Aquaculture Directory
48.9K views | +69 today
Follow
Aquaculture Directory
A new online directory for the Aquaculture Industry
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Aquaculturedirectory from ASEM Aquaculture Health
Scoop.it!

Genetic variation for resistance to WSS, AHPND in Pacific white shrimp | The Advocate

Genetic variation for resistance to WSS, AHPND in Pacific white shrimp | The Advocate | Aquaculture Directory | Scoop.it

White spot syndrome (WSS) and acute hepatopancreatic necrosis disease (AHPND) have become the main causes of economic loss in shrimp production worldwide. Prevention of these diseases is very difficult to achieve, and efforts to control them have often seen inconsistent results. Moreover, some intensive production systems seem to favor their rapid spread.

In such scenarios, breeding for disease resistance is a viable option to deal with this issue in commercial shrimp culture. Breeding shrimp for disease resistance is worthwhile when there are no other simple, cost-effective control measures, and there are genetic differences for resistance to the pathogen.


Via John Bostock
more...
John Bostock's curator insight, October 4, 2015 5:34 AM

Good to see this research ongoing - clearly challenging though.

Rescooped by Aquaculturedirectory from Aqua-tnet
Scoop.it!

Investing in the human capital of the aquatic food sector: AQUA-TNET and the road ahead - Online First - Springer

Investing in the human capital of the aquatic food sector: AQUA-TNET and the road ahead - Online First - Springer | Aquaculture Directory | Scoop.it

By John Bostock & Sónia Seixas.

Global aquaculture production now provides around 50 % of human seafood consumption and with expected population growth and increased per capita seafood consumption, production is expected to rise from the current 63 million tonnes to almost 100 million tonnes by 2030. In contrast, aquaculture production in the European Union is relatively low, having more or less stagnated since 2000, despite the EU being the largest global importer of seafood. However, a new strategy for aquaculture development is in place with every EU Member State committed to preparing a national plan. This will involve greater focus on current constraints and issues that need to be overcome through innovation and engagement with a wide range of stakeholders. This will require the input of research, knowledge exchange and human capacity building. The AQUA-TNET thematic network for lifelong learning in aquaculture, fisheries and aquatic resource management has brought together European organisations engaged in these activities since it first started in 1996. This paper aims to present some of the analyses and thinking of that network in relation to the role of education and training in strengthening the human capital of the European aquaculture sector as a contribution to overall sector development. The approach is therefore that of a review article, drawing on a diverse range of previous work to identify themes and trends to help inform future research and activities. Further and higher education institutions play a partial but nonetheless significant role in aquaculture sector development. When considering future contributions to the sector, account needs to be taken of the changes taking place within the tertiary education sector as new technologies, global competition and government policies challenge the status quo of current organisation and practice. Though these present risks, they also offer considerable opportunities to build new collaborations, adopt new patterns of teaching and learning and perhaps apply new frameworks for accrediting learning and skills that could benefit the aquaculture sector. With funding from the European Commission Lifelong Learning Programme for AQUA-TNET having come to an end in 2014, future work of the network in promoting and enabling innovation will need to be reconfigured around other types of sector organisations. It may also be the right time to look towards a more global platform for aquaculture education and knowledge exchange.


Via John Bostock
more...
John Bostock's curator insight, May 18, 2015 11:30 AM

The final article in the Aquaculture International AQUA-TNET special edition is now available from Springer - looking more to the future of both education and aqua-tnet.

Rescooped by Aquaculturedirectory from ASEM Aquaculture Health
Scoop.it!

Probiotics, immunostimulants, plant products and oral vaccines, and their role as feed supplements in the control of bacterial fish diseases - Newaj-Fyzul - 2014 - Journal of Fish Diseases

Probiotics, immunostimulants, plant products and oral vaccines, and their role as feed supplements in the control of bacterial fish diseases - Newaj-Fyzul - 2014 - Journal of Fish Diseases | Aquaculture Directory | Scoop.it

There is a rapidly increasing literature pointing to the success of probiotics, immunostimulants, plant products and oral vaccines in immunomodulation, namely stimulation of the innate, cellular and/or humoral immune response, and the control of bacterial fish diseases. Probiotics are regarded as live micro-organisms administered orally and leading to health benefits. However, in contrast with the use in terrestrial animals, a diverse range of micro-organisms have been evaluated in aquaculture with the mode of action often reflecting immunomodulation. Moreover, the need for living cells has been questioned. Also, key subcellular components, including lipopolysaccharides, have been attributed to the beneficial effect in fish. Here, there is a link with immunostimulants, which may also be administered orally. Furthermore, numerous plant products have been reported to have health benefits, namely protection against disease for which stimulation of some immune parameters has been reported. Oral vaccines confer protection against some diseases, although the mode of action is usually linked to humoral rather than the innate and cellular immune responses. This review explores the relationship between probiotics, immunostimulants, plant products and oral vaccines.

 


Via John Bostock
more...
John Bostock's curator insight, November 12, 2014 1:28 PM

An interesting review article taking a broader perspective on probiotics and immunostimulants.

Rescooped by Aquaculturedirectory from Aqua-tnet
Scoop.it!

Evaluation on the use of e-learning tools to support teaching and learning in aquaculture and aquatic sciences education - Online First - Springer

Evaluation on the use of e-learning tools to support teaching and learning in aquaculture and aquatic sciences education - Online First - Springer | Aquaculture Directory | Scoop.it

The study aimed to capture a snapshot of the status of educational means used in teaching and learning in the area of aquaculture, fisheries and aquatic resources management at European level, with specific consideration on the use of information and communication technologies (ICT) and e-learning tools. To achieve this goal, an online survey was compiled and made available to teachers and students across Europe. In total, teachers from 31 institutions and students from 40 institutions participated in this survey. This paper presents the findings, considers trends and poses further questions for sector stakeholders to help in the development of future programmes and support. In summary, it can be concluded that few teachers have a comprehensive knowledge of the wide range of ICT tools available and can make use of e-learning tools with complete confidence. There is therefore a real and urgent need to “train the trainers” to use ICT in their teaching environments. From the students’ end, there is a strong desire to learn more about the application of e-learning tools and to use them in their learning process.


Via John Bostock
more...
John Bostock's curator insight, September 29, 2014 11:07 AM

A third article from the AQUA-TNET project examining the use of information and communication technologies and digital media in aquaculture education across Europe.

Rene Mejia's curator insight, September 30, 2014 10:23 AM

Herramientas de e-learning Aplicadas a Nuestra Vida #eduvm

Rescooped by Aquaculturedirectory from ASEM Aquaculture Health
Scoop.it!

Triploid and diploid Atlantic salmon show similar susceptibility to infection with salmon lice Lepeophtheirus salmonis - Frenzl - Pest Management Science - Wiley Online Library

Triploid and diploid Atlantic salmon show similar susceptibility to infection with salmon lice Lepeophtheirus salmonis - Frenzl - Pest Management Science - Wiley Online Library | Aquaculture Directory | Scoop.it

Sea lice infection is the most expensive disease factor for Atlantic salmon sea-cage farming. For triploid salmon to be accepted as a commercial possibility, investigation of susceptibility of triploid salmon to sea lice infection is a fundamental milestone. The susceptibility of diploid and triploid salmon to infection with Lepeophtheirus salmonis was examined in a tank trial in Scotland, a tank trial in Norway and a cage trial in Scotland.Results

Following a single infection challenge, results indicated a significant correlation between fish size and the number of attached sea lice. Triploid fish were larger than diploids at the smolt stage. In the tank trials, no difference was found between infection levels on diploids and triploids after a single infection challenge. The tank trial in Scotland continued with a second infection challenge of the same fish, which also showed no infection differences between ploidies. A borderline correlation between first infection and re-infection intensity was found for PIT-tagged diploid salmon examined after each challenge. No significant difference in louse infection between diploid and triploid salmon (~2 kg) was found in the cage trial undertaken under commercial conditions.

Conclusion

This study concludes that triploid Atlantic salmon are not more susceptible to sea louse infection than diploid fish.


Via John Bostock
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Aquaculturedirectory from ASEM Aquaculture Health
Scoop.it!

Economic impacts of aquatic parasites on global finfish production | The Advocate

Economic impacts of aquatic parasites on global finfish production | The Advocate | Aquaculture Directory | Scoop.it

Obligate and opportunistic parasites play a critical role in determining the productivity, sustainability and economic viability of global finfish aquaculture enterprises. Without stringent and appropriate control measures, the impacts of these pathogens can often be significant.

Estimating the true impacts of each parasite event, however, is complicated, as costs can be affected by a diverse assortment of environmental and management factors. The factors can range from direct losses in production to the more indirect costs of longer-term control and management of infections and the wider, downstream socioeconomic impacts on livelihoods and satellite industries associated with the primary producer.

Certain parasite infections may be predictable, as they occur regularly, while others are unpredictable because they arise sporadically. In each case, there can be costs for treating and managing infections once they are established, but for predictable infections, there also are costs associated with prophylactic treatment and management. This article provides an overview of issues and estimates of economic impacts drawn from a larger study.

 


Via John Bostock
more...
John Bostock's curator insight, October 4, 2015 5:28 AM

The article only covers finfish aquaculture, but estimates of US$ 1-9 billion show what a major issue this is for the sector. It would be interesting to work out what percentage of this figure is spent each year on research and development to find solutions (my guess is between 1 and 10%); what the risk/benefit analysis of that investment looks like; and more importantly, who benefits and who has the incentives (and means) to invest...

Rescooped by Aquaculturedirectory from Aqua-tnet
Scoop.it!

AQUA-TNET thematic network: an 18-year chronicle of development and achievement in European aquaculture education - Online First - Springer

AQUA-TNET thematic network: an 18-year chronicle of development and achievement in European aquaculture education - Online First - Springer | Aquaculture Directory | Scoop.it

By Margaret Eleftheriou, Marieke Reuver, John Bostock, Patrick Sorgeloos & Jean Dhont

 

The long-running higher education network AQUA-TNET, a tightly-knit collaboration of university departments, research institutes and other stakeholders from the aquaculture industry, was established in 1996 by AQUATT, a coordinating partner in the SOCRATES-ERASMUS Thematic Network DEMETER led by ICA (Association for European Life Sciences Universities). Later, AQUA-TNET activities continued under an umbrella organisation, the AFANET Thematic Network. Previous work on accreditation in European aquaculture courses carried out by AQUA-TNET’s first coordinator, the UETP (University Enterprise Training Partnership) AQUATT enabled the fledging network of 15 partners to publish details of aquaculture courses in all its 15 member countries and to focus on issues soon to be raised as part of the emergent Bologna Process (1999). AQUA-TNET’s ground-breaking work in educational reforms led to its steady expansion, with the result that in 2005 it was established as a stand-alone ERASMUS Thematic Network. Its achievements from 2005 to 2011 under the coordination of Gent University (Belgium) and from 2011 to 2014 of the University of Stirling (UK), demonstrate the incremental impact of AQUA-TNET’s long-term activities. AQUA-TNET played a leading co-operative role between higher education institutions, further education providers, research institutions and industry, defining and developing a high-quality European dimension within its academic disciplines. Activities included contributions to Bologna priorities such as student and staff mobility (M.Sc. and Ph.D. online portals detailing all members’ courses); development of innovative M.Sc., Ph.D., HE/VET and Lifelong Learning (LLL) programmes; organisation of hands-on workshops on new technologies (e-learning, ICT); identification of flexible pathways for lifelong learners (EQF and ECVET); developing diversified language learning for HE; excellent online forum (www.aquatnet.com) disseminating comprehensive information to all stakeholders, including industry.

 


Via John Bostock
more...
John Bostock's curator insight, December 3, 2014 12:40 PM

Here it is... the concise but definitive history of Aqua-tnet ! 

Rescooped by Aquaculturedirectory from Aqua-tnet
Scoop.it!

Generic skills needs for graduate employment in the aquaculture, fisheries and related sectors in Europe - Online First - Springer

Generic skills needs for graduate employment in the aquaculture, fisheries and related sectors in Europe - Online First - Springer | Aquaculture Directory | Scoop.it

There is an increasing demand for highly skilled workers in all advanced industrialised economies. Although most jobs require occupation-specific skills to carry them out, it is widely recognised that generic skills are ever more needed by job seekers, to increase job opportunities and maintain employability; this applies to all sectors of the economy, from selling cars to undertaking marine research. Several recent European Union strategy documents emphasise the importance of generic skills. However, the apparent mismatch between the skills sets that employers seek and that job seekers offer remains a major challenge. This paper focuses on perceptions of and attitudes to generic skills training for university graduates intending to gain employment in aquaculture, fisheries or other marine sectors and presents the results of a survey administered to academics, industry representatives, students (at different stages of their academic career) and graduates. The various respondents regarded most of the 39 generic skills under investigation as important, with none classified as unimportant. However, students undertaking different types of degree (i.e. B.Sc., M.Sc. and Ph.D.) prioritized different generic skills and the level of importance ascribed to generic skills training increased as students progressed in their university careers. On the other hand, university staff and other employers were fairly consistent in their choice of the most important generic skills. We argue that there remains a need to place generic skills and employability attributes and attitudes at the centre of the higher education curriculum.


Via John Bostock
more...
John Bostock's curator insight, October 7, 2014 6:33 AM

Another great and timely output from the AQUA-TNET project (sorry I'm biased...!)

Rescooped by Aquaculturedirectory from ASEM Aquaculture Health
Scoop.it!

What are the ramifications of having an economically significant aquatic animal disease?

What are the ramifications of having an economically significant aquatic animal disease? | Aquaculture Directory | Scoop.it
What I gathered from this article email alert is the wide ranging impacts a disease could have on the nation.

Via John Bostock
more...
John Bostock's curator insight, September 15, 2013 12:33 PM

It is very important for policymakers to know just how much is being lost through serious disease problems