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Plan B Updates - 114: Farmed Fish Production Overtakes Beef | EPI

Plan B Updates - 114: Farmed Fish Production Overtakes Beef | EPI | aquaculture | Scoop.it

The world quietly reached a milestone in the evolution of the human diet in 2011. For the first time in modern history, world farmed fish production topped beef production. The gap widened in 2012, with output from fish farming—also called aquaculture—reaching a record 66 million tons, compared with production of beef at 63 million tons. And 2013 may well be the first year that people eat more fish raised on farms than caught in the wild. More than just a crossing of lines, these trends illustrate the latest stage in a historic shift in food production—a shift that at its core is a story of natural limits.


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Good to be in at the exponential phase...

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Aquaculture for Stock Enhancement :: Office of Aquaculture

Aquaculture for Stock Enhancement :: Office of Aquaculture | aquaculture | Scoop.it

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Perendale Publishers (Tuti Tan)'s curator insight, January 2, 2014 5:34 PM

Scientists and researchers use aquaculture techniques as a tool for stock enhancement of important commercial and recreational marine fisheries, threatened or endangered species, and marine habitats.

 
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CSIRO weather model a boost for aquaculture

CSIRO weather model a boost for aquaculture | aquaculture | Scoop.it
Climate modelling for Australia's oceans is set to be rolled out for use by Australia's aquaculture industries.

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DON’T PANIC — The Facts About Population

DON’T PANIC — The Facts About Population | aquaculture | Scoop.it

Don’t Panic – is a one-hour long documentary broadcasted on BBC on the 7th of November 2013.

The visualizations are based on original graphics and stories by Gapminder and the underlaying data-sources are listed here.
Hans’s — “All time favorite graph”, is an animating bubble chart linking health and wealth which you can interact with online here and download offline here.


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Katelyn Sesny's curator insight, October 31, 2014 12:24 PM

Although this is a very long video, it provides extremely important facts about the explosion of population growth, the history and background behind it all, countries and states at risk, already occurring issues and possible solutions to these rising problems. - UNIT 2

MissPatel's curator insight, December 16, 2014 3:21 AM

Most of you have watched this - have a quick recap. Can you use this in any of your answers to exam questions? 

AHS Model UN's curator insight, November 19, 2015 2:13 PM

Population growth in an important topic that is connected to economic development.  If you've seen Hans Roslings TED talks, this is an hour-long version of many of the same concepts and data visualizations.  His Gapminder data visualization tool, it is a must see for geography teachers to show the connections between population statistics and developmental patterns--let students see the data.  This is an article that looks at a different factor, arguing that overpopulation isn't the real issue.  
 

Tags: gapminder, population, demographic transition model, development.

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UNITED STATES: Aquaculture researchers raise Kampachi on zero fishmeal diets

UNITED STATES: Aquaculture researchers raise Kampachi on zero fishmeal diets | aquaculture | Scoop.it

Hawaii-based Kampachi Farms says it can now raise Kona Kampachi — the brand name for Almaco jack, a type of tuna — entirely without fishmeal, as it seeks to farm ‘fish without footprints’.

 

In different trials over the last six months, supported by the Nebraska soybean industry and NOAA, the aquaculture firm has conducted replicated tank trials growing sashimi-grade Kampachi to a 2kg harvestable weight on a diet in which fishmeal has been replaced with – alternately – soy protein concentrate, micro-algae byproducts, single cell proteins and fish peptide concentrates.

 

Taste comparisons have found no discernible difference in product quality between fish grown on the commercial diet (the recipe of which is not known, but contains “an estimated 50% or more” of fishmeal) and those grown on the zero fishmeal feed, Kampachi Farms’ co-founder and CEO Neil Sims told Undercurrent News. 

 

There were also tests of amino acids and fatty acid profiles of the resulting products, the results of which should be readily transferable to other marine fish species, Sims said.

 

Soy protein concentrate (SPC) is not the only ingredient that Kampachi Farms has been successfully experimenting with.

 

Micro-algae byproducts or pigments have been used in combination with SPC in recent trials.

 

The fish peptide concentrate (FPC) is derived from the waste water from fish processing plants, and extracting the FPC from this water can replace some of the nutrients currently provided by fishmeal as well as improving the quality of the effluent water, said Sims. Single-celled proteins are also derived from agricultural waste products which are produced by a bio-digester process.

 

“We’re continuing to tweak the formulations to find the best combination, but we have been able to show that it is possible to completely eliminate fishmeal from the diet of a sashimi-grade fish like kampachi,” he said.

 

This was a good example of Kampachi Farm’s research work in Hawaii supporting the more commercial side of the business, based in La Paz, Mexico, he added.

 

The La Paz site is ready to begin commercial production of kampachi for the North American market, after securing investment from British entrepreneur Toby Baxendale and others, and gaining aquaculture veteran Bjorn Myrseth alongside Baxendale on the company’s board.

 

“This research has benefits to both the commercial and the conservation sides of the business. On the one hand it can mean more scalable, responsible fish farming, lessening our footprint on the seas, and on the other it means more stable and predictable feed prices.”


A study by a Skretting researcher recently supported the need to find replacements for fishmeal in aquaculture feed diets.

 

At the recent GOAL aquaculture conference in Paris there was much talk of alternative fish feed sources, with several breakthroughs seemingly on the verge of becoming mainstream.

 

Soy protein is forecast to meet half of global aquaculture feed needs by 2020, said Michael Cremer, senior international aquaculture program advisor for the US Soybean Export Council (USSEC).

 

In market value, soy protein for aquaculture will represent $4.7 billion by 2020, he said.


The US soybean industry has been “extremely supportive” of aquaculture, investing more than $50 million in the sector to date, said Cremer, something which Sims echoed to Undercurrent.

 

There were also calls at GOAL for fish byproducts to be better utilized.

Around 35% of fishmeal is currently made from trimmings, said Andrew Mallison, director general of the International Fishmeal and Fish Oil Organisation (IFFO), speaking at the conference.

 

This is a share that is continuously growing, said Mallison, adding the industry needs to maximize their use of byproducts.

 

Fishmeal producers, meanwhile, are actively scouring for new raw material sources to meet the growing demand.

 

Neil Ramsden, Undercurrent News

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ECDC-backed R250 million aquaculture project expected to breathe life into Karoo economy | GetNews | For the latest Eastern Cape Business news

Getnews, helps journalists access Eastern Cape business news, events and leaders. It also creates a platform for business in the province to network.

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Innovative Aquaculture Farming Technology in South Africa

http://www.engineeringnews.co.za/article/world-first-commercially-closed-shrimp-farm-in-sa-2008-01-18 Innovative Aquaculture Farming Technology in South Afri...

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Kevin Green's comment, August 19, 2013 2:12 AM
This venture was shut down in 2009. Thought it was to good to be true!
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State: Oyster harvest may be the biggest in 25 years

State: Oyster harvest may be the biggest in 25 years | aquaculture | Scoop.it
Virginia's upward trend in commercial oyster harvests continues as preliminary results show a harvest of more than 320,000 bushels this season — a 28 percent hike over last year.

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NORWAY: Norwegian salmon to South Africa

NORWAY: Norwegian salmon to South Africa | aquaculture | Scoop.it

In a new research project Nofima will investigate the possibilities for increased export of salmon to South Africa.

 

Africa south of the Sahara is one of the regions of the world that is experiencing rapid economic growth. The economic development means that a growing number of consumers have the purchasing power required to choose Norwegian seafood.

 

For this reason, Nofima has been commissioned by the Norwegian Seafood Research Fund (FHF) to examine the possibilities for increased export of Norwegian salmon to South Africa.

 

Objective

 

The objective of the project is to obtain reliable and industry-relevant knowledge about the South African seafood market. The project is to provide the aquaculture industry with knowledge that can contribute to Norwegian salmon continuing to increase its share of the South African market, while at the same time establishing and maintaining a favourable situation for industrial competition.

 

This is to be achieved by analysing international trade statistics, mapping and analysing central value chains for fresh and frozen salmon in South Africa, and identifying important marketing criteria and differentiation opportunities in these value chains.

 

This knowledge will lead to strategic recommendations for Norwegian stake-holders who act in the market or who are considering establishing themselves in South Africa.

 

Norwegian export to South Africa

 

The ambition of the Norwegian salmon industry is to grow. The development of new and established markets is vital to increase the demand for Norwegian salmon and to ensure that the price remains high.

 

Markets with high purchasing power are particularly interesting in this context. South Africa is one such market, in which the demand for Norwegian salmon has increased dramatically in line with the positive economic development in the country.

 

Norwegian companies exported 3,000 tonnes of fresh Norwegian salmon to South Africa in 2012, which was twice the figure for 2011 and six times the figure for 2006. A further 1,000 tonnes of frozen salmon was exported to South Africa in 2012, considerably higher than previous years.

 

The import of fresh salmon from Norway increased rapidly until 2007 (Norwegian Seafood Council, 2008).

 

The Norwegian Seafood Council has shown that most of the fresh salmon was destined for restaurants in 2007 (1,100 tonnes of fresh salmon). South Africa experienced also a pronounced trend for sushi, but there is evidence that this declined after a peak in 2007/2008, following the establishment of several disreputable operators in the market. This will be investigated in the proposed project.

 

The development of GNP per inhabitant in South Africa has been positive during the most recent decade, and amounted to USD 7,500 in 2012. The GNP per inhabitant of South Africa is high when compared with those of other countries in Africa. Thus, the country appears to be an extremely attractive market for Norwegian salmon.

 

The average disposable income increased in South Africa by 60% between 2009 and 2012. This has led to an increase in general consumption. One example is the “black middle class”, in which consumption has more than doubled during the past 10 years.

 

Even so, the purchasing power of the average South African is relatively low, when compared with European consumers. In 2012, for example, each South African used an average of only USD 872 for food, which constitutes 20% of total consumer expenditure (René and Balde, 2013).

 

Each Frenchman, for comparison, used USD 3,037 on food. France is the largest market for Norwegian salmon, where only 13% of the consumer expenditure is used for food (USDA, 2013).

 

Fresh salmon is transported by air to South Africa, due to its long distance from Norway. Air freight is expensive (NOK 13-14 per kilo), and this causes the market price to be high. This means that some segments of the South African market have a considerable ability and willingness to pay for Norwegian salmon.

 

The consumption of seafood in South Africa is, however, low. Experience from other markets has shown that it is a general trend that consumption of seafood increases as income increases. This appears to be the case also in South Africa (Norwegian Seafood Council, 2008): the Gauteng province (Johannesburg/Pretoria) is the area of South Africa that has both the highest purchasing power and the highest consumption of seafood. The Gauteng province and Cape Town are probably the areas of South Africa with the greatest potential for Norwegian salmon.

 

Earlier marketing reports from South Africa suggest that the consumption of seafood [I added “of seafood”] is seasonal, where the consumption is highest during the summer (November and December.) There is thus a potential to develop the market not only in terms of quantity, but also in terms of lengthening the season.

 

Competition

 

Norwegian fresh salmon appears to dominate the South African market, and had 82% of imports by volume in 2007 (Norwegian Seafood Council, 2008). The largest competitors are Great Britain and Chile. These two countries achieved approximately the same prices as Norwegian salmon in 2007. The price for Norwegian frozen salmon was considerably higher than that achieved by the same competitors.

 

How has the situation developed after 2007? A market that is growing should be attractive to exporters in other salmon-producing countries such as Scotland, Denmark (processing), the Faroe Islands and Chile.

There are little knowledge about how the competition from various supplier countries has developed since 2007 in terms of such parameters as volume, price, and types of product.

 

Another central question that the project is to examine concerns the price sensitivity of the market and its relationship to an increase in volume. Such knowledge is important since the air freight contributes to fresh salmon having a relatively high market price.

 

Other purchasing criteria than price will also be analysed during the project.

 

Infrastructure

 

South Africa has a well-developed infrastructure with several large supermarket chains. However, there is currently little known about whether fresh salmon still goes to restaurants after the import has more than tripled. There is also a need for more knowledge about how fresh salmon is presented in restaurants and stores. Which attributes (origin, quality, environmental issues, health, etc.) of the products should be emphasised?

 

Another important question concerns the development of the sushi market – has its growth stopped, or has it developed in such a way that it can absorb more Norwegian salmon?

 

Uses of salmon

 

Consultation with Norwegian exporters has suggested that salmon is popular for barbecuing, and that salmon can probably be used in many of the same areas as tuna.

 

An interesting question in this context is the extent to which salmon products are available and suitable for barbecuing. Another question is whether attempts have been made to convey how suitable salmon is for barbecuing.

 

Norwegian exporters have informed us that frozen whole salmon is primarily used in local smokehouses. The segments that pay the highest prices, however, purchase smoked salmon directly from Europe, since it is reputed to have higher quality.

 

It should be investigated whether there are other distribution channels for frozen salmon in South Africa. There are also very limited knowledge about the degree to which frozen salmon products are presented in the supermarkets, nor do we know the product attributes that are emphasised, or pricing. Market surveys will provide the answers to these questions.

 

The strong growth in the import of fresh Norwegian salmon at high prices, combined with strong economic growth in South Africa, mean that increased knowledge of this market will be highly important for Norwegian actors on the market, including salmon producers, salmon exporters, and the Norwegian Seafood Council.

 

The project will provide increased market knowledge that will be important in understanding the opportunities for both fresh and frozen salmon products, such that it will be possible for Norwegian salmon to grow further on the South African market. This knowledge will also be important in understanding how Norwegian salmon can and should be positioned and differentiated in order to achieve a sustainable competitative position.

 

The project will be led by Nofima. The University of Stavanger and the University of the Western Cape in South Africa are also involved.

A reference group has been established with representatives from Norwegian industry. The Norwegian Seafood Council and the Norwegian Seafood Research Fund (FHF) are observers in the steering group, while the Norwegian Seafood Council is also contributing international trade statistics to the project.

 

References:

 

The Norwegian Seafood Council (2008). Markedet for laks og ørret i Sør-Afrika (“The market for salmon and salmon trout in South Africa”). Report.

 

René, L. & Balde, S. (2013) BUSINESS CHALLENGES AND OPPORTUNITIES IN AFRICA. White paper, Euromonitor International, 2013.

 

USDA, 2013. Percent of consumer expenditures spent on food, alcoholic beverages, and tobacco that were consumed at home, by selected countries, 2012.

 

http://www.ers.usda.gov/data-products/food-expenditures.aspx#26654

 

 

Nofima - Morten Heide, Finn-Arne Egeness, Geir Sogn-Grundvåg and Pirjo Honkanen - 20 January 2014

 

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Scientists Turn Algae Into Crude Oil In Less Than An Hour

Scientists Turn Algae Into Crude Oil In Less Than An Hour | aquaculture | Scoop.it
Researchers believe they have figured out a way to make a promising biofuel that is cheap enough to compete with gasoline

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Turning Points in Modern Aquaculture

This 15-min video was produced by the Aquaculture Service of the FAO Fisheries and Aquaculture Department for the Global Conference on Aquaculture 2010 and t...

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Fish farming waste used to grow vegetables

Fish farming waste used to grow vegetables | aquaculture | Scoop.it

Aquaponics combines fish farming techniques and hydroponics to create a self-sustaining agriculture operation.


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Ammonia in fish ponds | UPM Aquatic Animal Health Unit

Ammonia in fish ponds | UPM Aquatic Animal Health Unit | aquaculture | Scoop.it

Ammonia is toxic to fish if allowed to accumulate in fish production systems. When ammonia accumulates to toxic levels, fish cannot extract energy from feed efficiently. If the ammonia concentration gets high enough, the fish will become lethargic and eventually fall into a coma and die.

In properly managed fish ponds, ammonia seldom accumulates to lethal concentrations. However, ammonia can have so-called “sublethal” effects—such as reduced growth, poor feed conversion, and reduced disease resistance—at concentrations that are lower than lethal concentrations


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John Bostock's curator insight, October 11, 2013 8:27 AM

Nice blog article on the health effects of ammonia build up in fish ponds and how the problem may be managed

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Green Solution - Capecodonline

Green Solution - Capecodonline | aquaculture | Scoop.it
Green Solution
Capecodonline
The center, which built the greenhouse three years ago to conduct research on eelgrass, aquaculture and algae, has teamed up with Clearas, based in Missoula, Mont., to install the wall of tubes.

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Aquaculture

Aquaculture | aquaculture | Scoop.it
When done responsibly, fish farming—also known as aquaculture—presents a solution to meeting the increasing food demand of a growing global population. Farmed seafood already accounts for more than half of all the fish and shellfish we eat.

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Protecting child workers in aquaculture; development of NZ aquaculture; what aquaculture means to my community

Protecting child workers in aquaculture; development of NZ aquaculture; what aquaculture means to my community | aquaculture | Scoop.it

 

Aquaculture in the top of the South Island, New Zealand  has received a boost following the signing of a formal agreement between Cawthron Instituteand Wakatu Incorporation. 


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The Aquaculturists: 14/05/13: Sea cucumbers in Saudi Arabia; new FAO aquaculture website; aquaculture courses in NZ

The Aquaculturists: 14/05/13: Sea cucumbers in Saudi Arabia; new FAO aquaculture website; aquaculture courses in NZ | aquaculture | Scoop.it

After its success of raising shrimp, the National Prawn Company, Saudi Arabia, is diversifying into sea cucumbers (Holothuria Scabra). Raising the species in high saline water and a hot environment, has been a challenges, one that has taken three years of research to crack. However, the company is confident it can harvest 90 tons this year.Sea cucumbers are not well known in Saudi Arabia so the National Prawn Company is targeting markets in China, Taiwan, Hong Kong and Singapore.


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