INTRODUCTION TO T...
Follow
Find tag "environment"
1.3K views | +3 today
INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIAL SCIENCES DIGITAL TEXTBOOK(PSYCHOLOGY-ECONOMICS-SOCIOLOGY):MIKE BUSARELLO
“In the business world, the rearview mirror is always clearer than the windshield.” Warren Buffet
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from consumer psychology
Scoop.it!

Microbeads are a sign of our plastic consumer madness

Microbeads are a sign of our plastic consumer madness | INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIAL SCIENCES DIGITAL TEXTBOOK(PSYCHOLOGY-ECONOMICS-SOCIOLOGY):MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"Plastic has made life more convenient, but many of us remember a time when we got along fine without it ..."


Via Leona Ungerer
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from Navigate
Scoop.it!

Columbia University and the Van Alen Institute Map How Our Brains Navigate the City

Columbia University and the Van Alen Institute Map How Our Brains Navigate the City | INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIAL SCIENCES DIGITAL TEXTBOOK(PSYCHOLOGY-ECONOMICS-SOCIOLOGY):MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
The GSAPP’s Cloud Lab teams up with neurologists and the design institute to track how urban environments can make people relaxed or tense.

This spring, the Cloud Lab at Columbia University and the Van Alen Institute tackled the challenge of assessing and mapping how people respond to their environment as a part of Van Alen’s Elsewhere series on wellness in the city.

Instead of the typical focus groups, however, the researchers tracked brainwaves to gauge the mental activities of nearly 100 volunteers; using electroencephalography-based (EEG) measurements and the GPS tracking app, the research team collected more than 1 gigabyte of data over 200 walking sessions that, in theory, create a snapshot of a day-in-the-life of the neighborhood’s mental states. 

Presenting the data in a manner that retained its spatial qualities required the researchers to develop their own software for visualization. At a public follow-up presentation in May, the team presented the simplified data on a 3D map of DUMBO. Areas in cyan indicate places in which participants were in a more meditative and relaxed state, while areas in red indicate places where participants had a more focused or heightened sense of awareness...


Via Lauren Moss, Suvi Salo
more...
Bhopkins's curator insight, August 22, 2014 10:53 AM

"Architects and planners could employ the technology during post-occupancy walkthroughs or preliminary design presentations."

Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Cows make less milk in hot sticky weather

Cows make less milk in hot sticky weather | INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIAL SCIENCES DIGITAL TEXTBOOK(PSYCHOLOGY-ECONOMICS-SOCIOLOGY):MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Research news from leading universities...

 

Sometimes whe teach human geography as though it is not connected to physical geography.  The geographical distribution patterns of agriculture are some of the most highly correlated human activities to the physical environment.  This one, dairy productivity, changes greatly based on temperatures, humidity and latitude. 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

China now eats twice the meat we do

China now eats twice the meat we do | INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIAL SCIENCES DIGITAL TEXTBOOK(PSYCHOLOGY-ECONOMICS-SOCIOLOGY):MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
We can learn a lot from examining the way China's diet has changed in the last 20 years -- as well as its required efficiencies and the agriculture that supports it.

 

The United States still consumes more meat per capita than China, but as China's economy has grown (along with it's income and standard of living), the consumer habits have changed as well.  What will the impacts of the rise in Chinese meat consumption mean?   How do they get all this meat?  http://www.scoop.it/t/geography-education/p/1661841673/this-little-piggy-is-going-to-china


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Brett Sinica's curator insight, November 29, 2013 2:07 PM

This is actuallty very believable considering the population growth that China has experienced.  It only makes sense that the more people there are, the more meat will be consumed.  It is part of their cuisine to include meat.  Pork and chicken are among many of the popular proteins which are found on their dishes.  There is also the expansion to go along with all of the growth.  The landscape of the eastern part of the country has become more agriculturally accomodating for crops and livestock alike.  Therefore to match the trend of growing population, is the need to match it with meat and other foods.

Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, April 14, 2014 6:25 PM

China now eats twice as much meat than America. However, this chart does not touch upon "per-capita" which plays a major role in where the food is being dispersed and consumed. 

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 15, 2014 1:55 PM

China's meat demand is being met by importing meat. As the standard of living rises more of China's population are looking to branch out in regards to their diet, what is interesting is that this is also an example of cultures blending. Food is a great indicator of cultural diffusion. As China becomes more globalized we are seeing their diet and consumption patterns becoming less local and tradition.

Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Turbulence on the Mekong River

Turbulence on the Mekong River | INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIAL SCIENCES DIGITAL TEXTBOOK(PSYCHOLOGY-ECONOMICS-SOCIOLOGY):MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
The Mekong River was once a wild and primitive backwater. Today, growing demands for electricity and rapid economic growth are changing the character of what is the world's 12th-longest river.

 

Economic progress for some often entails job loss and environmental degradation for others.  The once isolated and remote Mekong is experiences some impacts of globalization with residents having mixed feelings about the prospects. 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Emma Lafleur's curator insight, April 30, 2013 8:03 PM

It seems to be a theme that across the bored, people are building things that directly and negatively impact the environment and the local people. There are always two sides to the problem. On one hand, the dam can help with the development of Laos because it will bring in money, but it will also destroy the fish population and therefore many fishermen will lose their jobs and people will lose a food source. It is a difficult problem because Laos needs money because there is a lot of poverty in this rural country and the fishermen do not add a whole lot to the economy, but the people need a way to survive and make money for their families as well. It's a problem that I think will be around for generation to come.

Al Picozzi's curator insight, November 26, 2013 11:35 AM

Seems the price of modernizing will be the local economy that as existed here for centuries.  It is not a small industy either, it is according to the report a billion dollar fishing industry.  However with a growing population and a demand for electricity the river is the perfect source for this power.  This globalization, like all globalization, will help some and will hurt some.  What you have to ask yourself is will it help more than it hurts?  Will it help in the long run, over time?  For everyone involoved in globalization these answeres are never the same everywhere.

Hector Alonzo's curator insight, December 15, 2014 9:21 PM

The Mekong river is a river that many fisherman in Laos depend on for food and income. Plans to build dams that will cause the fish to seek an alternate route to migrate upstream. Critics of the dams say that the dams will cause the fish to abandon the Mekong river and go through their neighboring rivers, leaving the residents without a source of income. Many in favor of the dams say the reverse, that building the dams will boost economy and cause the area to flourish.

Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Mapping the Anthropocene

Mapping the Anthropocene | INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIAL SCIENCES DIGITAL TEXTBOOK(PSYCHOLOGY-ECONOMICS-SOCIOLOGY):MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

As follow-up to an earlier post about how we have enter the age of the Anthropocene, this stunning map is a fantastic visual representation of the forces that merit the dawning of a new geologic age.  This map depicts the lights at night, major roads, railways power lines, oversea cables, airline routes and shipping lanes.  It also expands the areas according to population size.  For more on the production of this map, see the Globaia website: http://globaia.org/en/anthropocene/

 

Spotted on Living Geography: http://livinggeography.blogspot.com/2012/03/new-map-of-anthropocene.html


Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Guns, Germs & Steel

Guns, Germs & Steel | INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIAL SCIENCES DIGITAL TEXTBOOK(PSYCHOLOGY-ECONOMICS-SOCIOLOGY):MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

This video (like the book with the same title) explores the course of human history to find the geographic factors that can help to explain the global inequalities between societies. Jared Diamond’s answer lies in the military strength (guns), superior pathogens (germs) and industrial production (steel) that agricultural societies were able to develop as the critical advantages over hunter/gatherer societies. The raw materials at the disposal of the societies inhabiting particular environments partially explain the economic possibilities before them. Diamond hypothesizes that the orientations of the continents play a critical role in the relative advantages among agricultural societies (East-West orientations allow for greater diffusion of agricultural technologies than North-South orientations since the growing seasons and ecology are more compatible), giving Eurasia an advantage over Africa and the Americas. The Fertile Crescent had native plant and animal species ideal for domestication, which then diffused to Europe. Societies that have more developed animal husbandry develop a resistance to more powerful germs. Consequently, when two societies come in contact those with the best resistance to the worse diseases are more successful. Similarly, industrial production depends on an agricultural surplus since specialization requires that some workers not needing to produce their own food to work on technological innovations. Societies that had agricultural advantages were able to invest in technologies (primarily steel) that would enhance their advantages over other societies, as seen during colonization. Societies that had the best environments had access to large plant eating mammals suitable for domestication and the most productive grains would be poised to produce more dangerous guns, germs and steel—the key resources for economic dominion resulting in global inequalities.


Diamond’s critics argue that the ‘geography hypothesis’ is environmental determinism that does not properly value human choices into the equation. Still, the core of this book is the search for connections between the themes of Geography with a spatial framework and the video is available via Netflix, public libraries and many other outlets.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Emily Bian's curator insight, October 3, 2014 5:16 PM

I found this just browsing the suggestions, and I was like "Whoa! We learned this in class!" So I thought that it was really neat. 

Diamond's theory is an example of environmental determinism, because he claimed that the environment and where people lived affected the people, and that's why not everybody is equal. 

I personally agree with his theory, because it makes a lot of sense when I watched the movie/episodes.

             I believe in enviromental determinism but not to the extreme level, for example if someone is from a hot place they are lazy. I believe that people have choices and can pave their own way but the enviroment can limit them. This would for sure help future aphug students because it introduces human geography in the world history context. 

 

Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

The true cost of oil

TED Talks What does environmental devastation actually look like? At TEDxVictoria, photographer Garth Lenz shares shocking photos of the Alberta Tar Sands mining project -- and the beautiful (and vital) ecosystems under threat.

 

This is a visually stunning portrayal of Canadian landscapes.   He shows incredibly gorgeous photographs of the ecosystems of the boreal forest, indigenous cultural landscapes and natural scenery.  This is unfortunately the backdrop for the impacts of industrial extraction of oil from the tar sands of the Athabasca in Canada.  Collectively, this makes for a jarring justaposition of environmental landscapes.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, January 29, 2014 10:59 AM

This presentation is very moving on the emotional side of the plight of Canada’s natural resources.  When it comes to oil production no matter where it is it will be dirty, messy and fraught with problems that impact the environment.  The idea that everyone wants oil but they don’t want to mess up their own country to get it is an interesting problem.  Frankly the more developed countries like Canada are more likely to mine the resources responsibly then a country that has little or no environmental protections.  This speaker gives a very impassioned presentation but he offers no alternatives to oil.  Getting oil from a country that has environmental protection laws is cleaner and better then getting it from a country that cares nothing for the environment; it is less accountable and more environmentally damaging to get it from somewhere else.  Pipelines are cleaner ways of moving oil as they seldom leak and don’t crash and spill.  The debate over oil and environmental responsibility will continue until a viable source of clean energy is created. 

Louis Mazza's curator insight, January 28, 12:37 PM

this video shows the beauties to be found in world, and the negative effects that mining for oil can do to these areas. in one region it was home to a type of deer but all they could be found was the deers antlers. that showed that mining for oil was killing all the deer. all these regions are under threat. the largest toxic wastelands on the planet are being created.

Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Dangerous work

Dangerous work | INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIAL SCIENCES DIGITAL TEXTBOOK(PSYCHOLOGY-ECONOMICS-SOCIOLOGY):MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
In Guatemala City, a place called "The Mine" can deliver both a means of survival and a grisly death. Every day, dozens of residents salvage a living by scouring the massive dump for scrap metal.

 

This thanksgiving I'd like to discuss one of my goals in teaching a geography course in the developed world. I hope to cultivate a sense of thanksgiving and gratitude for the many good things that are easy to take for granted. Balanced with that, I try to teach that economic disparities are NOT a function of moral, mental or physical superiority.  Therefore I try to instill a sense of thankfulness that does not become boastfulness or entitlement--hopefully that ethos will infuse this day's festivities. Happy Thanksgiving!


Via Seth Dixon
more...
sdion's comment, January 30, 2012 2:23 PM
makes me thankful for the jobs i have. i also wonder what the health side effects are of working in these locations. are the workers experiencing shorter life spans or anything like that?
Cam E's curator insight, February 4, 2014 12:28 PM

As someone who has scoured dumps for things before, this sounds like no fun at all! You can find a lot of cool things that are left at dumps, but this doesn't even begin to compare to what they're facing at "The Mine". The smell and possible injuries must be overwhelming. If left untreated, a cut from anything in one of these places could prove fatal.

Rachel Phillips's curator insight, February 12, 6:12 PM

Looking at this situation made me really sad, and made me realize that we take a lot for granted.  Here I am, sitting in a comfy chair, using my thousand dollar Macbook, and these people are risking their lives just to make $20.  They risk everything, in any weather, just for the possibility of finding something that they can sell to support their families, and these are the things no one thinks about.  This isn't to say that anyone's "bad situation" isn't bad for them personally, but this is unbelievable to me.  

Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from news around the world
Scoop.it!

Will Puerto Rico Become The New Cuba In Florida In The 2016 Election? - NewZwolf.com

Will Puerto Rico Become The New Cuba In Florida In The 2016 Election? - NewZwolf.com | INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIAL SCIENCES DIGITAL TEXTBOOK(PSYCHOLOGY-ECONOMICS-SOCIOLOGY):MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Puerto Ricans will pass Cubans as the largest Latino group in Florida in the coming years. But will the issue of the island becoming the 51st state mobilize Puerto Ricans in the key swing state in 2016?

Via NEWZwolf.com
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

The Last Drop: America's Breadbasket Faces Dire Water Crisis

The Last Drop: America's Breadbasket Faces Dire Water Crisis | INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIAL SCIENCES DIGITAL TEXTBOOK(PSYCHOLOGY-ECONOMICS-SOCIOLOGY):MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Editor's note: This story is one in a series on a crisis in America's Breadbasket –the depletion of the Ogallala Aquifer and its effects on a region that hel...

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Linda Denty's curator insight, July 24, 2014 6:46 PM

Could this happen in Australia also?

Jamie Strickland's curator insight, July 25, 2014 10:46 AM

Thanks to my good friend, Seth Dixon for the original scoop.  There had been quite a bit of news reporting on the drought in central California this year, but this midwestern region has been experiencing water stress for years with little national attention.  I plan to use this article in both an upcoming presentation as well as an example when I teach "Tragedy of the Commons" in my Environmental Dilemma class.

Kate Buckland's curator insight, July 26, 2014 10:32 PM

Good to compare to how we use water resources in Australia

Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Landscapes of Oil

Landscapes of Oil | INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIAL SCIENCES DIGITAL TEXTBOOK(PSYCHOLOGY-ECONOMICS-SOCIOLOGY):MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Socks is a online magazine about Media, Art, Architecture, Cities, Design, Technology.

 

Our society is obviously heavily dependent on oil.  Yet we often don't see the environmental impacts of our collective oil consumption on the landscape because the negative impacts have been spatially separated away from oil consumers.  This is an excellent compilation of photos by Edward Burtynsky that makes the connection between oil consumption and changes to both the physical and cultural landscapes explicit.  For more images by this artist, see: http://www.edwardburtynsky.com/ ;


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Joseph Nadeem's comment, October 2, 2012 2:10 AM
Welcome to Renaissance Education Foundation (REF)
www.reduf.org
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CFLFlMHBxj0
http://www.facebook.com/posted.php?id=160491263966987
http://www.causes.com/causes/413232-renaissance-education-foundation-ref/about?m=7f992ebd
http://ref-community-lifting-program.blogspot.com/
https://profiles.google.com/u/0/Renaissance.edu.Foundation/about?tab=qh#Renaissance.edu.Foundation/about
Renaissance Education Foundation (REF) is determined to help our poor brothers and sisters in their dreams of a better future. The REF program aims for educational excellence for low income families.
REF helps young people who, after completing basic schooling, have no possibility to continue their education. REF helps students to continue with the traditional education as well as computer training.
REF also, helps these students stand on their own by adding computer training to their qualifications.
The in demand fields are currently petrochemical, aeronautics, agriculture/dairy, banking, clothing, and educational-based industries. Our computer based technology training provides expertise in all of these fields. Therefore, computer education has become a prerequisite for becoming a successful and member of society.
REF was established in 1996 as a Not-for-Profit Organization, and is sponsored by a team of dedicated young educators and professionals. REF is located in Youhanabad Lahore Pakistan. Youhanabad is a rural area of Lahore Pakistan, in an area that is largely Christian.
Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Greenest states to own an electric car

Greenest states to own an electric car | INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIAL SCIENCES DIGITAL TEXTBOOK(PSYCHOLOGY-ECONOMICS-SOCIOLOGY):MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
The carbon emissions produced by electric cars vary depending on how a given region generates its electricity.

 

If a consumer is trying to assess the environmental impact of their automotive/transportation practices, that answer may vary according to wher they live; the type of driving, the regions energy source and local air quality all need to be factored in.  Geography always matters. 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Environmentally Conscience Manufacturing

Levi Strauss & Co. believes that water is a precious resource and everyone should do their part to lead a more WaterLess lifestyle. Find out more about our w...

 

More and more companies are strategically rethinking manufacturing to be less harmful to the environment.  There are sound economic, cultural, marketing and sustainability reasons for rethinking the manufacturing process.  In the past Levi's used more than 11 gallons to produce 1 pair of jeans to get that aesthetic look just right...this video looks at the restructuring process to make these essentially 'waterless' jeans. 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Anthropocene: Why You Should Get Used to the Age of Man (and Woman)

Anthropocene: Why You Should Get Used to the Age of Man (and Woman) | INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIAL SCIENCES DIGITAL TEXTBOOK(PSYCHOLOGY-ECONOMICS-SOCIOLOGY):MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
The cover package of this week's TIME—which should still be on newsstands—detailed the 10 ideas that are changing your life. What kind of ideas, you ask?

 

"Welcome to the Anthropocene. It’s a new geological epoch, one where the planet is shaped less by natural forces then by the combined activity, aspirations—and emissions—of more than 7 billion human beings."  Humanity's technological advancements and impact on the Earth's planetary systems is significant enough that many scientists agree that it has fundamental shifted the geologic paradigm. 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Finding the flotsam: where is Japan's floating tsunami wreckage headed?

Finding the flotsam: where is Japan's floating tsunami wreckage headed? | INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIAL SCIENCES DIGITAL TEXTBOOK(PSYCHOLOGY-ECONOMICS-SOCIOLOGY):MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

Scientists model where and when the debris from the March 2011 Japanese tsunami will be.  The likelihood that the debris (not radioactive) will reach the U.S. west coast is increasingly likely.  Look at the great video attached to the article.   


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Paige McClatchy's curator insight, December 14, 2013 6:09 PM

Hopefully none of the wreckage that reaches the US is radioactive.... But the projected travel of the debris shows how ocean currents create, almost, a "natural" globalization of natural disasters. 

Gregory S Sankey Jr.'s curator insight, September 1, 2014 10:43 AM

Although it's important to know where all of this trash is headed, this just makes me think of how we might prevent this. We can't prevent these catastrophic natural disasters, but how might we lessen it's effects on our cities and settlements? Furthermore, how might we lessen our impact on ecosystems during these times of catastrophe? 

It's only called a catastrophe when it hits human populations for a reason, it's not just devastating to us. Remnants of our lifestyle are carried far and wide, able to cause harm on many other species. 

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 15, 2014 4:37 PM

An example of how even without considering globalization the world is interconnected. The debris from the 2011 tsunami was never disposed of effectively and the United States may be effected more than they ever expected. If this pile of debris reaches US shores it will make many Americans consider how a tsunami across the globe will eventually hurt them at home. 

Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

NYTimes Video: China Halts Shipments of Rare Earths

NYTimes Video: China Halts Shipments of Rare Earths | INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIAL SCIENCES DIGITAL TEXTBOOK(PSYCHOLOGY-ECONOMICS-SOCIOLOGY):MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
In September, China stopped shipping rare earths, minerals crucial to military, cell phone and green technologies, to countries around the world. A report from the Bureau for International Reporting.

 

This 2010 video shows how a primary sector economic activity is reshaping global industry.  Green technologies are dependent on these mining resources and China is the world's rare earth 'superpower.'  Many factories have relocated in China in part because of cheap labor, but also to gain access to these rare earths.   


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Nathan Chasse's curator insight, April 12, 2014 10:09 AM

This New York Times video discusses China limiting rare earths exports. Rare earths are the heavy elements which are important components in many technologies as they are the best permanent magnets. By limiting the exports, or just completely denying a country like Japan, China sees two benefits. The first, the country gets to keep most of its rare earth resources for itself. China is on the verge of needing massive amounts of rare earths for its own people as the standard of living rises. Secondly, China is forcing many industries to open their factories in China if they want access to the rare earths China has a monopoly on, opening them up to Chinese taxes and tariffs.

Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, April 15, 2014 1:57 PM

This video discusses how rare earths are important for a green future. China has halted its shipments of rare earths, which are used in cellphones, laptops and electric cars. China has the largest population in the world and is wise for not exporting an abundance of its rare earths. It is important that the U.S. starts to mine in places such as California for these minerals. Mining may not be good for the environment, but the path to a green future starts in a mine. 

 

Albert Jordan's curator insight, April 17, 2014 1:05 PM

As the video states, China is now realizing its own domestic needs outweighs the desire to export. China needs to go "green" and fast as well as be able to supply its own domestic corporations with the resources they need to supply their own people. An interesting by product of this internalization though, is that it puts its international competitors at a disadvantage. Almost a win-win for them. Japan is a regional competitor and by lowering the amount available to America and Europe, it forces them to speed time and money looking elsewhere. It is both an economic and strategic move, as the civilian needs are important but so are the military needs of rare earths.