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What's New on the 33 Topics I Follow?
Action festive, conviviale et revendicatrice d'une nouvelle société
Curated by Betty Denise
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China to ease one-child policy, abolish labor camps, report says

China to ease one-child policy, abolish labor camps, report says | What's New on the 33 Topics I Follow? | Scoop.it
China announces it will relax its one-child policy and abolish labor camps, the state-run Xinhua news agency reports.

Via Seth Dixon
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Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 11, 2013 11:26 AM

Throughout many years China has always had strict laws on how many children families should have. They recently started to ease their laws to allow people to have more than one child. I could see why they had their laws be only one child because they have such a big population. I also disagree with it because families should be able to have as many children as they want. 

Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 3, 5:09 PM

The one-child policy has caused more problems than it has solved. China now has a larger male population than its female population and competition for brides is rampant. The labor camps were not actually training people in the way they wanted to, it was just an excuse to lock up people for petty crime and get free labor out of them. Hopefully, China will continue analyzing their social policies and making changes to better the country

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 9:32 PM

The one-child labor law is one that should be extinct now. China needs to up their standards of living and allow people their freedom of choice. Who cares if the living situations are crammed to begin with? People need to have their right to choose how many children they do or don't have.

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In China, the Web and Politics Don't Mix

In China, the Web and Politics Don't Mix | What's New on the 33 Topics I Follow? | Scoop.it
It’s the biggest political scandal to hit China in years, and it destroys any possibility of a smooth transition to the next generation of top leaders.

 

Seth Dixon-On April, 10th, Bo Xilai was suspended from the Central Committee and the Politburo amid allegations of his wife being suspected of murder.  This juicy gossip leads to political and social media pitfalls for the Chinese government.  One of the great paradoxes in China is the juxtaposition of it's rush towards economic prosperity through technological modernity combined with the authoritarian impulse to control the media.  For three day, the government shut down SINA, the Chinese equivalent of Twitter because the gossip was too prevalent to monitor all of the discussions.  Chinese bloggers are finding ways around the overworked censors through coded messages, that won't trip the alarm bells. 


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China's One-Child Policy

China's One-Child Policy | What's New on the 33 Topics I Follow? | Scoop.it

"In 1979, the National Population and Family Planning Commission in China enacted an ambitious program that called for strict population control. Families in various urban districts are urged to have only one child—preferably a son—in order to solve the problems related to overpopulation. What has happened since then and what are its implications for the future of China?"  This is an excellent infographic for understanding population dynamics in the world's most populous country. 


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Matt Mallinson's comment, November 19, 2012 11:11 AM
I agree with Don, couldn't have said it better.
Yuanyuan Kelly's curator insight, March 4, 2013 9:27 AM

A really cool infograph regarding China's one child policy!

Brett Sinica's curator insight, November 29, 2013 2:26 PM

This was a cool graphic to explain the basics of the birth policies in China.  As a country, it is respectable for them to try and control their global footprint and growth within the country, yet some of the measures that are taken to achieve or sustain them are slightly questionable.  One of the graphics displayed having one child compared to more than one, which were have the chance of being followed by fines, confiscations of belongings, and even job loss.  In a sense, by having more (a child) they actually get less (money, goods, respect).  The goal of reducing the birth rates had actually worked since it was put in place, though it didn't come without some sort of an expense of the citizens.