Apprendre dans un monde connecté
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A Visualization of Global “Brain Drain” in Science Inspired by Abstract Art

A Visualization of Global “Brain Drain” in Science Inspired by Abstract Art | Apprendre dans un monde connecté | Scoop.it

Mapping the global flow of scientific talent by way of Mondrian and Kandinsky.


After their wonderful visual timeline of the future based on famous fiction and visual history of the Nobel Prize, Italian information visualization designer Giorgia Lupi and her team at Accurat are back with another exclusive English version of a piece originally designed for La Lettura, the Sunday literary supplement of an Italian newspaper— this time exploring the phenomenon of global “brain drain” in science, with an eye towards understanding the reasons why researchers might choose to leave their countries of origin and pursue careers elsewhere.


Via Lauren Moss
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Infographic: An Amazing, Invisible Truth About Wikipedia

Infographic: An Amazing, Invisible Truth About Wikipedia | Apprendre dans un monde connecté | Scoop.it

Every Wikipedia entry has an optional feature we take for granted--geotagging. An entry on the Lincoln Memorial will be linked to its specific latitude and longitude in Washington D.C. On any individual post, this may or may not be a useful thing. But what about looking at these locations en masse?

That was a question asked by data viz specialist and programmer Olivier Beauchesne. To find out, he downloaded all of Wikipedia (it’s open-source, after all) then used an algorithm that would assemble 300 topical clusters from popular, related keywords. Then he placed the location of each article in these topical clusters on a map. What he found was astounding...


Via Lauren Moss
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