Application for Seismometers in the study of earthquakes
3 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by enggpt from Amazing Science
Scoop.it!

Enormous Methane Releases from the Arctic Shelf

Enormous Methane Releases from the Arctic Shelf | Application for Seismometers in the study of earthquakes | Scoop.it

A section of the Arctic Ocean seafloor that holds vast stores of frozen methane is showing signs of instability and widespread venting of the powerful greenhouse gas, according to the findings of an international research team led by University of Alaska Fairbanks scientists Natalia Shakhova and Igor Semiletov.

The research results, published in the March 5, 2013 edition of the journal Science, show that the permafrost under the East Siberian Arctic Shelf, long thought to be an impermeable barrier sealing in methane, is perforated and is starting to leak large amounts of methane into the atmosphere. Release of even a fraction of the methane stored in the shelf could trigger abrupt climate warming.

"The amount of methane currently coming out of the East Siberian Arctic Shelf is comparable to the amount coming out of the entire world's oceans," said Shakhova, a researcher at UAF's International Arctic Research Center. "Subsea permafrost is losing its ability to be an impermeable cap."

Methane is a greenhouse gas more than 30 times more potent than carbon dioxide. It is released from previously frozen soils in two ways. When the organic material (which contains carbon) stored in permafrost thaws, it begins to decompose and, under anaerobic conditions, gradually releases methane. Methane can also be stored in the seabed as methane gas or methane hydrates and then released as subsea permafrost thaws. These releases can be larger and more abrupt than those that result from decomposition.

The East Siberian Arctic Shelf is a methane-rich area that encompasses more than 2 million square kilometers of seafloor in the Arctic Ocean. It is more than three times as large as the nearby Siberian wetlands, which have been considered the primary Northern Hemisphere source of atmospheric methane. Shakhova's research results show that the East Siberian Arctic Shelf is already a significant methane source, releasing 7 teragrams of methane yearly, which is as much as is emitted from the rest of the ocean. A teragram is equal to about 1.1 million tons.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by enggpt from Amazing Science
Scoop.it!

20,000+ FREE Online Science and Technology Lectures from Top Universities

20,000+ FREE Online Science and Technology Lectures from Top Universities | Application for Seismometers in the study of earthquakes | Scoop.it

The following topics are covered:

 

Aerospace, Anthropology, Astrobiology, Astronomy, Astrophysics, Biochemistry, Bioengineering, Biology, Biotechnology, Chemistry, Civil Engineering, Cognitive Science, Computers, Cosmology, Dentistry, Electrical Engineering, Engineering, Environment, Future, General Science, Geoscience, Machine Learning, Material Science, Mathematics, Mechanical Engineering, Medicine, Metallurgy, Mining, Nanotechnology, Oceanography, Philosophy, Physics, Physiology, Robotics, and Sociology.

 

Lectures are in Playlists and are alphabetically sorted with thumbnail pictures. No fee, no registration required - learn at your own pace. Certificates can be arranged with presenting universities.

 

NOTE: To subscribe to the RSS feed of Amazing Science, copy http://www.scoop.it/t/amazing-science/rss.xml into the URL field of your browser and click "subscribe".

 

FREE CODE for 2 days at codeschool: http://go.codeschool.com/PzsLdA


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
more...
Siegfried Holle's curator insight, July 4, 2014 8:45 AM

Your knowledge is your strength and power 

Saberes Sin Fronteras OVS's curator insight, November 30, 2014 5:33 PM

Acceso gratuito a documentos de las mejores universidades del mundo

♥ princess leia ♥'s curator insight, December 28, 2014 11:58 AM

WoW  .. Expand  your mind!! It has room to grow!!! 

Scooped by enggpt
Scoop.it!

Photo by kitapow • Instagram

#instacollage Worked 22 hours in the past 48! Now to study! #workflow #work #Yogurtland #busy #student #nursing #study #icandoit #fun #money #books #igfamous #instagood
kitapow's photo on Instagram (#instacollage Worked 22 hours in the past 48!  Now to study!
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by enggpt from Amazing Science
Scoop.it!

3 newly discovered exoplanets could host life

3 newly discovered exoplanets could host life | Application for Seismometers in the study of earthquakes | Scoop.it

Scientists discovered 3 planets in the "habitable zone" of their host stars. Kepler-69c seems less clearly in the habitable zone than the other two planets. They are all more than 1,000 light-years away. The Kepler satellite is looking at more than 150,000 stars for possible planets orbiting them.

Two of the planets -- Kepler-62e and Kepler-62f -- are described in a study released Thursday in the journal Science. They are part of a five-planet system in which the candidates for life are the farthest from the host star.

 

Their host star -- which corresponds to Earth's sun, but is smaller and cooler -- takes the name Kepler-62. The star's planets are designated by letters after the star's name. A third planet that's potentially habitable, but not included in the Science study, is called Kepler-69c.

 

These are the smallest planets ever found in the "habitable zone," the area near a star in which a planet can theoretically hold liquid water. Kepler-69c seems less clearly in the habitable zone than the other two planets, but scientists haven't ruled it out.

 

"With all of these discoveries we're finding, Earth is looking less and less like a special place and more like there's Earth-like things everywhere," said Thomas Barclay, Kepler scientist at the Bay Area Environmental Research Institute in Sonoma, California.

 

You won't be swimming on the planets anytime soon, though. The Kepler-62 star is 1,200 light-years away; Kepler-69 is 2,700 light-years away. A light-year, the distance that light travels in a vacuum in one year, is nearly 6 trillion miles.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by enggpt from JavaScript for Line of Business Applications
Scoop.it!

We've Open-sourced Rendr - Airbnb Engineering

We've Open-sourced Rendr - Airbnb Engineering | Application for Seismometers in the study of earthquakes | Scoop.it

We first introduced Rendr, our library for running Backbone.js apps seamlessly on both the client and the server, in a blog post a few months ago.  We originally built Rendr to power our mobile web app, and in the post we explained our approach and showed some sample code. 

We’ve been blown away by the response from the community.  With 80,000 hits to the original blog post and a constant stream of questions and comments on Twitter, it quickly became clear that we’d found ourselves in the middle of a JavaScript Zeitgeist.  Many developers shared the same pain points with the traditional client-side MVC approach: poor pageload performance, lack of SEO, duplication of application logic, and context switching between languages.

The number one question we received went something like this: “When will u release Rendr???”


Via Jan Hesse
more...
Jan Hesse's curator insight, April 19, 2013 1:30 PM

to underline again: serverside Backbone, so M[precompiled V]C if you will