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Bacterial Disease is Leading Cause of Mortality in Lumpfish

Bacterial Disease is Leading Cause of Mortality in Lumpfish | Aquaculture Directory | Scoop.it
NORWAY - A new study by the Fisheries and Aquaculture Industry Research Fund (FHF) has identified atypical furunculosis as the "worst offender" of bacterial diseases in lumpfish.

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blueAmp: Simple and rapid detection test for streptococcosis in Nile tilapia

blueAmp: Simple and rapid detection test for streptococcosis in Nile tilapia | Aquaculture Directory | Scoop.it

Streptococcosis is a major bacterial infection in many cultured fish species, damaging the production of intensive aquaculture species, particularly Nile tilapia. The infection is caused by Streptococcus agalactiae and Strep. Iniae. 

“blueAmp” has been developed as a simple and rapid assay to detect Strep. agalactiae and Strep. Iniae.  The assay is based on DNA amplification by loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) and a detection of DNA products by colorimetric change of hydroxynaphthol blue dye. The result can be observed by a color change through the naked eyes.  This method takes approximately an hour, which is significantly less than the time required by a standard test which can take upto 6 days.

“blueAmp” is useful for screening broodstock and fry before stocking and for monitoring fish health in grow-out pond.This technology is developed by Bioengineering and Sensing Technology Laboratory, and is being validated with industry before it becomes available for licensing.


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Aquaculture Magazine - Current status of shrimp diseases in Asia

Aquaculture Magazine - Current status of shrimp diseases in Asia | Aquaculture Directory | Scoop.it
Excerpt from Thirteenth Meeting of the Asia Regional Advisory Group on Aquatic Animal Health NETWORK OF AQUACULTURE CENTRES IN ASIA-PACIFIC 28 February 2015

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John Bostock's curator insight, July 23, 2015 3:53 PM

Nice overview by leading expert Tim Flegel 

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2015 5th International Conference of Aquaculture Indonesia

2015 5th International Conference of Aquaculture Indonesia | Aquaculture Directory | Scoop.it

October 29-31th, 2015 in Jakarta–Indonesia.

 

ICAI 2015 returns to be one of the favorite aquaculture meetings in Indonesia. This is the 5th event of ICAI which starting this year becomes the annual international forum for the aquaculture community - academics, researchers, students,  market and industry analysts, government officials, policy makers and industry representatives organized and hosted by Indonesian Aquaculture Society (MAI). This conference is designed to encourage the exchange of ideas, information and knowledge between scientists and industry personnels on important issues in aquaculture and how finding solutions and supporting to the industry. This conference will be a meeting forum and current information sharing between scientists and business actors in aquaculture coming from all over places in Asian Pacific and other countries.


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John Bostock's curator insight, June 20, 2015 10:51 AM

This conference includes sessions on aquatic animal health and environment as well as on feeds, genetics and other topics.

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Probiotics, immunostimulants, plant products and oral vaccines, and their role as feed supplements in the control of bacterial fish diseases - Newaj-Fyzul - 2014 - Journal of Fish Diseases

Probiotics, immunostimulants, plant products and oral vaccines, and their role as feed supplements in the control of bacterial fish diseases - Newaj-Fyzul - 2014 - Journal of Fish Diseases | Aquaculture Directory | Scoop.it

There is a rapidly increasing literature pointing to the success of probiotics, immunostimulants, plant products and oral vaccines in immunomodulation, namely stimulation of the innate, cellular and/or humoral immune response, and the control of bacterial fish diseases. Probiotics are regarded as live micro-organisms administered orally and leading to health benefits. However, in contrast with the use in terrestrial animals, a diverse range of micro-organisms have been evaluated in aquaculture with the mode of action often reflecting immunomodulation. Moreover, the need for living cells has been questioned. Also, key subcellular components, including lipopolysaccharides, have been attributed to the beneficial effect in fish. Here, there is a link with immunostimulants, which may also be administered orally. Furthermore, numerous plant products have been reported to have health benefits, namely protection against disease for which stimulation of some immune parameters has been reported. Oral vaccines confer protection against some diseases, although the mode of action is usually linked to humoral rather than the innate and cellular immune responses. This review explores the relationship between probiotics, immunostimulants, plant products and oral vaccines.

 


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John Bostock's curator insight, November 12, 2014 1:28 PM

An interesting review article taking a broader perspective on probiotics and immunostimulants.

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9th Symposium on Diseases on Asian Aquaculture (DAA9) - EMS/AHPND Special Session Announced

9th Symposium on Diseases on Asian Aquaculture (DAA9) - EMS/AHPND Special Session Announced | Aquaculture Directory | Scoop.it

The Organizers of DAA9 will convene a special session on shrimp EMS/AHPND. If you want to know the latest on this emerging shrimp disease and become part of the Fish Health Section (FHS) of the Asian Fisheries Society (AFS) network, don’t miss this opportunity.

Prof Tim Flegel will facilitate the session in collaboration with FHS (AFS) and DAH (MARD) with an opening presentation titled “EMS/AHPND: a game changer for the future development of aquaculture”. This will be followed by presentations from other invited speakers and speakers selected from submitted abstracts. Prof Lightner, Dr Gomez-Gill, Dr Hirono, Prof Grace Lo and Prof Sorgeloos have confirmed making presentations at this session. We are expecting many more presentations from leading researchers from within and outside this region. The scope of the session will be broad and cover sequencing and analysis of genomic and epigenomic DNA of AHPND isolates; pathology, epidemiology and control; plus ongoing regional/international initiatives in Asia Pacific for dealing with the disease. The session will be  part of the 5 day DAA9 event and is open to all DAA9 registered delegates.


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John Bostock's curator insight, July 26, 2014 12:19 PM

This will be a very well attended event!

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Eroded swimmeret syndrome, a novel disease of the signal crayfish - University of Eastern Finland

Eroded swimmeret syndrome, a novel disease of the signal crayfish - University of Eastern Finland | Aquaculture Directory | Scoop.it

Crayfish researchers at the University of Eastern Finland Department of Biology have discovered, together with Swedish colleagues, a new disease plaguing female signal crayfish. As the name suggests, eroded swimmeret syndrome (ESS) destroys the swimmerets of female crayfish, weakens their reproductive ability and can increase the mortality of mother crayfish. In Finland and Sweden, the observed declines and sudden plunges in natural populations of signal crayfish can, to some extent, be explained by eroded swimmeret syndrome.

SYMPTOMS CAUSED BY A FUNGUS

For a couple of years now, eroded swimmeret syndrome has been observed in female signal crayfish in both Finland and Sweden. Over the past year, the syndrome has been a target of intense research, and it has been discovered that female signal crayfish weakened by crayfish plague can contract eroded swimmeret syndrome. Molecular biological studies show that the erosion of the swimmerets and the actual symptoms are caused by a fungus of the Fusarium genus.

suu, Kuopio, Savonlinna

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John Bostock's curator insight, July 26, 2014 10:19 AM

More bad news for Scandinavian crayfish lovers 

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Recent insights into host–pathogen interaction in white spot syndrome virus infected penaeid shrimp - Shekhar - 2014 - Journal of Fish Diseases

Recent insights into host–pathogen interaction in white spot syndrome virus infected penaeid shrimp - Shekhar - 2014 - Journal of Fish Diseases | Aquaculture Directory | Scoop.it

Viral disease outbreaks are a major concern impeding the development of the shrimp aquaculture industry. The viral disease due to white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) observed in early 1990s still continues unabated affecting the shrimp farms and cause huge economic loss to the shrimp aquaculture industry. In the absence of effective therapeutics to control WSSV, it is important to understand viral pathogenesis and shrimp response to WSSV at the molecular level. Identification and molecular characterization of WSSV proteins and receptors may facilitate in designing and development of novel therapeutics and antiviral drugs that may inhibit viral replication. Investigations into host–pathogen interactions might give new insights to viral infectivity, tissue tropism and defence mechanism elicited in response to WSSV infection. However, due to the limited information on WSSV gene function and host immune response, the signalling pathways which are associated in shrimp pathogen interaction have also not been elucidated completely. In the present review, the focus is on those shrimp proteins and receptors that are potentially involved in virus infection or in the defence mechanism against WSSV. In addition, the major signalling pathways involved in the innate immune response and the role of apoptosis in host–pathogen interaction is discussed.


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EMS Survey Now Available Online

EMS Survey Now Available Online | Aquaculture Directory | Scoop.it

The Global Aquaculture Alliance (GAA) is calling on shrimp farms in Asia and Latin America to fill out a survey designed to collect information on early mortality syndrome (EMS). The survey is now available online, the organization announced on June 19.

 

This comprehensive survey is the crux of a GAA case study launched in March to identify the practices that prevent and/or manage EMS at shrimp farms. The study will act as a foundation for recommendations to the global aquaculture community for better shrimp-farming practices.

 

The study will be conducted in two phases. The first phase consists of the survey. All shrimp farms in countries affected or threatened by EMS -- including China, Vietnam, Malaysia, Thailand, India and Mexico -- are encouraged to participate by completing an online form.

 


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John Bostock's curator insight, June 20, 2014 11:55 AM

For the attention of all shrimp farmers!

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Using Mussels to Protect Salmon against Amoebic Gill Disease

Using Mussels to Protect Salmon against Amoebic Gill Disease | Aquaculture Directory | Scoop.it
UK - The use of shellfish and seaweed to consume waste produced by fish farms, particularly in farms attached to other ocean structures is being researched as a means for improving and protecting the marine environment.

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John Bostock's curator insight, June 7, 2014 6:02 PM

Early stage results, but could have interesting implications

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EMS Update: Impacts Continue, But Industry Gaining Against Disease

EMS Update: Impacts Continue, But Industry Gaining Against Disease | Aquaculture Directory | Scoop.it

Global Aquaculture Alliance President George Chamberlain recently reported that as early mortality syndrome (EMS) continues to take a toll on the global shrimp-farming sector, advancing knowledge is progressively leading toward improved practices and better control of the disease.

 

In his May 20 presentation to members of the National Fisheries Institute Shrimp Council, Chamberlain updated the EMS status of primary production areas and passed on recommendations for management methods to reduce the impacts of EMS.


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John Bostock's curator insight, May 23, 2014 11:58 AM

Latest update on activities to address this significant shrimp disease problem.

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PmVRP15, a Novel Viral Responsive Protein from the Black Tiger Shrimp Promoted White Spot Syndrome Virus Replication

PmVRP15, a Novel Viral Responsive Protein from the Black Tiger Shrimp Promoted White Spot Syndrome Virus Replication | Aquaculture Directory | Scoop.it

The novel proteins that are up-regulated in shrimps following WSSV infection are typically viewed as interesting molecules to characterize their function in the shrimp immune system. For example, the novel viral responsive protein, hemocyte homeostasis-associated protein (HHAP), was found to be highly up-regulated at both the transcript and protein levels in WSSV-infected shrimp hemocytes. Silencing of this gene in Penaeus monodon (PmHHAP) by dsRNA-interference (RNAi) caused damage to shrimp hemocytes and a severe decrease in their numbers, suggesting the important role of PmHHAP in hemocyte homeostasis. Suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) and microarray analyses (our unpublished data) of WSSV-challenged P. monodon hemocytes identified the novel viral responsive protein (VRP) PmVRP15 as one of the most highly up-regulated genes in the acute phase of WSSV-infected hemocytes. Herein, we attempt to characterize the function of PmVRP15 from P. monodon by RNAi-mediated gene silencing. Fluorescence-labeling along with confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) was used to examine the localization of PmVRP15 in shrimp hemocytes. Overall, the likely importance of this novel protein in promoting viral propagation was suggested. - 

 

The cDNA of a novel viral responsive gene from the black tiger shrimp (P. monodon), PmVRP15, was cloned and sequenced to acquire the full-length cDNA coding sequence. Expression analysis showed PmVRP15 transcripts were mainly found in hemocytes and along with the PmVRP15 protein were highly up-regulated in WSSV-infected hemocytes. PmVRP15 protein was localized at or near the nuclear membrane of uninfected and WSSV-infected shrimp hemocytes. After RNAi-mediated PmVRP15 suppression, WSSV propagation and shrimp mortality were markedly decreased. The function of PmVRP15 is unknown but it possibly plays a role in WSSV propagation in shrimp hemocyte.


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John Bostock's curator insight, April 29, 2014 12:14 PM

Featured Article at "The Fish Site"

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Concentration of Infectious Aquatic Rhabdoviruses from Freshwater and Seawater Using Ultrafiltration

Concentration of Infectious Aquatic Rhabdoviruses from Freshwater and Seawater Using Ultrafiltration | Aquaculture Directory | Scoop.it
(2011). Concentration of Infectious Aquatic Rhabdoviruses from Freshwater and Seawater Using Ultrafiltration. Journal of Aquatic Animal Health: Vol. 23, No. 4, pp. 218-223. doi: 10.1080/08997659.2011.644412

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John Bostock's curator insight, March 22, 2014 6:41 PM

This looks a very useful technique, and is an open access article

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Draft Genome Sequence of Non-Vibrio parahaemolyticus Acute Hepatopancreatic Necrosis Disease Strain KC13.17.5, Isolated from Diseased Shrimp in Vietnam

Draft Genome Sequence of Non-Vibrio parahaemolyticus Acute Hepatopancreatic Necrosis Disease Strain KC13.17.5, Isolated from Diseased Shrimp in Vietnam | Aquaculture Directory | Scoop.it

A strain of Vibrio (KC13.17.5) causing acute hepatopancreatic necrosis disease (AHPND) in shrimp in northern Vietnam was isolated. Normally, AHPND is caused by Vibrio parahaemolyticus, but the genomic sequence of the strain indicated that it belonged to Vibrio harveyi. The sequence data included plasmid-like sequences and putative virulence genes.


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John Bostock's curator insight, November 7, 2015 2:15 PM

The plot thickens further!

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Disease In Tropical Aquatic Animals Masterclass - JCU

Disease In Tropical Aquatic Animals Masterclass - JCU | Aquaculture Directory | Scoop.it

This is a 12-day intensive course delivered by six leading researchers in aquaculture, biomedical sciences and marine and environmental sciences. It is being held at the James Cook University, Townsville, Australia from 11-23 January 2016. The course fee is AUS$ 3000 which includes accommodation, breakfasts, lunches, all tuition, materials and transfers.


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Aquaculturedirectory's insight:

This looks a good opportunity for anyone able to participate

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John Bostock's curator insight, August 6, 2015 11:03 AM

This looks a good opportunity for anyone able to participate

John Bostock's curator insight, August 6, 2015 11:05 AM

This looks a good opportunity for anyone able to participate

Charlie Dare's curator insight, August 7, 2015 10:42 PM

This looks a good opportunity for anyone able to participate

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Naturally concurrent infections of bacterial and viral pathogens in disease outbreaks in cultured Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) farms

Naturally concurrent infections of bacterial and viral pathogens in disease outbreaks in cultured Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) farms | Aquaculture Directory | Scoop.it

Ha Thanh Dong et al. Aquacuture - doi:10.1016/j.aquaculture.2015.06.027 

 

The reality of dead-loss in cultured fish farms due to multiple pathogen infections probably outweighs single infection. Here, we describe the isolation and characterization of the potential pathogens concurrently infected in natural disease outbreaks of Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) and their pathogenicity in the red tilapia fingerling model. Co-infection of bacteria and Iridovirus was found in two affected farms. Based on conventional phenotypic tests and sequence analysis of 16S rDNA fragment, most predominant bacteria were identified as Flavobacterium columnare and Aeromonas veronii, and remainders were Streptococcus agalactiae, Plesiomonas shigeloides andVibrio cholerae. Experimental infection with selected single bacterial isolates demonstrated that both alpha- and beta-hemolytic A. veronii isolates were highly pathogenic to tilapia fingerling, whereas F. columnare and S. agalactiae were less virulent and P. shigeloides was avirulent. The fish exposed to A. veronii or F. columnaremimicked major internal and external clinical signs of naturally infected fish respectively. This suggests that A. veronii and F. columnare are two main pathogens co-responsible for the dead-loss of cultured tilapia farms in the present study, whereas remaining pathogens might serve as opportunistic pathogens in the disease outbreaks.


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A two tube, nested PCR detection method for AHPND bacteria - News

A two tube, nested PCR detection method for AHPND bacteria - News | Aquaculture Directory | Scoop.it

A new method for the detection of AHPND bacteria AP4 has been published. The advantage of the AP4 method over the previously published AP3 method is that the it has 100 times higher sensitivity. Because of its higher sensitivity, the bacterial culture enrichment step needed when using the AP3 with low levels of AHPND bacteria may be omitted. However, the AP4 method should not be considered as a replacement for the AP3 method but simply as an alternative choice for the users to choose should they need a more sensitive detection method.

 

The AP4 PCR method was developed entirely by Thai scientists working in Thailand at Centex Shrimp,the Shrimp-virus interaction laboratory, BIOTEC and Aquatic Animal Health Research Center and Charoen Pokphand Co. Ltd. It was also supported entirely by research funding from Thailand. 


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John Bostock's curator insight, March 10, 2015 6:13 AM

Sorry - a little late spotting and publishing this.

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Identification of Genes Involved in Taura Syndrome Virus Resistance in Litopenaeus Vannamei

Identification of Genes Involved in Taura Syndrome Virus Resistance in Litopenaeus Vannamei | Aquaculture Directory | Scoop.it

Boube et al (2014). Identification of Genes Involved in Taura Syndrome Virus Resistance in Litopenaeus Vannamei. Journal of Aquatic Animal Health: Vol. 26, No. 3, pp. 137-143.

 

The goal of the present research was to identify the genes that are differentially expressed between two lineages of Pacific white shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei displaying different susceptibilities to Taura syndrome virus (TSV) and to understand the molecular pathways involved in resistance to the disease. An oligonucleotide microarray was constructed and used to identify several genes that were differentially expressed in the two L. vannamei lineages following infection with TSV. Individual L. vannamei from either resistant or susceptible lineages were exposed via injection to TSV. Individuals were removed at 6 and 24 h postinfection, and gene expression was assessed with the in-house microarray. The microarray data resulted in the selection of a set of 397 genes that were altered by TSV exposure between the different lineages. Significantly differentially expressed genes were subjected to hierarchical clustering and revealed a lineage-dependent clustering at 24 h postinoculation, but not at 6 h postinoculation. Discriminant analysis resulted in the identification of a set of 11 genes that were able to correctly classify Pacific white shrimp as resistant or susceptible based on gene expression data.


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John Bostock's curator insight, September 1, 2014 1:32 PM

This looks like useful progress for future management of TSV

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Fish hospital to come up at Thevara

Fish hospital to come up at Thevara | Aquaculture Directory | Scoop.it

KOCHI: The city is gearing up to set up the first aquatic animal hospital in the government sector. An Aquatic Animal Health and Environment Management Laboratory will come up on the premises of the Fishermen Training Centre at Thevara under the  Agency for Development of Aquaculture, Kerala (ADAK). The state government has accorded sanction for `1.12 cr for it. The total amount for the project is `1.68cr, the rest of the amount will be provided by National Fisheries Development Board. The construction work will be carried out by Ernakulam Nirmithi Kendra which is expected to begin soon.

“The centre is envisaged as a virtual research and support centre for fish farmers and as a ‘Hospital for Fish’ to address various diseases cropping up in fish species, which are being reported seasonally from various parts of the country. The hospital will be able to regularly monitor the occurrence of diseases and evolve effective strategies for health management for aqua culturists. The lab will also play an important role in quarantine and disease-free certification of ornamental fish,” sources said.  

The laboratory will act as a support component for all hatcheries and farms both in the government and private sector to test the quality of fish seed.

Experts pointed out that since the significance of aquaculture is rapidly increasing in the state, the establishment of such a laboratory is relevant. It is estimated that around 400 aquaculture farmers across the state will be benefited from the facility.

The laboratory will function as a monitoring and surveillance centre for diseases affecting fishes and aquatic organisms, including shrimps, fresh water prawn and farming fishes. The centre will be able to test the pollution levels of water. It will maintain registers pertaining to the details of farmers, samples given for testing, tests undertaken and results. These can be used for further aquaculture research, sources said.


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John Bostock's curator insight, July 26, 2014 12:12 PM

Wishing this initiative every success.

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Updated information on a "new disease" in rainbow trout - Norwegian Veterinary Institute

Updated information on a "new disease" in rainbow trout - Norwegian Veterinary Institute | Aquaculture Directory | Scoop.it

In late August 2013 the Norwegian Veterinary Institute (NVI) received the first case of diseased rainbow trout from a hatchery. The signs of disease were unusual for fish at this age. The second and third cases were submitted to the NVI during October and primo November. The most recent hatchery affected by this disease was recorded in January 2014. Diseased fish were sized from 30 – 100 g. One hatchery reported high mortality in some pens. The other affected sites reported moderate mortalities.  


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John Bostock's curator insight, July 3, 2014 9:33 AM

Information on an emerging disease issue in Norway

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The tidepool shrimp, Palaemon ritteri Holmes, constitutes a novel host to the white spot syndrome virus - Sánchez-Paz - 2014 - Journal of Fish Diseases

The tidepool shrimp, Palaemon ritteri Holmes, constitutes a novel host to the white spot syndrome virus - Sánchez-Paz - 2014 - Journal of Fish Diseases | Aquaculture Directory | Scoop.it

The white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) is a lethal and contagious pathogen for penaeid shrimp and a growing number of other crustacean species. To date, there are no effective prophylactic or therapeutic treatments commercially available to interfere with the occurrence and spread of the disease. In addition, the significance of alternative vectors on the dispersal of this disease has been largely ignored and therefore the ecological dynamics of the WSSV is still poorly understood and difficult to ascertain. Thus, an important issue that should be considered in sanitary programmes and management strategies is the identification of species susceptible to infection by WSSV. The results obtained provide the first direct evidence of ongoing WSSV replication in experimentally infected specimens of the tidepool shrimp Palaemon ritteri. Viral replication was detected using a validated set of primers for the amplification by RT-PCR of a 141 bp fragment of the transcript encoding the viral protein VP28. It is therefore conceivable that this shrimp may play a significant role in the dispersal of WSSV.


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Alternative invention for shrimp bacterial pathogens wins patent - The Times of India

Alternative invention for shrimp bacterial pathogens wins patent - The Times of India | Aquaculture Directory | Scoop.it

Drug-resistant bacteria and antibiotic residues have become a global concern in the shrimp industry. These two problems have been addressed with a single invention by a scientist from the College of Fisheries (CoF) here and it has been granted patent by Patent Office of Government of India. 

Dr Indrani Karunasagar, director, UNESCO Centre for marine Biotechnology and Associate Director of Research, has received the patent for ``the process of preparing a consortium of bacteriophages for controlling luminous bacterial disease in shrimp larvae.'' Like a virus, a lytic bacteriophage is a virus that infects and replicates within the bacteria and kills it. 


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John Bostock's curator insight, June 9, 2014 10:13 AM

Congratulations to Dr Karunasagar and best wishes for further development of the therapy...

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Inbreeding and disease in tropical shrimp aquaculture: a reappraisal and caution

Inbreeding and disease in tropical shrimp aquaculture: a reappraisal and caution | Aquaculture Directory | Scoop.it

NACA recommends that anyone involved in shrimp aquaculture - particularly hatcheries but also anyone procuring PL - read a paper by Roger Doyle, recently published in Aquaculture Research which discusses the link between inbreeding and disease in tropical shrimp aquaculture:

 

"The disease crisis facing shrimp aquaculture may be propelled, in part, by an interaction between management practices that cause inbreeding, and the amplification by inbreeding of susceptibility to disease and environmental stresses. The study describes and numerically simulates gene flow from Penaeus (Litopenaeus) vannamei hatcheries that employ a ‘Breeder Lock’ to discourage use of their PL as breeders, through ‘copy hatcheries’ that breed the locked PL, to inbred shrimp in farm ponds. Re-analysis of published data shows that inbreeding depression under stress is exceptionally strong in shrimp. Inbreeding is currently overlooked as a problem because: (1) procedures recommended for well-managed hatcheries do not consider their implications for the copy hatcheries that supply most farmed shrimp (estimated 70%), (2) inbreeding in hatcheries is often reported as zero even though zero is the mathematical expectation of the usual estimator (Fis, fixation index) whatever the true genealogy of the broodstock. Simulation shows, however, that inbreeding can be estimated with Wang's trioML estimator, that Fis can differentiate Breeder Locked from copy PL and that simple tests can verify the lock status of PL. The importance of inbreeding should be re-evaluated in the context of disease and environmental stress. Unrecognized inbreeding may increase the incidence, prevalence and lethality of WSSV, IHHNV, EMS (AHPND) and other diseases."

 

DOI: 10.1111/are.12472


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John Bostock's curator insight, May 24, 2014 4:39 AM

Interesting and challenging paper.

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EMS Spreads to Central East China

EMS Spreads to Central East China | Aquaculture Directory | Scoop.it

From Shrimpnews.com:

In March 2014, white shrimp (Penaeus vannamei) began dying shortly after being stocked in shrimp ponds around Ningbo, a city in the central province of Zhejiang.

 

The Ningbo Ocean and Fishery Bureau recruited So Huang Jie, an expert in the prevention and treatment of shrimp diseases, to diagnose the problem.  Huang came to the conclusion that the mortalities were caused by EMS or Early Mortality Syndrome, which, previously, had not occurred that far north.  The disease struck ponds covered with greenhouses, causing great concern among other farmers getting ready to stock their outdoor ponds.  Seedstock, purchased in southern China, was suspected of carrying the disease to the ponds.  Recognized seedstock brands seemed to result in a much lower incidence of EMS than off-brands.  Polyculture of shrimp with fish or turtles decreased the incidence of EMS.


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John Bostock's curator insight, May 1, 2014 6:19 AM

Bad news for China

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World Aquaculture Adelaide 2014 Special session on regional cooperation for improved biosecurity

World Aquaculture Adelaide 2014 Special session on regional cooperation for improved biosecurity | Aquaculture Directory | Scoop.it

A special session on regional cooperation for improved biosecurity will be held at World Aquaculture Adelaide 2014, which runs from 7-11 June. The special session will be held on 11 June from 9am to 12:30pm.

The special session will be organised into three sub-sessions:

Regional cooperation in aquatic animal health management: The rationale, trans-boundary nature of aquatic animal diseases, current aquaculture practices and global trade, what has been done and accomplished, where are the gaps, what needs to be done and the way forward. Presenters will include Dr Brett Herbert (Department of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries) and Dr Eduardo Leano (NACA).Dealing with emerging diseases - focus on shrimp acute hepatopancreatic necrosis disease (“EMS”): Why do new disease emerge? Can we predict disease emergence in aquatic systems? What have we learnt from emerging diseases in the region? Updates on AHPNS including primary pathogens, geographical spread, and the latest on diagnostics and management interventions. Presenters will include Peter Walker (CSIRO) and Siripong Thitamadee (Mahidol University).Domestication programmes and disease emergence / management: Concept of domestication and breeding programmes, implications of genetic diversity, disease susceptibility and resistance, dependence of the Asian shrimp industry on SPF P. vannamei. Are we heading on the right path and should there be regional efforts for domestication of native species? What are the implications for disease occurrence and production? Presenters will include Dr Greg Coman (CSIRO) and Prof. Roger Doyle (Genetic Computation Ltd.).

Discussion panels will be held after the sub-theme presentations to allow participants to interact with the presenters. The session will bring together industry and scientists performing agricultural research and development to discuss closer cooperation in health management and biosecurity. In particular, it will raise awareness of the link between genetic erosion and disease, an issue which has not been previously investigated or addressed by the aquaculture community. This is a foundation issue that must be addressed in domestication and genetic improvement programmes for prominent aquaculture species.


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John Bostock's curator insight, April 29, 2014 9:50 AM

It looks as if WAS 2014 is going to be an excellent event.