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What's New on the 33 Topics I Follow?
Action festive, conviviale et revendicatrice d'une nouvelle société
Curated by Betty Denise
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France bans popular English expressions

France bans popular English expressions | What's New on the 33 Topics I Follow? | Scoop.it
France declares war on the English language. Erin Burnett reports....

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Jess Pitrone's comment, May 5, 2013 5:16 PM
A war on banning American-English phrases? Obviously France didn’t get the memo about the growing global community, either that, or they are choosing to fight it tooth and nail (Whoa. Too many puns). The world today is more united then ever, whether it be economically, politically, or socially; everyone is connected somehow. We share everything; the whole world is sitting around eating sushi, wearing Northface jackets made in Bangladesh, watching their country’s version of The Voice (a show of Dutch origin), and i-chatting someone across the world. Needless to say, the world has become a very small place.
France has become known as a country that is steeped in tradition. The French are very sensitive about every part of their culture, and try very hard to preserve it. But why would they reject words that, yes, have American-English origins, but have distinct meanings across the world? I’d say that it’s just another attempt at the French to combat outside influence, and most notably, deter its society away from all things American. Let’s see how they feel the next time we change our language to include freedom fries! Ha-ha
Sylvain Rotillon's comment, May 5, 2013 5:44 PM
It's not so simple ! You can't say "the French" as if everybody rejects english words. It's a national policy but in fact it's mainly a rearguard action denied everyday in the street.
Ana Cristina Gil's curator insight, October 12, 2013 6:39 PM

I think that language chances as culture changes, as time passed things get more modern. For example the past summer I went back to Dominican Republic, I haven’t been there for almost eight years. Even though I kept in contact with my family over there, I was very shock to find how much the Spanish that I knew in Dominican Republic have change so much. I don’t think is possible to keep a language pure, society is not the same as 100 years ago, I bet that certain words that were correct in the English dictionary don’t even exist anymore.

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The world map of chocolate (made out of chocolate)

The world map of chocolate (made out of chocolate) | What's New on the 33 Topics I Follow? | Scoop.it
You may be focussing on chocolate over the weekend - but where does it come from? A global trade analysed. In chocolate (this is what maps are made for!

 

What is the geography of chocolate like?  There is a dark side (no pun intended) to the production of cocoa in many places such as West Africa. 


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Crissy Borton's curator insight, December 11, 2012 9:53 PM

Very cool map. I have never really paid attention to where my chocolate came from before. 

ethne staniland's curator insight, May 16, 2013 11:33 AM

Interesting for our KS1 chocolate topic.

Brett Sinica's curator insight, November 10, 2013 5:43 PM

We all love chocolate.  We all love diamonds and jewels.  In western worlds, these items are easily come by in grocery stores and elsewhere, but what got them there was a challenge.  People in poorer tropical regions around the world worked to get the raw goods of these delicate items we all enjoy.  The payout difference is immense from cocoa to chocolate.  It is sometimes a very crooked market where if it wasn't for the hard working people who get the raw ingredients, chocolate as we know it wouldn't be the same.

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The Rise of Megacities

The Rise of Megacities | What's New on the 33 Topics I Follow? | Scoop.it
By 2025, the developing world will be home to 29 megacities.

 

Through this interactive mapping feature will rich call-out boxes, the reader can explore the latest UN estimates and forecasts on the growth of megacities (urban areas with over 10 million residents).  These 'cities on steroids' have been growing tremendously since the 1950s and present a unique set of geographic challenges and opportunities for their residents. 

 

Tags: urban, megacities.


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Matt Mallinson's comment, November 19, 2012 10:27 AM
If that's what is predicted for 2025, how populated will our world be by 2050? Scary to think about.
Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 16, 2013 12:28 PM

Through this interactive mapping feature with rich call-out boxes, the reader can explore the latest UN estimates and forecasts on the growth of megacities (urban areas with over 10 million residents).  These 'cities on steroids' have been growing tremendously since the 1950s and present a unique set of geographic challenges and opportunities for their residents. 


Download the data yourself as a CSV file and your can import this into ArcGIS online and symbolize your map with any of the columns in the dataset.  


Tags: urban, megacities.


Peter Steffan's curator insight, October 9, 2013 5:00 PM

Very cool!

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International Fast Food Consumption

International Fast Food Consumption | What's New on the 33 Topics I Follow? | Scoop.it

This cartogram shows the distribution of one major fast food outlet brand (McDonalds's). By 2004 there were 30,496 of these McDonald's worldwide with 45% located in the United States.  The next highest number of these outlets are in Japan, Canada and Germany.

 

The world average number of outlets of this one brand alone is 5 per million people. In the United States there are 47 per million people; in Argentina and Chile the rate is a tenth of the American rate; the rate in Indonesia, China and Georgia is a hundredth of the American rate. In all the territories of Africa there were only 150 outlets: mostly in South Africa.  What does this say about consumption, economics, development, globalization and branding? Search http://worldmapper.org for more excellent cartograms. 


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