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INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIAL SCIENCES DIGITAL TEXTBOOK(PSYCHOLOGY-ECONOMICS-SOCIOLOGY):MIKE BUSARELLO
“In the business world, the rearview mirror is always clearer than the windshield.” Warren Buffet
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Teaching Cultural Empathy: Stereotypes, World Views and Cultural Difference

Teaching Cultural Empathy: Stereotypes, World Views and Cultural Difference | INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIAL SCIENCES DIGITAL TEXTBOOK(PSYCHOLOGY-ECONOMICS-SOCIOLOGY):MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"I am torn about how to teach these two ideas about cultures and societies all around the world:

People and cultures are different all over the world.People and cultures are the same all over the world.

These points may seem like a contradiction, but when put into proper context they teach important truths about culture."


Via Seth Dixon
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Avery Liardon's curator insight, March 23, 9:48 PM

Unit 3:

Shines insight on stereotypes that are commonly used throughout the world. Reading this article really made me think about stereotypes that are so commonly used they are considered acceptable. It's a ridiculous idea to think that all people under a culture act and behave the same way. 

Emily Coats's curator insight, March 24, 12:06 PM

UNIT 3 CULTURE

This article is written to compare and contrast various ways to teach young school children about global cultures. On one hand, we can relate all cultures to each other, due to their common goals and views. For example, all families around the world aim to do what's best for each other, love and cherish one another, and try their hardest to succeed economically. On the other hand, cultures are extremely different around the world, with different music, clothing, and underlying views on life. We can continue to say that popular culture has diffused so greatly, with advanced technologies and means of transportation, so it has influenced and homogenized our landscape quite a bit. Folk culture is obviously still a powerful force, but popular culture does have some effects around the world. I believe that children need to understand the importance of maintaining diversity thy preserving folk culture but they also need to acknowledge the pros and cons of the global diffusion of popular culture and how it connects us at a global scale. 

Danielle Smith's curator insight, April 12, 12:21 AM

I think Teaching Cultural Empathy: Stereotypes, World Views and Cultural Difference is a helpful article for teachers to read. This article considers ideas I constantly come back to, whilst collecting resources and ideas for teaching students about cultural diversity and identity. How do I teach students, that ‘people and cultures are different all over the world’ (Dixon, 2015, April 2), but also the same?

Dixon suggests that we need to teach that people and cultures worldwide are the SAME and DIFFERENT simultaneously.  In this way, students can appreciate the rich diversity of cultures and societies, whilst at the same time learning values of humanity and empathy, which unite us all.

 

I believe by recognising and appreciating the rich cultures of students in the classroom, we can explore and learn about cultural diversity in an honest, rich and non-stereotypical way and allow students to feel valued at the same time. In addition, as students know each other, this helps them relate to ‘people from other places, who speak other languages’ and follow different religions to their own (Dixon, 2015, April 2). Furthermore, this should help increase intercultural understanding in the classroom by developing a ‘socially cohesive’ environment that ‘respects, and appreciates cultural, social and religious diversity’ (MYCEETA, p. 7).

 

References

Dixon, S. (2015, April 2). Teaching cultural empathy: Stereotypes, world views and cultural difference. National Geographic. Retrieved April 7, 2015, http: http://blog.education.nationalgeographic.com/2015/02/04/teaching-cultural-empathy-stereotypes-world-views-and-cultural-difference/

 

Ministerial Council on Education, Employment, Training, and Youth Affairs. (2008, December). Melbourne declaration on educational goals for young Australians. Melbourne: Author. 

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The Geography of Small Talk

The Geography of Small Talk | INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIAL SCIENCES DIGITAL TEXTBOOK(PSYCHOLOGY-ECONOMICS-SOCIOLOGY):MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Surprising alternatives to "so what do you do?"—from New Orleans to New York.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 23, 2014 7:48 PM

The types of questions that you ask when you are meeting someone new for the first time has some regional variations but there is much more to the geography of small talk than that as see in this 4 minute video.  People want to understand your cultural, ethnic, socioeconomic context by asking spatial questions about where you are from.  Identity and place are tightly woven and these neighborhood questions are almost invitations to share much more personal information, as if to ask, "how do you fit in this world?"  When you are being introduced to someone, what are the questions that you ask, and what type of information are you hoping to get?  Each person has their own little geography that has profoundly shaped who they are---so what’s your story? 


Tags: language, regions, folk cultures, communityplace, neighborhood.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, April 24, 2014 9:43 AM

unit 2-3

Mr Steven Newman's curator insight, April 24, 2014 2:33 PM
Love this scoop from Seth Dixon. A nice way to help kids understand sense of place .
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Media and Culture--Perspective and Bias

"Religious scholar Reza Aslan took some serious issue on CNN Monday night with Bill Maher‘s commentary about Islamic violence and oppression. Maher ended his show last Friday by going after liberals for being silent about the violence and oppression that goes on in Muslim nations. Aslan said on CNN that Maher’s arguments are just very unsophisticated.  He said these 'facile arguments' might sound good, but not all Muslim nations are the same. Aslan explained that female mutilation is an African problem, not a Muslim one, and there are Muslim-majority nations where women are treated better and there are even female leaders."


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Kaitlin Young's curator insight, November 22, 2014 5:42 PM

Over-generalization in regards to people and places can lead to discrimination, stereotypes, and misunderstandings. Media in the United States is notorious for generalizing entire regions of the world instead of expressing the differences between these places. While a people of a region may have some similar characteristics, it does not mean that that entire region is the same. The media tends to use the term "Muslim Nations" in order to speak about areas of the Middle East where violent, radical Islamic groups raise terror. The term "Muslim Nations" has been made to spark fear, anger, and hatred in American households, but "Muslim Nations"  are not the ones that people should be scared of. Countries with an Islamic majority are not just typified by their religion, and they definitely should not be typified by the media's portrayal of Islamic insurgencies. 

Hector Alonzo's curator insight, December 14, 2014 8:29 PM

This video discusses how the majority of Western society groups Muslim countries and assumes that they are alike and does not take the time to distinguish just how different they really are. As the Religious scholar Reza Aslan states, it is usually easier to use Umbrella terms to classify one group. Aslan also says that in many Muslim countries woman are treated fairly and it is countries such as Saudi Arabia that give the world the idea that that how woman are treated in all Muslim countries and that couldn't be further from the truth.

Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 16, 2014 1:27 AM

This video is fantastic as Reza Aslan, a man educated on the basis of Islam is able to debunk falsehoods held by many. Quite a few people in this country hold on to very narrow minded and incorrect images of Islam. This whole situation is compounded as many media outlets also are poorly informed and pass these false statements off as fact. Education is the real key to religious tolerance, if you are able to look at a situation with a clear head and understand multiple sides of an argument you become far better prepared to speak and think about the topic. I've shown this video to numerous people as it serves as an amazing wake up call for some.  

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The World is all about Money

The World is all about Money | INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIAL SCIENCES DIGITAL TEXTBOOK(PSYCHOLOGY-ECONOMICS-SOCIOLOGY):MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"A world map used by Erik Penser Bankaktiebolag to visualize economic markets. The map contains approximately 3,000 coins and every continent is built out of its countries’ currencies. Used in various medias during 2009."  If you look closely you will notice that the coins are from the region that they are cartographically representing.  To see more by this artist, visit: http://www.penser.se/


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USA National Gas Price Map

USA National Gas Price Map | INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIAL SCIENCES DIGITAL TEXTBOOK(PSYCHOLOGY-ECONOMICS-SOCIOLOGY):MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

This visualization of gas prices by county in the United States is timely as high gas prices are not only impacting pocketbooks, but are also becoming political taking points for presidential candidates and this issue may drive policy.  This shows the regional variations in prices (so sorry to my California friends), but it is a great launching point for asking the questions: why are the prices for a certain commodity higher in one region than another?  What factors lead to the spatial differences in the relative economic value in one region over another?  Supply and demand works beautifully on a two-axis graph, but supply and demand happen somewhere, giving a simple chart added complexity since it's spatially contingent and we must make the assumption and caveat explicit.  


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Dale Fraza's comment, February 27, 2012 3:22 PM
In an ideal world, gas prices would be $5 a gallon nationwide-with that extra $1.50 going to finding a reasonably priced alternative to oil-run vehicles.
Brittany Ortiz's curator insight, September 29, 2014 4:32 PM

This map is so interested to see! It's interesting to see how the gas prices differ from one region to the other. In the mid-west the gas sees to be awfully lower than the west. Why? Maybe because in the mid-west most families still grow there own crops and don't need to take as many trips to a grocery store than most people in the world. As California, there is obviously a big difference than other states. There also is splash of red in New York, which then we could all say both California and New York are the most popular; with there cities and fame, it is clear why then maybe the gas prices are higher there.

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Quiz: Can you name a food just by looking at where it comes from?

Quiz: Can you name a food just by looking at where it comes from? | INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIAL SCIENCES DIGITAL TEXTBOOK(PSYCHOLOGY-ECONOMICS-SOCIOLOGY):MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
I map the food, you tell me what it is.

Via Seth Dixon, FCHSAPGEO
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Lora Tortolani's curator insight, February 11, 8:44 PM

Another great tool to use when teaching kids where our food comes from.  I love quizzes like these!

Gabriel Olson's curator insight, February 13, 2:59 PM

We ought to know something about where our food comes from...

Eden Eaves's curator insight, March 24, 1:04 AM

Unit 5

Some  of these maps are easy to guess, such as cotton being grown in the south, but what about others like pigs being raised in the mid-west and North Carolina??? We are so used to having only to make a quick stop at the nearest grocery store to grab our weekly essentials that we don't always think about where it naturally comes from. Also preservatives have come so far as to keep things fresh for long periods of time that where it originates is not a problem because it can be shipped in a refrigerated truck with still time left for it to sit in your fridge for a few days. 

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The Geography of Language

"Over the course of human history, thousands of languages have developed from what was once a much smaller number. How did we end up with so many? And how do we keep track of them all? Alex Gendler explains how linguists group languages into language families, demonstrating how these linguistic trees give us crucial insights into the past."


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Woodstock School's curator insight, June 4, 2014 6:05 AM

A good teaching tool for explaining the diversity of languages.

Adilson Camacho's curator insight, June 12, 2014 9:38 PM

Geografia Cultural

Chris Plummer's curator insight, January 11, 11:46 PM

Summary- This video explains how so many languages came to be and why. By the early existence of human there was a such smaller variety of languages. Tribes that spoke one language would often split in search of new recourses. Searching tribe would develop in many new different ways than the original tribe. new foods, land, and other elements created a radically different language than the original. 

 

Insight- In unit 3 we study language as a big element of out chapter. One key question in chapter 6 was why are languages distributed the way they are. It is obvious from the video that languages are distributed they way they are is because of the breaking up from people which forced people to develop differently thus creating a different language. As this process continues, there become more and more branches of a language family.  

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Understanding "Eat Local"

Understanding "Eat Local" | INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIAL SCIENCES DIGITAL TEXTBOOK(PSYCHOLOGY-ECONOMICS-SOCIOLOGY):MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

This Oregon-based infographic succinctly summarizes the local food movement and taps into the cultural ethos that permeates the growing number of consumers that are demanding more home-grown products.


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Which Regions Produce the Most NFL Players?

Which Regions Produce the Most NFL Players? | INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIAL SCIENCES DIGITAL TEXTBOOK(PSYCHOLOGY-ECONOMICS-SOCIOLOGY):MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Despite Friday Night Lights portrayals, there's a lot more geographic diversity in NFL prospects than you might think.

 

Happy NFL draft weekend!  As I'm sure you were asking yourself, I was thinking, "where do NFL players come from?" Are there strong spatial patterns of this distribution?  How do cultural forces impact the prevalence of a particular sport in a specific region?  It's not as skewed to the South a you might think. 


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What Percent Are You?

What Percent Are You? | INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIAL SCIENCES DIGITAL TEXTBOOK(PSYCHOLOGY-ECONOMICS-SOCIOLOGY):MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
See how your household income ranks in 344 zones across the country.

 

It isn't always about how much you make, but purchasing power, cost of living and local economic situations show us that one number doesn't tell the story of the national economy.  This interactive feature compares household incomes with how they would compare with other regions of the country.  


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