appalachian social enterprise
42 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by SaraDay Evans from Economic Networks - Networked Economy
Scoop.it!

Shagbark Seed & Mill is changing the way restaurants use grains - Columbus Crave

Shagbark Seed & Mill is changing the way restaurants use grains - Columbus Crave | appalachian social enterprise | Scoop.it
Shagbark Seed & Mill sparked a change with one simple question: Can grains and beans be local? The answer, they are proving, is yes.

Via june holley
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by SaraDay Evans
Scoop.it!

Appalachia's Bright Future Longtime Coming - The Courier-Journal (blog)

Appalachia's Bright Future Longtime Coming - The Courier-Journal (blog) | appalachian social enterprise | Scoop.it
Appalachia's Bright Future Longtime Coming The Courier-Journal (blog) Throughout the weekend and while driving home, I could not help but be reminded of two documents published and distributed years ago by the Catholic Committee on Appalachia: -...
SaraDay Evans's insight:

This culture of death
sees Appalachia
just as a deposit of “resources,”
to be measured only in terms of money:

its mountain forests
like lifeless piles of “raw material”
to be stripped and shipped off elsewhere
to feed the consumer society,its empty coal mines
like forgotten and meaningless pits
to be filled with endless garbage
from the consumer society, its unemployed people
available as cheap labor
to guard the countless imprisoned people,
themselves cast off
by the consumer society.

By contrast,
the sustainable and hopeful path
sees Appalachia as a community of life,
in which people and land are woven together
as part of Earth’s vibrant creativity,
in turn revealing God’s own creativity.

In the vision of this path,

the mountain forests are sacred cathedrals,
the holy dwelling of abundant life-forms
which all need each other,
including us humans,
with all revealing God’s awesome majesty
and tender embrace; empty mines are sacred wombs of Earth,
opening pathways to underground rivers
and to life-giving aquifers,
in turn running beneath many states,
and needing to be kept pure and clean
as God’s holy waters;and the people are God’s co-creators,
called to form sustainable communities,
and to develop sustainable livelihoods,
all in sacred creative communion
with land and forest and water and air,
indeed with all Earth’s holy creatures.

It is this alternative path, we believe,
which John Paul II described
as the true path of the future,
and rightly called “a culture of life.”

- See more at: http://blogs.courier-journal.com/betterlife/pdelahanty/2013/04/29/appalachias-bright-future-longtime-coming/#sthash.l3k1RHYR.dpuf

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by SaraDay Evans
Scoop.it!

Friday Consulting and SOCAP Awarding the Unsung Heroes of Social Enterprise - PR Web (press release)

Friday Consulting and SOCAP Awarding the Unsung Heroes of Social Enterprise - PR Web (press release) | appalachian social enterprise | Scoop.it
Friday Consulting and SOCAP Awarding the Unsung Heroes of Social Enterprise PR Web (press release) Friday Consulting and Social Capital Markets (SOCAP) have partnered to launch a new social entrepreneurship award: The Impact Weavers Award.They are...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by SaraDay Evans
Scoop.it!

Appropriate Tech Comes to Appalachia - Popular Mechanics

Appropriate Tech Comes to Appalachia - Popular Mechanics | appalachian social enterprise | Scoop.it
Popular Mechanics
Appropriate Tech Comes to Appalachia
Popular Mechanics
For the past four years, though, Brandis and colleagues have been rethinking small farm technology in Appalachia based on work they've done in Africa.
SaraDay Evans's insight:

ok, been thinking about this for awhile, the Appalachia and Africa connection. "Brandis and colleagues have been rethinking small farm technology in Appalachia based on work they've done in Africa. They work mostly with farmers in Rutherford County, North Carolina, a largely rural area about an hour outside of Asheville. "Someone from Rutherford County contacted me and said, 'I saw Full Belly stuff in Africa,' " Brandis says. "When he learned it came from North Carolina, he got pissed. He thought, well, if Africa has access to it, how come people in North Carolina don't?" 

Read more: Appropriate Tech Comes to Appalachia - Popular Mechanics 
Follow us: @PopMech on Twitter | popularmechanics on Facebook 
Visit us at PopularMechanics.com

more...
No comment yet.