INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIAL SCIENCES DIGITAL TEXTBOOK(PSYCHOLOGY-ECONOMICS-SOCIOLOGY):MIKE BUSARELLO
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INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIAL SCIENCES DIGITAL TEXTBOOK(PSYCHOLOGY-ECONOMICS-SOCIOLOGY):MIKE BUSARELLO
“In the business world, the rearview mirror is always clearer than the windshield.” Warren Buffet
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How Not to Be Ignorant About the World

How much do you know about the world? Hans Rosling, with his famous charts of global population, health and income data (and an extra-extra-long pointer), demonstrates that you have a high statistical chance of being quite wrong about what you think you know. Play along with his audience quiz — then, from Hans’ son Ola, learn 4 ways to quickly get less ignorant.

Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 17, 2015 5:01 PM

Our preconceived notions of places, as well as some of the dominant narratives about regions, can cloud our understanding about the world today.  This video is a good introduction to the Ignorance Project which shows how personal bias, outdated world views and news bias collectively make combating global ignorance difficult.   However, the end of the video shows some good rules of thumb to have a more fact-based world view.  


Tagsstatistics, placeregions, media, models, gapminderdevelopment, perspective.

Adilson Camacho's curator insight, September 18, 2015 11:32 PM

adicionar sua visão ...

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How cultures around the world make decisions

How cultures around the world make decisions | INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIAL SCIENCES DIGITAL TEXTBOOK(PSYCHOLOGY-ECONOMICS-SOCIOLOGY):MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Is the American obsession with individual freedom really such a great idea? What other cultures know about how to make good choices.

Via Seth Dixon, Karen Moles Rose
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 6, 2014 1:16 PM

This article show three distinct cultural approaches to the concept of choice, showing how they shape people and communities and cultural systems.  The three models discussed are:

  • One American model: Give me personal autonomy or give me death.
  • The Amish model: Belonging, not choice, is crucial.
  • One Asian model: Focus on interdependence and harmony, not independence and self-expression.

This TED talk from Malcolm Gladwell is also an interesting exploration into the world of choice and options.


Tagsculture, worldwideTED.

Dennis Swender's curator insight, November 11, 2014 3:31 PM

Decision tilmes, more or less

Scott Langston's curator insight, November 16, 2014 6:26 PM

Culture's influence on decision-making

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How cultures around the world make decisions

How cultures around the world make decisions | INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIAL SCIENCES DIGITAL TEXTBOOK(PSYCHOLOGY-ECONOMICS-SOCIOLOGY):MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Is the American obsession with individual freedom really such a great idea? What other cultures know about how to make good choices.

Via Seth Dixon, Clairelouise
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 6, 2014 1:16 PM

This article show three distinct cultural approaches to the concept of choice, showing how they shape people and communities and cultural systems.  The three models discussed are:

  • One American model: Give me personal autonomy or give me death.
  • The Amish model: Belonging, not choice, is crucial.
  • One Asian model: Focus on interdependence and harmony, not independence and self-expression.

This TED talk from Malcolm Gladwell is also an interesting exploration into the world of choice and options.


Tagsculture, worldwideTED.

Dennis Swender's curator insight, November 11, 2014 3:31 PM

Decision tilmes, more or less

Scott Langston's curator insight, November 16, 2014 6:26 PM

Culture's influence on decision-making

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Forget multitasking, try monotasking

Forget multitasking, try monotasking | INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIAL SCIENCES DIGITAL TEXTBOOK(PSYCHOLOGY-ECONOMICS-SOCIOLOGY):MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
People aren’t just cooking anymore -- they’re cooking, texting, talking on the phone, watching YouTube and uploading photos of the awesome meal they just made. Designer Paolo Cardini questions the efficiency of our multitasking world and makes the case for -- gasp -- "monotasking." His charming 3D-printed smartphone covers just might help.

Via Barb Jemmott
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How the languages we speak affects the way we think

What can economists learn from linguists?

Tags: language, culture, economic, TED.


Via Seth Dixon, Karen Moles Rose, Lauren Maiolo
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Anne-Lous van den Ende's curator insight, May 7, 2013 11:18 AM

Intersting video on how the different languages we speak could affect our way of thinking.

Jack Born's curator insight, November 6, 2013 7:39 PM

I have never thought of this. I didn't even realise how different languages and cultures can be and how the tiny things effect the entire language.This demostrates why some languages are beter than others in their own way. 

Ms. Brin's curator insight, August 28, 2014 2:12 AM

Very interesting!

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11 Inspiring TED Talks for Modern Educators

11 Inspiring TED Talks for Modern Educators | INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIAL SCIENCES DIGITAL TEXTBOOK(PSYCHOLOGY-ECONOMICS-SOCIOLOGY):MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Educator Lisa Goochee shares these 11 inspiring TED Talks that every educator should not only see, but also share with their students and PLN—so inspiring!

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa) , Bonnie Bracey Sutton
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The Geography of Language

"Over the course of human history, thousands of languages have developed from what was once a much smaller number. How did we end up with so many? And how do we keep track of them all? Alex Gendler explains how linguists group languages into language families, demonstrating how these linguistic trees give us crucial insights into the past."


Via Seth Dixon, Michael Miller
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Woodstock School's curator insight, June 4, 2014 6:05 AM

A good teaching tool for explaining the diversity of languages.

Adilson Camacho's curator insight, June 12, 2014 9:38 PM

Geografia Cultural