dynamics, but as John Quelch and Katherine Jocz argue in their book coming out next month, this is an age of semi-globalization.  Even the world's best global brands are highly attuned to local tastes, cultures and patterns.  'Company bosses who focus too much on glamorous global strategy and the big picture risk getting burned in a world where the vast majority of business transactions are local' because of the difficulties in getting the local part of the strategy to resonate with consumers.   

 

How is the world still incredibly local?  What type of jobs are 'non-outsourceable?'


Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Interactive Map: The Economy Where You Live

Interactive Map: The Economy Where You Live | INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIAL SCIENCES DIGITAL TEXTBOOK(PSYCHOLOGY-ECONOMICS-SOCIOLOGY):MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
The fallout from the recession has cut deeply into the housing security, employment and income of many Americans. But some parts of the country are clearly faring better than others.

 

Do your own local and regional analysis of household incomes, unemployment and foreclosure rates.  What patterns surprise you?  What geographic factors explain the economic situation?     


Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from AP Human Geography
Scoop.it!

Children and Space

"In just a few generations, we have tightly restricted American kids' freedom to roam, play, and become self-sufficient. The percentage of children walking and bicycling to school has plummeted from almost 50 percent in 1969 to about 13 percent today. Although distance from school is often cited as the main barrier to walking and bicycling, many families still drive when schools are close to home. According to the Safe Routes to School National Partnership, driving accounts for about half of school trips between 1/4- and 1/2-mile long — which in most cases shouldn't take kids much more than 10 minutes to walk."


Via Seth Dixon, Christopher L. Story
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 24, 2015 4:34 PM

This is a controversial topic and I certainly don't have all the answers. The free range parenting is a new to to our cultural conversations about parenting, but the ideas are anything but new. Most free range advocates want their children to have the rights to roam about their neighborhoods that others today would see as parental neglect. Many argue that as automobiles have become more prominent in urban design, it has come at the expense of children's ability to be in public unsupervised (yes, children used to be encouraged to go out to play in the streets). Children don't know their own neighborhoods as well anymore and this isn't just about architecture and design. Culturally our communal notions of proper parenting and child safety have shifted in the United States, but they are also very different around the world.  

 

Questions to Ponder: How is parenting shaped by cultural norms? What are the spatial implications of changing parenting strategies? What are the factors that shape your opinion about the 'proper' range for kids to roam unsupervised?  


Tags: housing, placeneighborhood, perspective, cultural norms, culture, transportation, planningspatial.

asli telli's curator insight, August 15, 2015 1:34 AM

Also applies to unfortunate Turkey w/her recent urban transformation wave...

Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from HMHS History
Scoop.it!

Kids Who Get Driven Everywhere Don't Know Where They're Going

Kids Who Get Driven Everywhere Don't Know Where They're Going | INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIAL SCIENCES DIGITAL TEXTBOOK(PSYCHOLOGY-ECONOMICS-SOCIOLOGY):MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
A new study suggests vehicular travel affects children's ability to navigate their neighborhood and connect to their community.

 

We learn about the places around us by exploring.  Literally our mental map is formed by making choices (in part through trial and error) and that process strengthens our spatial perception of the neighborhood.  Research is showing that kids with a 'windshield perspective' from being driven everywhere are not able to draw as accurate maps as children for who walk and bike their neighborhood.  The built environment and the transportation infrastructure in place play a role in developing spatial thinking skills for young minds. 

 

This is a compelling article with some important implications.  What are the ramifications for geographers?  City planners? Educators?  Families moving to a new neighborhood?   


Via Seth Dixon, Michael Miller
more...
Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 11, 2013 10:52 AM

We may not realize it but when we take our kids out on drives to run errands or if we move to a different area we are ruining their understanding of the area they live in. Children often have a hard time of figuring out where they are if they constantly in a car looking at new places. This can cause them to lack a sense of direction and maybe have trouble remembering streets or landmarks near their homes. 

Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from Esaili's Geography
Scoop.it!

Spatial Design

"How much does size really matter? Judging by this tiny home in France, not a whole lot -- as long as the space is functional.

On the seventh floor of an apartment building in Paris, there's an 86-square-foot apartment complete with a bed, kitchen, bathroom, table and chairs, closet, bathroom and storage space." --HPost


Via Seth Dixon, Jodi Esaili
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 11, 2014 7:26 PM

Space in a home matters, but the functionality of that space is critical.  Geography is about spatial thinking, and this video promotes a different type of spatial thinking, but one that still will help geographic thought.  As our metropolitan areas get more and more crowded, planning of this type might become increasingly common.  What advantages to you see in interior design that seek s to maximize space?  What are some drawbacks to a design such as this?


Tags: spatialdensity, urbanism, housing.

John Nieuwendyk's curator insight, November 23, 2014 10:16 PM

With an ever-growing urban population spatial design is important in maintaining functionality, efficiency and orderliness. The apartment building in Paris is especially interesting. It is practical and functions well enough to where a person can live comfortably in a markedly small but efficient space.   

Ryann Pinnegar's curator insight, July 6, 2015 3:02 AM

This tiny home is amazing! It is like the setting for a futuristic story.

Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Why do competitors open their stores next to one another?

 

"Why are all the gas stations, cafes and restaurants in one crowded spot? As two competitive cousins vie for ice-cream-selling domination on one small beach, discover how game theory and the Nash Equilibrium inform these retail hotspots."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
CT Blake's curator insight, August 29, 2014 8:03 PM

For use in understanding the placement of businesses in Human Geography.

Luke Walker's curator insight, October 3, 2014 3:34 AM

A great video lesson that gets at the heart of location theory and competition.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, June 1, 2015 10:11 AM

unit 6

Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Exploring the Brain’s GPS

Exploring the Brain’s GPS | INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIAL SCIENCES DIGITAL TEXTBOOK(PSYCHOLOGY-ECONOMICS-SOCIOLOGY):MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
May-Britt and Edvard I. Moser are exploring the way the brain records and remembers movement in space, which they speculate may be the basis of all memory.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 30, 2013 4:26 PM

This is more neuroscience than it is geography, but it is incredibly relevant to geographers and spatial analysis.  These Norwegian neuroscientists are charting the brain to understand how we remember where we have been, where we are and how we navigate through space.  They are primarily mapping out the brains of rats, but much of what they’ve discovered appears to hold for all mammals.  There are certain cells that are only active when you are in certain places.  These cells interact as a network in a grid pattern,  forming a very regular hexagonal pattern (central place theory!?!).  These ‘place cells’ or ‘grid cells’ store information about distances and directions and are crucial to navigation.  Read more about it in this article or watch this 6-minute video

 

Tags: spatial, mental maps.

  

Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Spatial Analysis of the NBA Finals

Spatial Analysis of the NBA Finals | INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIAL SCIENCES DIGITAL TEXTBOOK(PSYCHOLOGY-ECONOMICS-SOCIOLOGY):MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Navigate court maps and view analysis of every shot taken over the ’11-'12 season for the Miami Heat and Oklahoma City Thunder.

 

Who said geography has nothing to do with sports?!?  While there are many cultural and economic impacts on sport preference and prevalence, let's discuss the geography of the hardwood and a spatial analysis of the shot selections between the two teams.  Clearly 'place matters' to many NBA players as their success on the court depends on finding their preferred spots within the flow of offense.     


Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks
Scoop.it!

Furniture designed to Maximize Space

Amazing design and stylish furniture...

 

While I typically focus on the geospatial, this is an excellent example of (non-geo) spatial thinking.  The design in this furniture reminds me of the work of urban planners--mixed use areas to satisfy the needs of many populations. 

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

The distribution of wealth in America

The distribution of wealth in America | INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIAL SCIENCES DIGITAL TEXTBOOK(PSYCHOLOGY-ECONOMICS-SOCIOLOGY):MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

More than 50 percent of ZIP Codes in the United States have an above average percentage of households living at or below the poverty line.  What are the spatial factors that lead to a concentration of wealth in particular places?  What economic, political and cultural factors play a role in the process of places amassing more wealth or of creating persistant poverty? 


Via Nicholas Goubert, Seth Dixon
more...
Anhony DeSimone's curator insight, December 18, 2013 10:33 PM

The maps in this article indicate where the wealth is and is staying through out the United States. In some regions or areas of the United States have more wealth than others. The States or areas that are at the poverty level or sub par to the rich areas are higher in percentage. this occurs for many reasons, but one reason is evident that the wealth of a nation tends to stay in one area until another area becomes more wealthy.