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What's New on the 31 Topics I Follow?
Action festive, conviviale et revendicatrice d'une nouvelle société
Curated by Betty Denise
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Walled World

Walled World | What's New on the 31 Topics I Follow? | Scoop.it
We chart the routes of, and reasons for, the barriers which are once again dividing populations

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Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, April 14, 6:48 PM

It appears India is constructing a 2,500-mile long fence around its neighboring country Bangladesh. The barbed wire fence may have been built due to that fact India has one of the largest populations in the world and they do not want the struggling people of Bangladesh to enter their country. Also, areas around the fence are becoming dangerous, with more than 1,000 people killed by border patrol and criminals. There are not many jobs in Bangladesh and the people are having trouble finding clean drinkable water. Lastly, the people may be fleeing into India hoping to find work and an improved lifestyle.  

Whitney Souery's curator insight, May 28, 3:51 PM

Walls are a symbol of political boundaries and motives, usually intended to keep certain people in or out. This website in particular clearly highlights this idea in human geography as it explores the various walls that mark our landscape and thus contribute to changing policies and borders. Walls can also affect the landscape, not just mark it, as an effect of asserting either political dominance or border policies, as best seen by the resulting environmental results that come from it and the displacement of people (as seen on Palestinian-Israeli border). 

Lauren Sellers's curator insight, May 28, 10:06 PM

We looked at this map in class its really interesting nd weird to see all the dividing walls in the world and to discover ones youve never seen before.

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The Best Posts for 2012

The Best Posts for 2012 | What's New on the 31 Topics I Follow? | Scoop.it
Global news with a spatial perspective: resources for educators and the inherently inquisitive. http://geographyeducation.org

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, December 28, 2012 10:26 AM

This list is a combination of two types of posts.  Some represent the best posts of Geography Education during 2012 as voted by you the viewers (measured by page views) and I've added a few that I feel where my 'favorite finds' of the year.  For more favorites, you can see the best of 2011.

      

Tags: best of 2012, zbestofzbest, geo-inspiration.

Dwane Burke's curator insight, January 1, 2013 10:23 AM

What can you learn by looking at these sites?

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Remote Sensing and Land Cover Change

Remote Sensing and Land Cover Change | What's New on the 31 Topics I Follow? | Scoop.it

By moving the slider, the user can compare 1990 false-color Landsat views (left) with recent true-color imagery (right). Humans are increasingly transforming Earth’s surface—through direct activities such as farming, mining, and building, and indirectly by altering its climate.


This interactive feature includes 12 places that have experienced significant change since 1990.  This is an user-friendly way to compare remote sensing images over time.  Pictured above is the Aral Sea, which is and under-the-radar environmental catastrophe in Central Asia that has its roots in the Soviet era's (mis)management policies.  

 

Tags: remote sensing, land use, environment, geospatial, environment modify, esri, unit 1 Geoprinciples, zbestofzbest.


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Luke Walker's curator insight, October 23, 2013 8:14 PM

See how much the Aral Sea has changed due to the impact of humans on their environment for yourself. Drag the slider tool to see a before and after. Reference your textbook (p61) for the whole story.

Amy Marques's curator insight, April 24, 9:46 AM

This map is a true testament to the people who believe human activity does not affect the earth. Humans have been transforming Earth’s surface for years, through direct activities such as farming, mining, and building, and indirectly by altering its climate. Much of the transformation taking place in the Aral sea leads to its connection to the Soviet era and their lack of understanding of the environment. This mismanagement of the Aral Sea is leading to a lack of water for the people who live in Central Asia.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 7:30 AM

The colors seen in photographs and images like this is because of the equipment used. Sometimes the quality of the equipment makes the pictures look different than they actually are. This basin has dried up over time and its surface has signs of significant change.

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Welcome to 'Geography Education'

Welcome to 'Geography Education' | What's New on the 31 Topics I Follow? | Scoop.it

Finding Materials: This site is designed for geography students and teachers to find interesting, current supplemental materials.  To search for place-specific posts, browse this interactive map.  To search for thematic posts, see http://geographyeducation.org/thematic/ (organized by the APHG curriculum).  Also you can search for a keyword by clicking on the filter tab above.

 

Staying Connected: You can receive post updates in the way that best fits how you use social media.

Update Notifications: Twitter, Facebook, Pinterest, Google+.

              Email: Click 'follow' button at top right of this page.

Sites with Content: Wordpress, Scoop.it.


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SRINIVAS KASULLA's comment, August 31, 2013 11:19 AM
Awsome liked the map and would like to contribute ....thanks for such a nice article Peters Energy :)
SRINIVAS KASULLA's comment, August 31, 2013 11:19 AM
Awsome liked the map and would like to contribute ....thanks for such a nice article Peters Energy :)
Thomas C. Thompson's curator insight, August 31, 2013 4:51 PM

Love this Geography Education site! Set up two ways: regionally and thematically so you can find lesson ideas easily.

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Crowdsourcing an Israeli-Palestinian Border

Crowdsourcing an Israeli-Palestinian Border | What's New on the 31 Topics I Follow? | Scoop.it

A new interactive tool allows you to decide how many Israeli settlers to annex and what constitutes a viable Palestinian state.

 

This article from the Atlantic is a great introduction to a mapping tool that puts the user at the virtual negotiation table.  Peace talk proposals often center around the amount of land that Palestinians want and the Jewish settlements in the West Bank that the Israelis want as a part of the state of Israel.  This interactive, titled Is Peace Possible?, allows the user to propose potential land swaps, see the demographic breakdown of West Bank settlements and videos to introduce users to on 4 major issues: borders, security, refugees and Jerusalem. 

 

Tags: Israel, borders, Palestine, territoriality, political, mapping. 


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OverlapMaps - compare any two places

OverlapMaps - compare any two places | What's New on the 31 Topics I Follow? | Scoop.it
An OverlapMap is a map of one part of the world that overlaps a different part of the world. OverlapMaps show relative size.

 

The above overlap map is the United Kingdom compared to the state of Pennsylvania.  This is an very simple way to demonstrate the true size of remote places, and 'bring the discussion home.'  This site is as simple and intuitive as it is powerful and easily applicable.  This is a keeper.  


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Michael Grant's comment, September 12, 2012 1:07 PM
This toll will and can provide a reliable mapping source to geographers everywhere. It is useful and fun. A neat way to learn cartography
Josiah Melchor's comment, September 12, 2012 8:31 PM
The OverlapMap is a very useful tool that will allow a user to compare different places and parts of the world. Having a more accurate size of a place is critical when comparing 2 or more places. I think that many users besides me will find this very convenient when other resources are not available.
Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 21, 8:48 PM

The above overlap map is the United Kingdom compared to the state of Pennsylvania.  This is a very simple way to demonstrate the true size of remote places, and 'bring the discussion home.'  This site is as simple and intuitive as it is powerful and easily applicable.  This is a keeper.