Aquaculture Directory
52.9K views | +47 today
Follow
Aquaculture Directory
A new online directory for the Aquaculture Industry
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Aquaculturedirectory from ASEM Aquaculture Health
Scoop.it!

Drug resistance in sea lice: a threat to salmonid aquaculture: Trends in Parasitology

Drug resistance in sea lice: a threat to salmonid aquaculture: Trends in Parasitology | Aquaculture Directory | Scoop.it

New paper from Stian Mørch Aaen, Kari Olli Helgesen, Marit Jørgensen Bakke, Kiranpreet Kaur and Tor Einar Horsberg; Norwegian University of Life Sciences, School of Veterinary Science, Sea Lice Research Centre, Oslo, Norway Drug-resistant sea lice are emerging in several salmonid-producing countries.Of the five compound groups available, resistance has been reported towards three.Efforts are being put into investigating genetic markers, physiology and biochemistry.The sensitivity status of sea lice populations could thus be monitored more easily.

 

Sea lice are copepod ectoparasites with vast reproductive potential and affect a wide variety of fish species. The number of parasites causing morbidity is proportional to fish size. Natural low host density restricts massive parasite dispersal. However, expanded salmon farming has shifted the conditions in favor of the parasite. Salmon farms are often situated near wild salmonid migrating routes, with smolts being particularly vulnerable to sea lice infestation. In order to protect both farmed and wild salmonids passing or residing in the proximity of the farms, several measures are taken. Medicinal treatment of farmed fish has been the most predictable and efficacious, leading to extensive use of the available compounds. This has resulted in drug-resistant parasites occurring on farmed and possibly wild salmonids.


Via John Bostock
more...
John Bostock's curator insight, January 31, 2015 12:07 PM

Further useful insights into the problems of drug resistance when combating parasites

Rescooped by Aquaculturedirectory from ASEM Aquaculture Health
Scoop.it!

Journal of Invertebrate Pathology | Special Issue, (June, 2012) | Diseases in Aquatic Crustaceans: Problems and Solutions for Global Food Security

Journal of Invertebrate Pathology | Special Issue, (June, 2012) | Diseases in Aquatic Crustaceans: Problems and Solutions for Global Food Security | Aquaculture Directory | Scoop.it
The online version of Journal of Invertebrate Pathology at ScienceDirect.com, the world's leading platform for high quality peer-reviewed full-text journals.

Via John Bostock
more...
John Bostock's curator insight, September 3, 2013 5:24 PM

Excellent collection of review articles concerning the implications of crustacean diseases for aquatic food production and trade

Rescooped by Aquaculturedirectory from ASEM Aquaculture Health
Scoop.it!

Prebiotics as immunostimulants in aquaculture: A review

Prebiotics as immunostimulants in aquaculture: A review | Aquaculture Directory | Scoop.it

Fish & Shellfish Immunology 40 (1) 40-48

 

Prebiotics are indigestible fibers that increase beneficial gut commensal bacteria resulting in improvements of the host's health. The beneficial effects of prebiotics are due to the byproducts generated from their fermentation by gut commensal bacteria. In this review, the direct effects of prebiotics on the innate immune system of fish are discussed. Prebiotics, such as fructooligosaccharide, mannanoligosaccharide, inulin, or β-glucan, are called immunosaccharides. They directly enhance innate immune responses including: phagocytic activation, neutrophil activation, activation of the alternative complement system, increased lysozyme activity, and more. Immunosaccharides directly activate the innate immune system by interacting with pattern recognition receptors (PRR) expressed on innate immune cells. They can also associate with microbe associated molecular patterns (MAMPs) to activate innate immune cells. However, the underlying mechanisms involved in innate immune cell activation need to be further explored. Many studies have indicated that immunosaccharides are beneficial to both finfish and shellfish.

  


Via John Bostock
more...
John Bostock's curator insight, July 27, 2014 9:21 AM

This should be a helpful review for anyone wanting to know more about prebiotics for aquatic animals