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Genetic variation for resistance to WSS, AHPND in Pacific white shrimp | The Advocate

Genetic variation for resistance to WSS, AHPND in Pacific white shrimp | The Advocate | Aquaculture Directory | Scoop.it

White spot syndrome (WSS) and acute hepatopancreatic necrosis disease (AHPND) have become the main causes of economic loss in shrimp production worldwide. Prevention of these diseases is very difficult to achieve, and efforts to control them have often seen inconsistent results. Moreover, some intensive production systems seem to favor their rapid spread.

In such scenarios, breeding for disease resistance is a viable option to deal with this issue in commercial shrimp culture. Breeding shrimp for disease resistance is worthwhile when there are no other simple, cost-effective control measures, and there are genetic differences for resistance to the pathogen.


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John Bostock's curator insight, October 4, 2015 5:34 AM

Good to see this research ongoing - clearly challenging though.

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Ecuador To Host Next BAP Auditor Training Course | Best Aquaculture Practices

Ecuador To Host Next BAP Auditor Training Course | Best Aquaculture Practices | Aquaculture Directory | Scoop.it
Ecuador To Host Next BAP Auditor Training Course | Aquaculture Certification, Responsible Fish and Shrimp Farming

 

The Global Aquaculture Alliance’s Best Aquaculture Practices (BAP) division invites new auditor candidates and returning auditors requiring refresher training to attend a BAP auditor training course in Guayaquil, Ecuador, from Sept. 27 to Oct. 3, 2015.

The course is also open to industry observers, including government officials, producers and other industry stakeholders who wish to learn more about the BAP certification standards and auditing process.

The course will cover all of the BAP standards, including the seafood processing plant standards (new Issue 4); finfish and crustacean farm standards (includes land-based aquaculture systems: ponds, fresh/brackish water cage farms and marine cage farms); salmon farm standards (new Revision 2); mussel farm standards; finfish, crustacean and mollusk hatchery and nursery standards; and feed mill standards. The course will be held at The Grand Hotel Guayaquil.


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John Bostock's curator insight, June 12, 2015 7:12 AM

The registration deadline is Sept. 11 2015.

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EMS Update: Impacts Continue, But Industry Gaining Against Disease

EMS Update: Impacts Continue, But Industry Gaining Against Disease | Aquaculture Directory | Scoop.it

Global Aquaculture Alliance President George Chamberlain recently reported that as early mortality syndrome (EMS) continues to take a toll on the global shrimp-farming sector, advancing knowledge is progressively leading toward improved practices and better control of the disease.

 

In his May 20 presentation to members of the National Fisheries Institute Shrimp Council, Chamberlain updated the EMS status of primary production areas and passed on recommendations for management methods to reduce the impacts of EMS.


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John Bostock's curator insight, May 23, 2014 11:58 AM

Latest update on activities to address this significant shrimp disease problem.

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GAA: Free Webinar On Early Mortality Syndrome In Shrimp: Managing 'The Perfect Killer'

GAA: Free Webinar On Early Mortality Syndrome In Shrimp: Managing 'The Perfect Killer' | Aquaculture Directory | Scoop.it

10 Dec 2013 - The world’s foremost authorities on early mortality syndrome in shrimp will address efforts to better understand and manage the disease and its impact on shrimp supplies in this free one-hour webinar organized by the Global Aquaculture Alliance and featuring GAA President George Chamberlain and Don Lightner, the University of Arizona pathologist who identified the cause of EMS.A 30-minute presentation will be followed by a 30-minute question-and-answer session (10 am Indochina time).


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John Bostock's curator insight, December 6, 2013 1:59 PM

Book your place on this webinar if you are at all concerned about this disease issue.

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Ben Gurion University Professor Wins Inaugural Aquaculture Innovation Award

Ben Gurion University Professor Wins Inaugural Aquaculture Innovation Award | Aquaculture Directory | Scoop.it

Amir Sagi, Ph.D., a professor at Ben Gurion University of the Negev in Israel, is the winner of the Global Aquaculture Alliance’s (GAA) inaugural Novus Global Aquaculture Innovation Award, sponsored by Novus International. Dr. Sagi was presented with the award at GAA’s GOAL 2013 conference in Paris, France, on Wednesday, Oct. 9.

 

Dr. Sagi’s innovation — which involves a novel biotechnology application to produce all male populations of the giant freshwater prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii through temporal RNA interference — was selected over 15 other creative innovations to capture the award. The 16 applicants dealt with nine species of marine and freshwater fish and shellfish and originated from 11 countries — Australia, Canada, Chile, Denmark, Ecuador, India, Israel, Peru, Korea, Taiwan and the United States.

 

Some innovations dealt with the species themselves, such as production of virus-free grouper or endangered Amazonian paiche. Others dealt with improved design of production systems, including cages, ponds and indoor recirculating systems. Still others dealt with cloud-based data collection systems and disease control.

 

The six judges selected Dr. Sagi’s innovation as the winner because its application addressed a key obstacle in the production of Macrobrachium rosenbergii — manual sorting of juveniles by gender. The judges felt that this innovation could stimulate expansion in freshwater prawn production without genetic modification or use of exogenous hormones.

 

“The GAA Standards Oversight Committee recommended the Novus Global Aquaculture Innovation award as a way of recognizing the integral role of creative advances in driving continuous improvements in aquaculture. BAP standards are routinely revised to reflect these advances,” said Dr. George Chamberlain, GAA president.

Dr. Sagi, who received an expense-paid trip to GOAL 2013, was introduced by Dr. Francisco Gomes, executive manager of the aqua business unit at Novus International, who presented him with a plaque and a U.S. $1,000 cash prize. “Novus is very proud to sponsor this innovation award,” “added Francisco Saraiva Gomes, executive manager of Novus Aqua. “Aquaculture needs innovation in order to capture its potential.”

 

Dr. Sagi is the past president of the International Society of Invertebrate Reproduction and Development and former Dean of the Faculty of Natural Sciences at Ben Gurion University. He holds the Lily and Sidney Oelbaum chair for Applied Biochemistry at the Department of Life Sciences and the National Institute for Biotechnology. He presented his innovation to about 350 attendees at GOAL 2013 on Tuesday.

 

Twenty years of physiological and molecular research on the androgenic gland are behind the biotechnology used to produce all-male crustacean populations. Dr. Sagi’s research culminated with the discovery of the insulin-like androgenic hormone in decapod crustaceans. Now, for the first time, this technology is available to commercial Macrobrachium rosenbergii farmers worldwide.

 

“The beauty of our biotechnology lies in the fact that it represents the first commercialization of temporal RNA interference with no use of chemicals, hormones or generation of genetic modifications,” said Dr. Sagi. “To sustain its rapid growth, the aquaculture industry will need to consistently introduce the latest scientific developments and innovative technologies. I am confident that the R&D community will propose many more such applications in the near future.”

 

The Global Aquaculture Innovation Award was launched at GOAL 2012 in Bangkok, Thailand, last November, to recognize innovative practices that overcome production challenges or mitigate negative environmental or social impacts at aquaculture farms. All types of innovations qualified for the award, including wetlands conservation, feed management, water-quality management, effluent reduction, energy reduction, staff training, community relations, animal welfare, and health and nutrition.

The judges included Chamberlain; Gomes; Best Aquaculture Practices (BAP) Standards Coordinator Dan Lee; Craig Browdy, executive manager of aquaculture research at Novus International; Michael Tlusty, director of research at the New England Aquarium; and Dawn Purchase, senior aquaculture officer at the Marine Conservation Society. Chamberlain, Tlusty, and Purchase are members of the BAP Standards Oversight Committee.


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John Bostock's curator insight, October 9, 2013 5:54 PM

Congratulations to Dr Sagi

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Economic impacts of aquatic parasites on global finfish production | The Advocate

Economic impacts of aquatic parasites on global finfish production | The Advocate | Aquaculture Directory | Scoop.it

Obligate and opportunistic parasites play a critical role in determining the productivity, sustainability and economic viability of global finfish aquaculture enterprises. Without stringent and appropriate control measures, the impacts of these pathogens can often be significant.

Estimating the true impacts of each parasite event, however, is complicated, as costs can be affected by a diverse assortment of environmental and management factors. The factors can range from direct losses in production to the more indirect costs of longer-term control and management of infections and the wider, downstream socioeconomic impacts on livelihoods and satellite industries associated with the primary producer.

Certain parasite infections may be predictable, as they occur regularly, while others are unpredictable because they arise sporadically. In each case, there can be costs for treating and managing infections once they are established, but for predictable infections, there also are costs associated with prophylactic treatment and management. This article provides an overview of issues and estimates of economic impacts drawn from a larger study.

 


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John Bostock's curator insight, October 4, 2015 5:28 AM

The article only covers finfish aquaculture, but estimates of US$ 1-9 billion show what a major issue this is for the sector. It would be interesting to work out what percentage of this figure is spent each year on research and development to find solutions (my guess is between 1 and 10%); what the risk/benefit analysis of that investment looks like; and more importantly, who benefits and who has the incentives (and means) to invest...

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EMS Survey Now Available Online

EMS Survey Now Available Online | Aquaculture Directory | Scoop.it

The Global Aquaculture Alliance (GAA) is calling on shrimp farms in Asia and Latin America to fill out a survey designed to collect information on early mortality syndrome (EMS). The survey is now available online, the organization announced on June 19.

 

This comprehensive survey is the crux of a GAA case study launched in March to identify the practices that prevent and/or manage EMS at shrimp farms. The study will act as a foundation for recommendations to the global aquaculture community for better shrimp-farming practices.

 

The study will be conducted in two phases. The first phase consists of the survey. All shrimp farms in countries affected or threatened by EMS -- including China, Vietnam, Malaysia, Thailand, India and Mexico -- are encouraged to participate by completing an online form.

 


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John Bostock's curator insight, June 20, 2014 11:55 AM

For the attention of all shrimp farmers!

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GAA Publishes EMS Report ‘Managing The Perfect Killer’

GAA Publishes EMS Report ‘Managing The Perfect Killer’ | Aquaculture Directory | Scoop.it

This is a 17-page report titled “Early Mortality Syndrome In Shrimp: Managing ‘The Perfect Killer’.” The report is based on a presentation given by GAA President George Chamberlain as part of a GAA-organized webinar conducted in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam, on Dec. 10, 2013. The webinar, for which 600 seafood and aquaculture professionals registered to attend, provided the latest news and information on the shrimp disease. Also participating in the webinar were in Don Lightner and Huu Loc Tran, both of the University of Arizona.


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John Bostock's curator insight, February 18, 2014 1:42 PM

A good summary of where are are now with EMS

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Case Study: WSSV in Mozambique and Madagascar

Case Study: WSSV in Mozambique and Madagascar | Aquaculture Directory | Scoop.it

Prepared by the Responsible Aquaculture Foundation and funded by the World Bank, this report is Case Study #3 of a series entitled "Lessons Learned in Aquaculture Disease Management."

Shrimp farms in Madagascar and Mozambique remained free from white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) until 2011, when the virus likely spread from wild shrimp populations to the farms. The use of unscreened wild broodstock and high rates of water exchange to maintain water quality in ponds increased their vulnerability to WSSV infection. 
 
Recovery from the WSSV crisis will require the elimination of the use of wild broodstock and the establishment of a breeding center to produce broodstock genetically selected for resistance to WSSV. Farms will also have to install aeration to reduce or eliminate their dependence on water exchange. The regulatory framework needs to be upgraded to provide comprehensive aquatic animal health policies, adequately funded regulatory agencies and national reference laboratories.


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John Bostock's curator insight, November 25, 2013 12:23 PM

This should be essential reading for anyone managing a shrimp farm or working in shrimp health.