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What's New on the 33 Topics I Follow?
Action festive, conviviale et revendicatrice d'une nouvelle société
Curated by Betty Denise
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Atlas of True Names

Atlas of True Names | What's New on the 33 Topics I Follow? | Scoop.it

The Atlas of True Names reveals the etymological roots, or original meanings,
of the familiar terms on today's maps of the World, Europe, the British Isles and the United States.

For instance, where you would normally expect to see the Sahara indicated,
the Atlas gives you "The Tawny One", derived from Arab. es-sahra “the fawn coloured, desert”.


Via Seth Dixon
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John Blunnie's curator insight, July 2, 2013 8:12 AM

True names give these maps a unique and historic twist.

Carol Thomson's curator insight, July 17, 2013 1:57 AM

I loved looking at the map of great britain.  I hope it grabs my pupils' attention as an introduction to maps.

Amy Marques's curator insight, July 31, 2013 4:19 PM

Great to see what the original names where! Especially for those that are similar to its current name and those that are completely irrelevant!

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Persuasive Maps

Persuasive Maps | What's New on the 33 Topics I Follow? | Scoop.it
John F. Smith's smartly-designed biblical anti-slavery map of the mid-19th Century United States. Prepared in 1888; excerpted from “Maps for an emerging nation”.

 

Maps don't just convey information--they can also shape the way that we think about the world that is being represented by that map.  Maps are texts and sometimes they have very strong perspectives that the cartographer put into that map.  This persausive map shows one way of interpreting American history after the end of reconstruction.  Notice that in addition to the very overt religious, moral tone condemning the South for slavery, the ideas of Manifest Destiny are also woven into the fabric of this map. 

 

Tags: cartography, historical, USA.


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Twitter Languages in London

Twitter Languages in London | What's New on the 33 Topics I Follow? | Scoop.it

This map is a fantastic geovisualization that maps the spatial patterns of languages used on the social media platform Twitter.  This map was in part inspired by a Twitter map of Europe.  While most cities would be expected to be lingistically homogenous, but London's cosmopolitan nature and large pockets of immigrants.

   

Tags: social media, language, neighborhood, visualization, cartography.


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Betty Denise's comment, November 7, 2012 10:13 AM
Thank you – again – for your tremendous partnership
Ursula O'Reilly Traynor's comment, December 14, 2012 6:29 PM
thanks for this! we have shared!
Ursula O'Reilly Traynor's comment, December 14, 2012 6:29 PM
thanks for this! we have shared!
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Crowdsourcing an Israeli-Palestinian Border

Crowdsourcing an Israeli-Palestinian Border | What's New on the 33 Topics I Follow? | Scoop.it

A new interactive tool allows you to decide how many Israeli settlers to annex and what constitutes a viable Palestinian state.

 

This article from the Atlantic is a great introduction to a mapping tool that puts the user at the virtual negotiation table.  Peace talk proposals often center around the amount of land that Palestinians want and the Jewish settlements in the West Bank that the Israelis want as a part of the state of Israel.  This interactive, titled Is Peace Possible?, allows the user to propose potential land swaps, see the demographic breakdown of West Bank settlements and videos to introduce users to on 4 major issues: borders, security, refugees and Jerusalem. 

 

Tags: Israel, borders, Palestine, territoriality, political, mapping. 


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'Geography Education' posts Geo-coded

'Geography Education' posts Geo-coded | What's New on the 33 Topics I Follow? | Scoop.it

I'm pleased to announce that for GIS Day, I created a map that has hyperlinks to regionally specific posts that I put on 'Geography Education.'  This map was created using ArcGIS Online (here's a free tutorial on how to to use ArcGIS Online tailored for K-12 educators).  This is just another way to search for materials on this site.  Feel free to embed this map on your webpage or share the link.  I'll add more tags in the future as well (just click on the icon to get a pop-up, then click on the image to see the posts).  Happy GIS Day!


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Jamie Strickland's comment, November 16, 2012 6:15 AM
How cool is this!! This will make it even easier to teach my World Regional and Global Connections courses! Thanks, Seth.
Matt Mallinson's comment, November 19, 2012 8:40 AM
Overall I think this is a good map. There are a few countries that I think could have better abbreviations, North Korea for example is labeled "N" and South Korea is labeled "SK". I went and looked for an "NK" label and there wasn't one. The map is flawed in that way because of the shortage of tools the program gives you to use. The shortage of tools also leads to many places with the same globe image or same lettering as other places. I think you did a good job with what you had available to use.
Charles Matley's comment, November 19, 2012 8:46 AM
This map is great. I The use of the national geographic map makes it more manageable and appealing to the eye. The categorization of posts into geographic locations is very clever. It could potentially be viewed as more "fun" because it is interactive.
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Map as Art

Map as Art | What's New on the 33 Topics I Follow? | Scoop.it
There are many amazing examples of artists who turn to cartography and geography for inspiration. Whether through the lens of a camera, paint, ...

 

This series of cartographically-inspired art works changes how we look at maps.  Some of these artists also make us think of places that are on the Earth as explicitly "mappable" features.  I think the Google Maps push-pin in the city center is my favorite.  Which do you prefer? 

 

Tags: art, mapping, place, cartography. 


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GeoMapGames's curator insight, March 3, 9:47 PM

Amazing map art! I like Google Maps push-pin in the city center :)
Which do you prefer?  #geomapgames