Aquatic Vet News You-can-Use
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Aquatic Vet News You-can-Use
News of interest to aquatic veterinarians
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Shrimp EMS Outbreak: Impacts continue but industry may be gaining

Global Aquaculture Alliance President George Chamberlain recently reported that as early mortality syndrome (EMS) continues to take a toll on the global shrimp-farming sector, advancing knowledge is progressively leading toward improved practices and better control of the disease.

 

In his May 20 presentation to members of the National Fisheries Institute Shrimp Council, Chamberlain updated the EMS status of primary production areas and passed on recommendations for management methods to reduce the impacts of EMS. The update comes about two months after GAA launched a case study to identify the shrimp-farming practices that prevent the manifestation of EMS. The case study will act as a foundation for recommendations to the aquaculture community for better shrimp-farming practices.

 

Go to the source for information on:

The EMS Status

Expert Observations

GAA Recommendations

A Global EMS Survey

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FAO 2014 Report Highlights the Growing Role of Aquaculture in Feeding the World

FAO 2014 Report Highlights the Growing Role of Aquaculture in Feeding the World | Aquatic Vet News You-can-Use | Scoop.it
GLOBAL - More people than ever before rely on fisheries and aquaculture for food and as a source of income, but harmful practices and poor management threaten the sector’s sustainability, says a new FAO report.

 

The full FAO 2014 "State of World Fisheries & Aquaculture" report is accessible from www.fao.org/documents/card/en/c/097d8007-49a4-4d65-88cd-fcaf6a969776.

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USDA-APHIS lifts Federal Order for documenting VHS freedom for fish moved interstate

USDA-APHIS lifts Federal Order for documenting VHS freedom for fish moved interstate | Aquatic Vet News You-can-Use | Scoop.it

APHIS to Lift Viral Hemorrhagic Septicemia Federal Order

 

WASHINGTON, April 14, 2014—The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) is lifting the Viral Hemorrhagic Septicemia (VHS) Federal Order that was first issued in 2006 in response to an outbreak of the fish disease in the Great Lakes region.  

 

After studying the disease, conducting surveillance and evaluating the latest science, APHIS has determined it can safely remove the Federal Order as long as states maintain existing VHS regulations and other practices to reduce risk.  

 

By removing the Federal Order, which has become duplicative with state regulations, we can still protect the health of farmed and wild fish while also supporting the interstate movement needs of the aquaculture industry. Beginning June 2, APHIS will no longer prohibit or restrict the interstate movement of VHS-susceptible species of live fish from VHS-affected or at-risk states, including: Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Minnesota, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania and Wisconsin. In addition, APHIS will no longer restrict the importation of the same species of live fish from Ontario and Quebec, Canada into the United States. However, this action does not affect the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s salmonid importation requirements as found in title 50 of the Code of Federal Regulations.

 

Although APHIS will no longer regulate VHS, the Agency’s Veterinary Services program will continue to work with states and industry to promote sound biosecurity practices and share scientific updates regarding the disease.


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Aquatic Veterinary Medicine - the paths to your dream career!

This presentation to the Murdoch University veterinary students provides an insight into the burgeoning field of aquatic veterinary medicine. It will provide...
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Sea otters can get the flu, too

Sea otters can get the flu, too | Aquatic Vet News You-can-Use | Scoop.it
Northern sea otters living off the coast of Washington state were infected with the same H1N1 flu virus that caused the world-wide pandemic in 2009, according to a new U.S. Geological Survey and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention study.
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Australian scientists proposed the use of koi herpesvirus for biological control of carp

A scientist hopes a herpes virus might be used to wipe out carp that are devastating Murray Darling waterways from Queensland to South Australia.

 

Although not yet approved for release by the Federal Government, it is hoped the biological control could wipe out about 80 per cent of the carp.

 

Carp are regarded as one of the world’s most damaging pests. They stir up mud, making it difficult for native fish and birds to feed, often out-competing valued local fauna.

 

NSW Primary Industries Department senior research scientist Dean Gilligan said the virus attacked the gills. It took about six days to incubate and carp died within 24 hours of showing symptoms. Dr Gilligan, who has been working with the CSIRO on the project, has not yet found any native species that the virus might jump to. He said it would be impossible to ... ... (see the source for the full story).


Other information:

http://www.feral.org.au/wp-content/uploads/2012/04/CPFS7.pdf

http://www.ecosmagazine.com/?act=view_file&file_id=EC132p4.pdf

http://tinyurl.com/lbbfp9w

http://tinyurl.com/np2xzny

http://www.fisheries.co.uk/news/news/khv.htm

 

 

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Norwegian study suggest drug residues in farmed fish is within permitted limits

Norwegian study suggest drug residues in farmed fish is within permitted limits | Aquatic Vet News You-can-Use | Scoop.it
THE results of analyses performed on 8,940 farmed fish in 2013 showed neither residues of legal medicines above permitted limits nor traces of illegal...

 

After reading the news story, go to www.nifes.no/forsiden/?lang_id=2 to read the actual NIFES information

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Mycobacterium marinum skin infection traced to NYC fish markets

(AP)—Health officials say they have traced a rare skin infection to raw seafood purchased at fish markets in New York City's three Chinatowns.

 

The Health Department says there have been 30 reported cases of the infection caused by a bacterium called Mycobacterium marinum.

 

All the victims said they had handled live or raw seafood from Chinatown fish markets in Manhattan, Brooklyn or Queens. Symptoms include red, tender lumps and swelling under the skin of their hands or arms. Sometimes people also develop swelling or pain in their hands or arms and have difficulty moving their fingers.


The Health Department is urging people to wear waterproof gloves when handling raw fish that comes from a Chinatown market.

There is no risk associated with eating the fish.

 

Explore further: Skin infection linked to exposure to aquariums is under-diagnosed

 
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Some lessons from Norway salmon for Vietnam pangasius

Some lessons from Norway salmon for Vietnam pangasius | Aquatic Vet News You-can-Use | Scoop.it

After collapsing in 1991, Norwegian salmon industry recovered with a national brand name and effective marketing strategies. Norwegian salmon can stand firmly in the international markets. Norway has succeeded in ...

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Global fish trade breaks records

Global fish trade breaks records | Aquatic Vet News You-can-Use | Scoop.it

Coming  on the heels of a World Bank report, ’Fish To 2030; Prospects for Fisheries and Aquaculture,’ in which the organization said that aquaculture and fisheries will provide future food security which will be critical in feeding the growing population beyond 2030. Asia — including South Asia, South-East Asia, China and Japan — is projected to make up 70% of global fish consumption by that year so those challenges must be appropriately tackled in the next 15 years.

 

.... ... ... Between one third and 40% of all fish produced is now traded internationally, making fish and fisheries products one of the most-traded food commodities in the world. “The record trade figures reflect the strong growth in aquaculture output and the high prices for a number of species such as salmon and shrimp,” said Audun Lem, Chief of FAO’s Products, Trade and Marketing Branch. “This is underpinned by firm underlying demand for fish products from world markets.” Lem also sees the fisheries sector as one of the most globalized and dynamic industries in world food production and said that “the proportion of fish production being traded internationally is significant, at around 37% in 2013.”


See the source for full information and a brief video on the issue

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Acid waters (assumed from high CO2 environmental levels) decimates scallop farm

Acid waters (assumed from high CO2 environmental levels) decimates scallop farm | Aquatic Vet News You-can-Use | Scoop.it

High acid levels in the waters around Parksville Qualicum Beach have killed 10 million scallops and forced a local shellfish producer to scale operations back considerably.

 

Island Scallops CEO Rob Saunders said the company has lost three years worth of scallops and $10 million. "I'm not sure we are going to stay alive and I'm not sure the oyster industry is going to stay alive," Saunders told The NEWS. "It's that dramatic."


Saunders said the carbon dioxide levels have increased dramatically in the waters of the Georgia Strait, forcing the PH levels to 7.3 from their norm of 8.1 or 8.2. Island Scallops seeds its animals at its hatchery in Qualicum Bay and they are reared in the ocean in small net cages attached to horizontal "longlines," according to the company's website.

 

The longlines are submerged about 10 metres  below the surface in water about 30 metres deep. From hatchery to harvest takes about three years. Saunders said the company has lost all the scallops put in the ocean in 2010, 2011 and 2012.

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Laboratory zebrafish euthanasia methods questioned

Laboratory zebrafish euthanasia methods questioned | Aquatic Vet News You-can-Use | Scoop.it
Common anaesthetic not the most humane option for zebrafish euthanasia, say studies.
David Scarfe PhD, DVM, MRSSAf, CertAqV 's insight:

A new study just published in the open access journal PLoS ONE shows how practices in research laboratories can be made more animal friendly. Fish are the most commonly used research animal in Canada, and at the end of an experiment laboratory fish are typically killed by emersion in a chemical anaesthetic. UBC researchers devised a clever experiment to ‘ask ‘ the fish how they evaluated different anaesthetics, including the most common agent ,TMS (also known as MS-222). Fish were tested in a tank with two compartments, and were trained to associate a food reward with the ‘light’ side of the tank. After training all fish spent almost all their time in this side of the apparatus, and would immediately enter the light side when placed into the test apparatus. The fish were then exposed to one of the anaesthetics while in the light side of the tank. All fish lost consciousness and were allowed to recover in another tank. When fish were then retested (with the test apparatus now cleaned of all chemicals), all fish that had been exposed to the TMS now avoided the light side. This type of conditioned place avoidance response indicates that the fish learned to associate the previously positive environment with some negative effect of the TMS. Fish exposed to the other agents (clove oil and metomidate) showed much less evidence of aversion. This research suggest that researchers using fish should avoid the use of TMS as an anaesthetic or euthanasia agent.

D Wong, MAG von Keyserlingk, JG Richards, DM Weary. 2014. Conditioned Place Avoidance of Zebrafish (Danio rerio) to Three Chemicals Used for Euthanasia and Anaesthesia. PLOS ONE 9 (2), e88030

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Video - acclimating & checking aquarium fish

See a short 3 minute video on how to acclimate fish to new aquarium, and what to do after treating them with medication, to enhance their health and welfare...

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Debate on GMO Fish, Food Stirs Strong Feelings in NYC

A panel of experts on genetically modified organisms (GMOs) gathered Sunday, April 27 at the Food Book Fair in Williamsburg, New York City, US, to debate the risks and benefits of genetically modified food. The debate, sponsored by the Museum of Food and Drink (MOFAD), was one of the fair’s major draws.

 

Forming the panel were Amy Harmon, a Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist from the New York Times, Cathleen Enright PhD, of the Biotechnology Industry Organization (an industry trade group), Margaret Mellon PhD, formerly of the Union of Concerned Scientists, and Michael Hansen PhD, from Consumers Union. The debate was moderated by Dave Arnold, Founder and President of the Museum of Food and Drink.

 

Topics covered during the debate included:

* Public Perception of GM

* GM’s Role in Food Security

* Product Labeling

* Political and Corporate Issues

 

See more at: http://www.thefishsite.com/fishnews/23228/debate-on-gmo-fish-food-stirs-strong-feelings-in-nyc#sthash.fNKtqCTR.dpuf

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Farmed Fish Vaccination Good for Animals & Humans

NETHERLANDS - More than half of the fish consumed worldwide is cultivated in ponds or tanks and the percentage of cultivated fish in relation to wild fish is increasing. The scale on which fish are currently farmed makes it necessary to protect them, by means of vaccination, against disease and premature death.

 

An understanding of the immune system in fish will hopefully lead to effective vaccination methods and healthy farmed fish. That is the view Professor Geert Wiegertjes expressed on 15 May upon formally accepting the post of personal Professor of Cell Biology and Immunology at Wageningen University. The essence of an immune or defence system is the ability to distinguish between the body’s own cells and those of another organism.


The immune system is to some extent genetically determined but it also has an acquired or learned component. The acquired defence mechanism works with a particular form of memory. Until recently it was assumed that this did not apply to the defence mechanisms we are born with. However, new research has shown ... ... .

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Aquatic And Marine Animal Veterinary Technicians - a Guide

Aquatic And Marine Animal Veterinary Technicians - a Guide | Aquatic Vet News You-can-Use | Scoop.it
Veterinary technicians work with maine animals too. Find out what you should know, learn, and study to work on this rewarding and exciting specialty.
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2014 Aquatic Vet Student/New Graduate Education Grants - applications close April 30

Aquatic Veterinary Educational Grants for Veterinary Students & Recent Graduates – applications close April 30, 2014

 

Are you a student or a recently graduated veterinarian interested in finding out what aquatic veterinary medicine is all about or expanding your professional skills with aquatic animals?

 

The World Aquatic Veterinary Medical Association, in collaboration with the American Veterinary Medical Foundation and the American Veterinary Medical Association, will award up to 20 Aquatic Veterinary Educational Grants (up to $1,000) to veterinary students and recent veterinary graduates who are interested in exploring a career in aquatic veterinary medicine.

 

Funding from these awards can be used for a variety of aquatic veterinary educational opportunities, including attending workshops or meetings, externships or internships, or to support aquatic veterinary research projects. Awards are intended to assist veterinary students and veterinarians that have graduated in the previous two years and wish to become more involved with aquatic veterinary medicine.

 

All individuals that receive an award will provide a written report after completing their activity or project for possible publication in WAVMA’s quarterly publication, The Aquatic Veterinarian.

 

Applications for the 2014 program are now open, and will close on April 30, 2014.

 

Click the following links for more information, an application form or to contact a program administrator with questions about this program.

 

This program was established in 2010 to honor John Leland Pitts, DVM (1941-2009), who contributed significantly to advancing the discipline of aquatic veterinary medicine and the involvement of veterinary students and newly graduated veterinarians through the formation of the Student American Veterinary Medical Association.

 

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Updates on new trout disease (virus Y)

Updates on new trout disease (virus Y) | Aquatic Vet News You-can-Use | Scoop.it
NORWAY - The Norwegian Veterinary Institute has released an update on the new trout disease that has been detected in Norwegian hatcheries.
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"Ins-and-Outs” of extralabel use of aquatic veterinary drugs

As a practicing aquatic veterinarian, you’ve likely utilized a drug in an extra-label manner. But you might be wondering, “What kind of use is actually considered “extra-label?” “What gives me the legal ability to use and prescribe extralabel drugs?” or “What conditions must be met so that I don’t run afoul of the rules?”

 

These are all great questions. By explaining the FDA’s requirements for extra-label drug use in animals, this article helps provide some answers ... ... .

 

To find the answers, go to http://tinyurl.com/l8vjgef. ;

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Q&A about veterinary prescriptions and pharmacies

Need answers to common questions about writing and dispensing veterinary prescriptions, and about pharmacies?

 

The AVMA provides answers to the most common questions received at http://tinyurl.com/kgndsea. ;

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Worlds Largest Prawn Farm to be Built in Zhongshan China

Worlds Largest Prawn Farm to be Built in Zhongshan China | Aquatic Vet News You-can-Use | Scoop.it
CHINA - A Sino Foreign Joint Venture Company is to develop a 8,000 MU prawn and agriculture center in Zhongshan, Guangdong Province, China. The farm will be indoor and twice as big as the largest prawn farm known today.
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Mass-death of Canadian scallops - Ocean pH changes

Mass-death of Canadian scallops - Ocean pH changes | Aquatic Vet News You-can-Use | Scoop.it

Three years’ worth of scallops, worth more than Canadian $10 million, has been wiped out at a shellfish producer in British Columbia.

 

According to local sources, the bivalves were victims of rising acidity in the waters off the west coast of Canada.

Speaking to the Parksville Qualicum Beach News, the CEO of Island Scallops, Rob Saunders said, ‘I'm not sure we are going to stay alive and I'm not sure the oyster industry is going to stay alive, it's that dramatic.’


Saunders went on to explain that the pH levels in the waters of the Georgia Strait, where the scallops are raised and harvested, had dropped from 8.2 to 7.3 in less than a year, a devastating increase in ocean acidity. According to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) ocean acidification is the reaction between seawater and carbon dioxide, producing carbonic acid.

 

Island Scallops seeds its animals at its hatchery in Qualicum Bay and they are reared in the ocean in small net cages attached to horizontal ‘longlines’, which are submerged about 10 metres below the surface.

From hatchery to harvest takes about ... ... ,

 

See the source for the full story.

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Zebrafish study seeks to uncover novel drugs for human aggression

An international project involving research groups from across Europe and the USA, and including the University of Leicester, is seeking to investigate the causes of aggression – and ways of controlling this behaviour.

 

Researchers from the University of Leicester’s Department of Biology will study zebrafish to investigate pathological aggression. This will help scientists understand the function of aggression-linked genes in the brain as well as allowing better subtyping of aggression and anti-social personality types. The research will also use juvenile fish to develop novel interventions for treating aggression.

 

It is hoped that a greater understanding of the causes of aggression, both impulsive and instrumental, will significantly improve the lives of patients and their families by offering more individualised treatment plans.

 

Research lead, Dr Will Norton from the University of Leicester, explained: “We live in an increasingly violent society and we don’t know why. Aggression is an extremely complex behaviour which is becoming a big societal problem. There are currently very few drugs available to treat aggression and ... ... .

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Fish have feelings too

Fish have feelings too | Aquatic Vet News You-can-Use | Scoop.it
Our obligation to keep the suffering of laboratory animals to a minimum — both in life and in death — does not apply only to mammals.
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Should animals have legal rights?

Should animals have legal rights? | Aquatic Vet News You-can-Use | Scoop.it
Will animals always be our property to breed, kill, study or incarcerate at our will?
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