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Ocea, Bremnes Seashore team up for thermal, green sea-lice solution | Undercurrent News

Ocea, Bremnes Seashore team up for thermal, green sea-lice solution | Undercurrent News | Aquaculture Directory | Scoop.it

Norwegian salmon farmer Bremnes Seashore has teamed up with aquaculture equipment and solutions provider Ocea to jointly develop the latter’s environmental friendly delousing solution, reported Norwegian media

 

Under a newly signed deal, the two companies have agreed to together further develop Ocea’s Thermolicer, which Ocea is bringing for the first time to Norway, said iLaks.no.

 

As part of the deal, Ocea will also supply Bremnes Seashore a new 400 metric ton feeding fleet, a renovation of a feeding station and other equipment for a combined value of NOK 28 million.

 

Ocea has worked on Thermolicer, a thermal solution for delousing fish, since 2007. It has patented the technique, which is being applied commercially in Chile already. The technique is now ready for commercial use in Norway, said the company.

 

Thermolicer works by pumping the fish into a lukewarm water bath for under 30 seconds. The lice cannot withstand the sudden temperature change and dies. The fish is then released lice-free into the sea, while the lice is collected and destroyed.

 

The technique has yielded very good results in Chile, with very low mortality both right after the treatment and over a longer period, said Ocea’s Karl Petter Myklebust.

 

Together with Bremnes, the company wants to further develop the process, with a focus on increasing its capacity while maintaining the fish’s wellbeing.


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John Bostock's curator insight, June 12, 8:43 AM

In the interest of balance - here's another very interesting approach for sea lice treatment

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Do anti-parasitic medicines used in aquaculture pose a risk to the Norwegian aquatic environment? - Environmental Science & Technology (ACS Publications)

Do anti-parasitic medicines used in aquaculture pose a risk to the Norwegian aquatic environment? - Environmental Science & Technology (ACS Publications) | Aquaculture Directory | Scoop.it

Aquaculture production is an important industry in many countries and there has been a growth in the use of medicines to ensure the health and cost effectiveness of the industry. This study focussed in the inputs of sea lice medication to the marine environment. Diflubenzuron, teflubenzuron, emamectin benzoate, cypermethrin and deltamethrin were measured in water, sediment and biota samples in the vicinity of 5 aquaculture locations along the Norwegian coast. Deltamethrin and cypermethrin were not detected above the limits of detection in any samples. Diflubenzuron, teflubenzuron and emamectin benzoate were detected, and the data was compared the UK Environmental Quality Standards. The concentrations of emamectin benzoate detected in sediments exceed the environmental quality standard (EQS) on 5 occasions in this study. The EQS for teflubenzuron in sediment was exceeded in 67% of the samples and exceeded for diflubenzuron in 40% of the water samples collected. A crude assessment of the levels detected in the shrimp collected from one location and the levels at which chronic effects are seen in shrimp would suggest that there is a potential risk to shrimp. It would also be reasonable to extrapolate this to any species that undergoes moulting during its life cycle.


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John Bostock's curator insight, June 7, 1:44 PM

The significance of these findings will no doubt be disputed, but substantial use of pesticides in the marine environment is not desirable. It was good therefore to see the innovations from Aqua Pharma  in treatment delivery and control.at the recent Aquaculture UK exhibition. 

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Reducing sea lice re-infestation risk from harvest water at a salmon farm site in Ireland using a bespoke sieving and filtration system

Reducing sea lice re-infestation risk from harvest water at a salmon farm site in Ireland using a bespoke sieving and filtration system | Aquaculture Directory | Scoop.it

Water samples from the harvest water outflow of a salmon farm harvest line were sampled at different stages for the presence of sea lice before and after filtration to establish the quantity of sea lice that escaped back into the water column. During the processing of fish through the harvest line the mechanical abrasion experienced by the fish cause sea lice to be knocked off into the harvest outflow water, these lice have the potential to re-infest remaining stock on site. The use of two types of filtration systems at a harvesting site where in-situ culling is on-going reduces the risk of re-infestation. In this site the sieve system was particularly effective. The reduction in sea lice numbers achieved by filtering discharge water using sieves was 89.5% using 1 mm screens and was over 99% using 80 μm filters.


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John Bostock's curator insight, May 11, 4:02 PM

Straightforward but effective...

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Atypical furunculosis (Aeromonas salmonicida atypical) in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar), Case 2013-2014: Macroscopic Pathology

Atypical furunculosis (Aeromonas salmonicida atypical) in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar), Case 2013-2014: Macroscopic Pathology | Aquaculture Directory | Scoop.it

Atypical Furunculosis is a bacterial infection caused by Aeromonas salmonicidaatypical in Chile affecting the Atlantic salmon ( Salmo salar ) in the growth phase in freshwater and seawater. The first record of the disease in Chile was described in 1995 (Bravo, 2000).

 

The macroscopic clinical signs correspond to hemorrhagic septicemia, should be deemed as a differential diagnosis in bacterial and viral hemorrhagic diseases


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John Bostock's curator insight, January 29, 5:37 AM

Another sample pathology blog from Marcos Godoy (use translation engine if you don't read Spanish)

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The IPN virus in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L) – the correlation between acquired immunity and biomarkers for infection - NVH

The IPN virus in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L) – the correlation between acquired immunity and biomarkers for infection - NVH | Aquaculture Directory | Scoop.it

A PhD project carried out at the Norwegian School of Veterinary Science has studied immunity to IPN in salmon by using different injected vaccines. The study focused particularly on the identification of biological markers as a measure of immunity to IPN.

 

In his doctoral research project, Hetron Mweemba Munang’andu compared the use of traditional vaccines (based on whole, inactivated viruses) against IPN with new ways of administering viral antigens, including plasmid vaccines, subunit vaccines and nanoparticle vaccines. His results show that traditional, inactivated vaccines are more effective than vaccines made by molecular biological methods.


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Triploid and diploid Atlantic salmon show similar susceptibility to infection with salmon lice Lepeophtheirus salmonis - Frenzl - Pest Management Science - Wiley Online Library

Triploid and diploid Atlantic salmon show similar susceptibility to infection with salmon lice Lepeophtheirus salmonis - Frenzl - Pest Management Science - Wiley Online Library | Aquaculture Directory | Scoop.it

Sea lice infection is the most expensive disease factor for Atlantic salmon sea-cage farming. For triploid salmon to be accepted as a commercial possibility, investigation of susceptibility of triploid salmon to sea lice infection is a fundamental milestone. The susceptibility of diploid and triploid salmon to infection with Lepeophtheirus salmonis was examined in a tank trial in Scotland, a tank trial in Norway and a cage trial in Scotland.Results

Following a single infection challenge, results indicated a significant correlation between fish size and the number of attached sea lice. Triploid fish were larger than diploids at the smolt stage. In the tank trials, no difference was found between infection levels on diploids and triploids after a single infection challenge. The tank trial in Scotland continued with a second infection challenge of the same fish, which also showed no infection differences between ploidies. A borderline correlation between first infection and re-infection intensity was found for PIT-tagged diploid salmon examined after each challenge. No significant difference in louse infection between diploid and triploid salmon (~2 kg) was found in the cage trial undertaken under commercial conditions.

Conclusion

This study concludes that triploid Atlantic salmon are not more susceptible to sea louse infection than diploid fish.


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Using Mussels to Protect Salmon against Amoebic Gill Disease

Using Mussels to Protect Salmon against Amoebic Gill Disease | Aquaculture Directory | Scoop.it
UK - The use of shellfish and seaweed to consume waste produced by fish farms, particularly in farms attached to other ocean structures is being researched as a means for improving and protecting the marine environment.

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John Bostock's curator insight, June 7, 3:02 PM

Early stage results, but could have interesting implications

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Scottish Government - An Assessment of the Benefits to Scotland of Aquaculture

Scottish Government - An Assessment of the Benefits to Scotland of Aquaculture | Aquaculture Directory | Scoop.it

A New independent report shows the Scottish aquaculture industry ‘provides considerable benefits for fragile economic areas’  contributing up to £1.4 billion to Scottish economy.

 

"The report commissioned by Marine Scotland and the Highlands and Islands Enterprise has been published by Imani and SRSL. 

 

The economic benefits from the industry are wide ranging and are felt across Scotland including areas that are not traditionally associated with it such as the Central Belt.

 

The report estimates that if the 2020 industry production target of 223,000 tonnes is met it could have a turn-over value of £2 billion to the Scottish economy and support 10,000 jobs.

 

Other findings include:

Direct production alone contributed a turn-over of at least £550 million to the Scottish economy and 2,800 jobs in 2012Including added income across the country the industry is currently estimated to contribute a turn-over of £1.4 billion and 8,000 jobs in ScotlandSignificant improvements have been made to the environmental impact of the industry and compares well with other animal production industriesQuality and high value is Scottish aquaculture’s trump card"


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John Bostock's curator insight, May 20, 10:22 AM

This may be a bit parochial, but a welcome study on the Scottish Aquaculture Industry that will provide good insight into the industry and economic factors for all students of aquaculture

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SLICE: A Sustainable Treatment Against Sea Lice

SLICE: A Sustainable Treatment Against Sea Lice | Aquaculture Directory | Scoop.it
ANALYSIS - Robin Wardle, Global strategic Marketing Director and Chris Haacke, Global Marketing Director, MSD Animal Health talk to Lucy Towers, TheFishSite.com Editor about MSD's sustainable sea lice treatment, SLICE.

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Gill diseases in seawater-farmed salmon have multiple causes and lead to substantial losses - NVH

Gill diseases in seawater-farmed salmon have multiple causes and lead to substantial losses - NVH | Aquaculture Directory | Scoop.it

Gill diseases in salmon farmed at sea lead to huge losses in some years and occur particularly in the autumn in salmon that has been released into the sea in the spring. Agnar Kvellestad's PhD thesis shows how several different causes play a role in the development of these diseases.


One of the diseases, proliferative gill inflammation (PGI) was identified in the 1980s. The biggest losses resulting from PGI have been in South West Norway. The causes have been partially identified, but more knowledge is needed so that preventive measures can be implemented to a larger degree than has been possible up until now. By using light microscopy (histology), Kvellestad describes in detail the changes that occur in cases of PGI disease. PGI has several causes. In this study, a number of different pathogenic organisms were found in the gills of fish suffering from the disease. The study also appraises the effect of environmental factors.


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John Bostock's curator insight, January 19, 5:33 AM

A very useful contribution to a better understanding of gill disease in salmon.

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Surface water is a key factor in the transmission of pancreas disease in salmon - NVH

Surface water is a key factor in the transmission of pancreas disease in salmon - NVH | Aquaculture Directory | Scoop.it

Anne Stene's PhD thesis explains how environmental factors affect the outbreak and transmission of pancreas disease (PD) in farmed salmon.

Both infected and dead salmon can shed the salmonid pancreas disease virus into the sea and the virus particles can be spread by the wind and ocean currents from one fish farm to the next along the coast.


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John Bostock's curator insight, January 19, 5:13 AM

This looks a useful contribution to the understanding of PD epidemiology