Appreciative Coaching for Transformation
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How Does Positive Psychology Coaching Work?

How Does Positive Psychology Coaching Work? | Appreciative Coaching for Transformation | Scoop.it
Why and how does positive psychology coaching work so well for coaching clients?

Via Ariana Amorim, Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
Neena's insight:

Positive Psychology & Neuroscience for health, happiness & success ... Njoy and share your views

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Positive Psychology Coaching: 10 Amazing Discoveries About Gratitude

Positive Psychology Coaching: 10 Amazing Discoveries About Gratitude | Appreciative Coaching for Transformation | Scoop.it
Practicing gratitude, or appreciation, is a classic tool in positive psychology coaching. Here are 10 amazing reasons to try it.

Via Ariana Amorim
Neena's insight:

I deeply believe "Appreciation is an attitude of gratitude" ... my life and work are essentially guided by this belief . Though I believe gratitude is embodied deep and plays up naturally , Here is a wonderful article on the art of  'practicing gratitude' ... Njoy

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Five Things Every Leader Should Do

Five Things Every Leader Should Do | Appreciative Coaching for Transformation | Scoop.it
I was recently asked what I saw as major focus areas for leaders.
Neena's insight:

Inspire, lead with questions, build capability and above all cast a tall shadow, not a dark shadow ... wonderful leadership lessons ... Njoy

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Tension: How coaches can optimise it

Tension: How coaches can optimise it | Appreciative Coaching for Transformation | Scoop.it
Tension: Continuing their series on challenging coaching Ian Day and John Blakey take a look at how to turn tension into a positive thing.

 

It can be seen that if coaches hold the belief that tension is negative and should be avoided at all cost, they might be selling their coachees short. On the other hand, if we carefully calibrate tension and responsibly adjust levels of tension to suit the individual and their organisational context, then greater levels of performance are attainable. Can we afford to take the liberty of not exploring this possibility fully when times are tough and everyone is required to 'up their game'?


Via Ariana Amorim
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Gloria Inostroza's comment, October 15, 2012 5:47 PM
¡Por supuesto! Por ello los educadores debemos aprender a identificar o diseñar "conflictos fértiles" para que los estudiantes aprendan.
Tim Thomas's curator insight, May 5, 2014 10:11 PM

Good read

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From Appreciative Inquiry to Complexity Thinking » NOOP.NL

From Appreciative Inquiry to Complexity Thinking » NOOP.NL | Appreciative Coaching for Transformation | Scoop.it
The method of Appreciative Inquiry evangelizes that inquiry is the engine of change, but that traditional problem-solving processes in human systems have a tendency to worsen the problems they are trying to solve.
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A Happier You: A Better Organization

A Happier You: A Better Organization | Appreciative Coaching for Transformation | Scoop.it

"Have you ever wondered what it takes to achieve sustained well-being, happiness, and results? Fortunately, there is a substantial body of research demonstrating just how we can experience more personal fulfillment and how organizations can capitalize on healthier, more engaged employees. It is called Positive Psychology—aka, the Science of Happiness.

University of Pennsylvania’s Dr. Marty Seligman can be credited for coining the term “a positive psychology” during his tenure with the American Psychological Association. It is unlikely he could have known the impact this burgeoning science would have on individuals, organizations, and communities only 15 years later. It is a growing field with acres of open space in which we have come a great distance in a short period of time.

Here are a few examples to illustrate the impact of positive psychology:

 

Successful companies like Google, Zappos, and Genentech have Chief Happiness Officers and rely on outside consultants to implement massive well-being initiatives.

 

* Currently there are two Applied Positive Psychology graduate programs in the United States.

 

* Four organizations (including ours) offer business consultants an opportunity to receive a Positive Psychology Coaching Certification.

 

* In 2009, the Department of Defense hired prominent positive psychologists to drive well-being and results within the Army—at a cost of $34 million dollars. 

 

What is positive psychology, really? In simplest terms, positive psychology is a branch of science concerned with positive human functioning—that is, understanding what works well. Whereas traditional psychology is focused on alleviating the suffering from illnesses like depression and anxiety, positive psychology investigates ways to help healthy organizations, individuals, and communities grow and flourish. 


... Although research in positive psychology has been ongoing for years, more and more people in the mainstream currently are being exposed to this powerful work through books, academia, and the media. Many business leaders also are turning to this established body of research to answer the question, “How can I bring sustainable well-being to my organization?”

The self-improvement industry demonstrates a positive impact on individuals through the sale of millions of books, the facilitation of thousands of seminars, and the making of 14,000 business and life coaches in the United States alone. Positive psychology takes questions about human flourishing and performance much further by introducing research-validated interventions that build sustainable well-being and organizational performance.

As positive performance interventions become imbedded within the personal improvement industry, the combination of scientific rigor and organizational coaching seems a perfect match. We are seeing research-based methodologies gain traction within more conventional organizational development programs, and, as a result, there is a complementary pairing of these two worlds. To borrow from our friend and colleague, renowned positive psychologist and author, Tal Ben-Shahar: These two fields coming together create a bridge between the Ivory Tower and Main Street.'

Neena's insight:

Individual Well being for (or with) Organizational well-being .... Njoy & share back your views

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Beth Holz's curator insight, February 6, 2014 8:48 AM

"...positive psychology is a branch of science concerned with positive human functioning—that is, understanding what works well.' 

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How Does Positive Psychology Coaching Work?

How Does Positive Psychology Coaching Work? | Appreciative Coaching for Transformation | Scoop.it

'sWhy and how does positive psychology coaching work so well for coaching clients? (How Does Positive Psychology Coaching Work?


Via David Hain
Neena's insight:

Coaching is about client

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David Hain's curator insight, February 21, 2014 1:41 AM

Focus on developing what you do well.

Kasia Hein-Peters's curator insight, February 22, 2014 4:34 PM

Coaching is based on psychology, including positive psychology

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Organizational Generativity: The Appreciate Inquiry Summit and a Scholarship of Transformation[PDF]

download link: http://www.rarbes.com/organizational-generativity-the-appreciate-inquiry-summit-and-a-scholarship-of-transformation-advances-in-appreciative-i...

Via Alexander Kidonakis, Sushma Sharma
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Appreciative Inquiry principles: 1. The Constructionist Principle - Coaching Leaders

Appreciative Inquiry principles: 1. The Constructionist Principle - Coaching Leaders | Appreciative Coaching for Transformation | Scoop.it
Appreciative Inquiry principl… http://t.co/ybIV3GWv

Via F. Thunus
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