INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIAL SCIENCES DIGITAL TEXTBOOK(PSYCHOLOGY-ECONOMICS-SOCIOLOGY):MIKE BUSARELLO
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INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIAL SCIENCES DIGITAL TEXTBOOK(PSYCHOLOGY-ECONOMICS-SOCIOLOGY):MIKE BUSARELLO
“In the business world, the rearview mirror is always clearer than the windshield.” Warren Buffet
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A New Map for America

A New Map for America | INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIAL SCIENCES DIGITAL TEXTBOOK(PSYCHOLOGY-ECONOMICS-SOCIOLOGY):MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
The 50-state model is holding the country back. It needs a new system, built around urban corridors.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 15, 4:51 PM

This is a great article to get students thinking about the spatial network of cities, not just the internal structure of particular cities based on some models. In this article, Parag Khanna argues that the United States is stuck in "an antiquated political structure of 50 distinct states" that isn't aligned with growing urban regions that shape our internal and external economic linkages. He proposed that our infrastruture should strengthen these networks that cut across state boundaries more so than it currently does. "Federal policy should refocus on help these nascent [urban] archipelagos prosper, and helping other emerge...collectively forming a lattice of productive metro-regions efficently through better highways, railways, and fiber-optic cables: a United City-States of America." 

 

Questions to Ponder: What political obstacles would this proposal receive?  Demographically, who would support/oppose this type of restructuring?  How would this impact the economic geographies of the United States? 

 

Tagsop-edregions, urban, transportationeconomic, planning.

 

Jean-Simon Venne's curator insight, April 28, 8:13 AM
We should build a similar map for technology innovaton
Character Minutes's curator insight, July 1, 7:13 PM
Great way to encourage critical thinking in students: what would this impact? Adv & Disadvantages? Compare 50 states vs this model? How would new plan be implemented? 

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Not All English is the Same

Not All English is the Same | INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIAL SCIENCES DIGITAL TEXTBOOK(PSYCHOLOGY-ECONOMICS-SOCIOLOGY):MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"22 Maps That Show How Americans Speak English Totally Differently From Each Other"


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Lena Minassian's curator insight, January 27, 2015 5:58 PM

This article was actually funny and interesting. You do not really pay attention to the pronunciation of words just because we are surrounded by the same people who say a particular word the same way. Many individuals in the US are in for a culture shock if they leave their respected homes. One word that you have grown up with may be a completely different word in another area. We tend to not focus a lot of attention on the smaller details like this type of grammar and pronunciation so this caught my eye because it was interesting to think about and realize how you say words compared to the rest of the United States.

Louis Mazza's curator insight, January 28, 2015 11:53 AM

to me this is not so shocking but definitely entertaining. i mean between my family their is pronunciation differences. some say tomato others say toma`to right? not all English is the same is a concept that makes perfect sense to me. in other countries such as Italy, a person from the north cannot understand a person from the south because they speak in different dialects. perhaps it has to their with their location, or job types. but it holds true that different parts of a country can speak the same language in different ways. 

Kevin Cournoyer's curator insight, April 8, 2015 3:04 PM

I've seen this collection of maps a number of times before, but they are just as interesting and informative every time I look at them. It's really a fun exercise in seeing what phrases you use or how you pronounce certain words as opposed to the rest of the country. As a Rhode Islander, the bubbler/water fountain divide was of particular interest to me. I also found it funny that I have the vaguely Western/Midwestern tendency of calling "rotaries" (or what are traditionally called rotaries in my area), "roundabouts". This is especially curious to me, because I generally tend to think of that term as a British one. Could this possibly mean that a lot of British immigrants settled in the Western/Midwestern United States? Or am I just mistaken and buying into a poorly informed stereotype about British people?

 

Whatever the case, these maps are very informative and say a lot about the linguistic differences that occur even within one country. Now granted, the United States is a large country, so there is bound to be a good amount of variation. But it's still fascinating to me just how much variety there can be. The fact that when traveling, your use or pronunciation of a certain word or phrase can immediately identify you as an out-of-towner is very interesting. This is yet another example of the importance of doing your own research in order to avoid making incorrect assumptions. Just because all of the people within a geographic border may live in the same country, it does not mean that their dialects or colloquialisms are all the same. It does not even necessarily mean that they speak the same language. Different immigrant groups (because almost no country is impervious to immigration) settle in different areas and this ends up contributing (in part) to the different dialects and expressions that one finds within geographic borders. 

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Gender equity in sports

Gender equity in sports | INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIAL SCIENCES DIGITAL TEXTBOOK(PSYCHOLOGY-ECONOMICS-SOCIOLOGY):MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"Yesterday the United States Women’s Soccer Team defeated Japan 5-2 in the FIFA Women’s World Cup Final in Vancouver, claiming their third world title. The event was watched by soccer fans around the country, and was called a “ratings knockout” but couldn't come close to those drawn by men’s soccer in Brazil last summer...while some states have made great strides in reducing this gender gap, others still have great inequity that needs to be addressed to effectively celebrate and give potential American female athletes the opportunities they deserve to succeed."

 

Tags: sport, gender, popular culture, mapping, regions, the South, culture.


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Alexander Yakovlev's comment, July 8, 2015 10:08 AM
This article talks about how not many men are interested in watching women’s sport. I think gender inequity is a major problem in general, not only in sports. Police officers are mostly men as well, as well as many high ranked jobs. We just need to keep working on it as a nation and think that the women who are being discriminated are women of our nation.
Rob Duke's comment, July 9, 2015 1:42 AM
Alex, I worked for a Chief that allowed job sharing, so that women officers who wanted to do so could share a job with both getting benefits, but only working part-time in order to have more time with family. It was a great way to improve the ratio of male to female officers.
Cultural Infusion's curator insight, August 24, 2015 10:13 PM

An important issue of our time is the gap between women and men not only in pay and workplace equality but sports and athletics also. With such a huge presence of many strong, dominate female sporting teams, the question needs to be asked, what more can we do to give these women the recognition and respect of which they deserve?

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Quiz: Can you name a food just by looking at where it comes from?

Quiz: Can you name a food just by looking at where it comes from? | INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIAL SCIENCES DIGITAL TEXTBOOK(PSYCHOLOGY-ECONOMICS-SOCIOLOGY):MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
I map the food, you tell me what it is.

Via Seth Dixon, FCHSAPGEO
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Gabriel Olson's curator insight, February 13, 2015 2:59 PM

We ought to know something about where our food comes from...

Eden Eaves's curator insight, March 24, 2015 1:04 AM

Unit 5

Some  of these maps are easy to guess, such as cotton being grown in the south, but what about others like pigs being raised in the mid-west and North Carolina??? We are so used to having only to make a quick stop at the nearest grocery store to grab our weekly essentials that we don't always think about where it naturally comes from. Also preservatives have come so far as to keep things fresh for long periods of time that where it originates is not a problem because it can be shipped in a refrigerated truck with still time left for it to sit in your fridge for a few days. 

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, March 16, 3:34 PM

This 12 question quiz is a great way to introduce students to spatial patterns of agricultural products in the United States.  Sometimes just knowing regional stereotypes can be helpful, but being able to make an educated guess about where an agricultural product is comes from requires a basic understanding of economic and climate patterns.  This quiz is a good way to test that knowledge and introduce them to these spatial patterns.    

 

Tags: triviaspatial, regions, foodeconomic, food production, agriculture.

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The Geography of Language

"Over the course of human history, thousands of languages have developed from what was once a much smaller number. How did we end up with so many? And how do we keep track of them all? Alex Gendler explains how linguists group languages into language families, demonstrating how these linguistic trees give us crucial insights into the past."


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Woodstock School's curator insight, June 4, 2014 6:05 AM

A good teaching tool for explaining the diversity of languages.

Adilson Camacho's curator insight, June 12, 2014 9:38 PM

Geografia Cultural

Chris Plummer's curator insight, January 11, 2015 11:46 PM

Summary- This video explains how so many languages came to be and why. By the early existence of human there was a such smaller variety of languages. Tribes that spoke one language would often split in search of new recourses. Searching tribe would develop in many new different ways than the original tribe. new foods, land, and other elements created a radically different language than the original. 

 

Insight- In unit 3 we study language as a big element of out chapter. One key question in chapter 6 was why are languages distributed the way they are. It is obvious from the video that languages are distributed they way they are is because of the breaking up from people which forced people to develop differently thus creating a different language. As this process continues, there become more and more branches of a language family.  

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Understanding "Eat Local"

Understanding "Eat Local" | INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIAL SCIENCES DIGITAL TEXTBOOK(PSYCHOLOGY-ECONOMICS-SOCIOLOGY):MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

This Oregon-based infographic succinctly summarizes the local food movement and taps into the cultural ethos that permeates the growing number of consumers that are demanding more home-grown products.


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Which Regions Produce the Most NFL Players?

Which Regions Produce the Most NFL Players? | INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIAL SCIENCES DIGITAL TEXTBOOK(PSYCHOLOGY-ECONOMICS-SOCIOLOGY):MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Despite Friday Night Lights portrayals, there's a lot more geographic diversity in NFL prospects than you might think.

 

Happy NFL draft weekend!  As I'm sure you were asking yourself, I was thinking, "where do NFL players come from?" Are there strong spatial patterns of this distribution?  How do cultural forces impact the prevalence of a particular sport in a specific region?  It's not as skewed to the South a you might think. 


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What Percent Are You?

What Percent Are You? | INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIAL SCIENCES DIGITAL TEXTBOOK(PSYCHOLOGY-ECONOMICS-SOCIOLOGY):MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
See how your household income ranks in 344 zones across the country.

 

It isn't always about how much you make, but purchasing power, cost of living and local economic situations show us that one number doesn't tell the story of the national economy.  This interactive feature compares household incomes with how they would compare with other regions of the country.  


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There’s a Philly Sign Language Accent

There’s a Philly Sign Language Accent | INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIAL SCIENCES DIGITAL TEXTBOOK(PSYCHOLOGY-ECONOMICS-SOCIOLOGY):MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"Speech with a drawl, twang, clipped consonants, broad vowels, slurred words or extra diphthongs might give away that the speaker is from the American South, Boston, the Midwest or elsewhere. The spice that a certain region may lend to spoken language can even be strong enough to flavor non-audible language as well. Indeed, American Sign Language (ASL) has its own accents. And like its audible counterpart, one of the strongest regional accents in ASL is that of Philadelphia residents, reports Nina Porzucki for PRI."

 

Tags: language, culture, regions.

Via Seth Dixon, Michael Miller
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Abdulsalam Al-Mukradi's curator insight, February 14, 7:16 PM

Accents are varies but we really have to care about the language itself. Universities play a major role in avoiding accents in languages. They try to use one accent that follow the dictionary phonetics.

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How Not to Be Ignorant About the World

How much do you know about the world? Hans Rosling, with his famous charts of global population, health and income data (and an extra-extra-long pointer), demonstrates that you have a high statistical chance of being quite wrong about what you think you know. Play along with his audience quiz — then, from Hans’ son Ola, learn 4 ways to quickly get less ignorant.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 17, 2015 5:01 PM

Our preconceived notions of places, as well as some of the dominant narratives about regions, can cloud our understanding about the world today.  This video is a good introduction to the Ignorance Project which shows how personal bias, outdated world views and news bias collectively make combating global ignorance difficult.   However, the end of the video shows some good rules of thumb to have a more fact-based world view.  


Tagsstatistics, placeregions, media, models, gapminderdevelopment, perspective.

Adilson Camacho's curator insight, September 18, 2015 11:32 PM

adicionar sua visão ...

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Teaching Cultural Empathy: Stereotypes, World Views and Cultural Difference

Teaching Cultural Empathy: Stereotypes, World Views and Cultural Difference | INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIAL SCIENCES DIGITAL TEXTBOOK(PSYCHOLOGY-ECONOMICS-SOCIOLOGY):MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"I am torn about how to teach these two ideas about cultures and societies all around the world:

People and cultures are different all over the world.People and cultures are the same all over the world.

These points may seem like a contradiction, but when put into proper context they teach important truths about culture."


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Avery Liardon's curator insight, March 23, 2015 9:48 PM

Unit 3:

Shines insight on stereotypes that are commonly used throughout the world. Reading this article really made me think about stereotypes that are so commonly used they are considered acceptable. It's a ridiculous idea to think that all people under a culture act and behave the same way. 

Emily Coats's curator insight, March 24, 2015 12:06 PM

UNIT 3 CULTURE

This article is written to compare and contrast various ways to teach young school children about global cultures. On one hand, we can relate all cultures to each other, due to their common goals and views. For example, all families around the world aim to do what's best for each other, love and cherish one another, and try their hardest to succeed economically. On the other hand, cultures are extremely different around the world, with different music, clothing, and underlying views on life. We can continue to say that popular culture has diffused so greatly, with advanced technologies and means of transportation, so it has influenced and homogenized our landscape quite a bit. Folk culture is obviously still a powerful force, but popular culture does have some effects around the world. I believe that children need to understand the importance of maintaining diversity thy preserving folk culture but they also need to acknowledge the pros and cons of the global diffusion of popular culture and how it connects us at a global scale. 

Danielle Smith's curator insight, April 12, 2015 12:21 AM

I think Teaching Cultural Empathy: Stereotypes, World Views and Cultural Difference is a helpful article for teachers to read. This article considers ideas I constantly come back to, whilst collecting resources and ideas for teaching students about cultural diversity and identity. How do I teach students, that ‘people and cultures are different all over the world’ (Dixon, 2015, April 2), but also the same?

Dixon suggests that we need to teach that people and cultures worldwide are the SAME and DIFFERENT simultaneously.  In this way, students can appreciate the rich diversity of cultures and societies, whilst at the same time learning values of humanity and empathy, which unite us all.

 

I believe by recognising and appreciating the rich cultures of students in the classroom, we can explore and learn about cultural diversity in an honest, rich and non-stereotypical way and allow students to feel valued at the same time. In addition, as students know each other, this helps them relate to ‘people from other places, who speak other languages’ and follow different religions to their own (Dixon, 2015, April 2). Furthermore, this should help increase intercultural understanding in the classroom by developing a ‘socially cohesive’ environment that ‘respects, and appreciates cultural, social and religious diversity’ (MYCEETA, p. 7).

 

References

Dixon, S. (2015, April 2). Teaching cultural empathy: Stereotypes, world views and cultural difference. National Geographic. Retrieved April 7, 2015, http: http://blog.education.nationalgeographic.com/2015/02/04/teaching-cultural-empathy-stereotypes-world-views-and-cultural-difference/

 

Ministerial Council on Education, Employment, Training, and Youth Affairs. (2008, December). Melbourne declaration on educational goals for young Australians. Melbourne: Author. 

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The Geography of Small Talk

The Geography of Small Talk | INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIAL SCIENCES DIGITAL TEXTBOOK(PSYCHOLOGY-ECONOMICS-SOCIOLOGY):MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Surprising alternatives to "so what do you do?"—from New Orleans to New York.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 23, 2014 7:48 PM

The types of questions that you ask when you are meeting someone new for the first time has some regional variations but there is much more to the geography of small talk than that as see in this 4 minute video.  People want to understand your cultural, ethnic, socioeconomic context by asking spatial questions about where you are from.  Identity and place are tightly woven and these neighborhood questions are almost invitations to share much more personal information, as if to ask, "how do you fit in this world?"  When you are being introduced to someone, what are the questions that you ask, and what type of information are you hoping to get?  Each person has their own little geography that has profoundly shaped who they are---so what’s your story? 


Tags: language, regions, folk cultures, communityplace, neighborhood.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, April 24, 2014 9:43 AM

unit 2-3

Mr Steven Newman's curator insight, April 24, 2014 2:33 PM
Love this scoop from Seth Dixon. A nice way to help kids understand sense of place .
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Media and Culture--Perspective and Bias

"Religious scholar Reza Aslan took some serious issue on CNN Monday night with Bill Maher‘s commentary about Islamic violence and oppression. Maher ended his show last Friday by going after liberals for being silent about the violence and oppression that goes on in Muslim nations. Aslan said on CNN that Maher’s arguments are just very unsophisticated.  He said these 'facile arguments' might sound good, but not all Muslim nations are the same. Aslan explained that female mutilation is an African problem, not a Muslim one, and there are Muslim-majority nations where women are treated better and there are even female leaders."


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Mark Hathaway's curator insight, October 23, 2015 5:58 AM

The media plays a substantial role in enhancing stereotypes about Muslims. In order to simplify an issue, the media often lumps groups of people together and identifies them as sharing one set of beliefs. In a constant twenty four hour news environment ,nuance is often sacrificed for a quick ratings driven story. The media is often appealing to the lowest common denominator. The media should make a better effort to explain the differences between each Muslim nation. The Middle East is a complex area, and it deserves complex coverage.

Alex Vielman's curator insight, November 23, 2015 3:01 PM

This video is a clear insight on how the Media depicts the people from around the world. Reza Aslan set these tv anchors on CNN in its place after they proclaimed that all Muslim countries are the same, that all Muslims are the same. This information is false and is informing people from around the world about the Middle East region. The problem is not the countries, or the religions, the simple problem is the people who support terrorism from this region and believe in stronger violent attacks to prove that they are strong. ISIS and all the other rebel groups coming from these nations are the problem. One must understand, that there are people who are suffering from these rebel groups in there own homes that want nothing to do with it. Syrians are looking for a way out from the violence and corruption in these states. To say, all Muslims are a problem is a really big misconception to the culture to people watching these videos around the world. It is important that people like Reza Aslan speak up and educate and give the right facts on the media. 

Benjamin Jackson's curator insight, December 13, 2015 7:33 PM

yes, some Muslim countries have been lead by women. how many woman governors have there been. Texas is the size of Iraq. scale matters, and if all Muslim countries were merged they would never elect a woman as their leader, if one even ran and survived. the us has at least let them run.