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Bitcoin Survival Guide: Everything You Need to Know About the Future of Money | Wired Enterprise | Wired.com

Bitcoin Survival Guide: Everything You Need to Know About the Future of Money | Wired Enterprise | Wired.com | ApocalypseSurvival | Scoop.it

The price of a bitcoin topped $900 last week, an enormous surge in value that arrived amidst Congressional hearings where top U.S. financial regulators took a surprisingly rosy view of digital currency. Just 10 months ago, a bitcoin sold for a measly $13.

 

The spike was big news across the globe, from Washington to Tokyo to China, and it left many asking themselves: “What the hell is a bitcoin?” It’s a good question — not only for those with little understanding of the modern financial system and how it intersects with modern technology, but also for those steeped in the new internet-driven economy that has so quickly remade our world over the last 20 years.

 

Bitcoin is a digital currency, meaning it’s money controlled and stored entirely by computers spread across the internet, and this money is finding its way to more and more people and businesses around the world. But it’s much more than that, and many people — including the sharpest of internet pioneers as well as seasoned economists — are still struggling to come to terms with its many identities.

 

With that in mind, we give you this: an idiot’s guide to bitcoin. And there’s no shame in reading. Nowadays, as bitcoin is just beginning to show what it’s capable of, we’re all neophytes.

 

Bitcoin isn’t just a currency, like dollars or euros or yen. It’s a way of making payments, like PayPal or the Visa credit card network. It lets you hold money, but it also lets you spend it and trade it and move it from place to place, almost as cheaply and easily as you’d send an email.

 

As the press so often points out, Bitcoin lets you do all this without revealing your identity, a phenomenon that drove its use on The Silk Road, an online marketplace for illegal drugs. But at the same time, it’s a system that operates completely in the public view. All Bitcoin transactions are recorded online for anyone to see, lending a certain transparency to the system, a transparency that can drive a new trust in the economy and subvert the anonymity sought by those on The Silk Road, which the feds shut down last month.

 

Bitcoin is much more than a money service for illegal operations. It’s a re-imagining of international finance, something that breaks down barriers between countries and frees currency from the control of federal governments. Bitcoin is controlled by open source software that operates according to the laws of mathematics — and by the people who collectively oversee this software. The software runs on thousands of machines across the globe, but it can be changed. It’s just that a majority of those overseeing the software must agree to the change.

 

In short, Bitcoin is kind of like the internet, but for money.

 

Click headline to read more--


Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
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Why our Christmas appeal is supporting Trussell Trust food banks to give children a Christmas

Why our Christmas appeal is supporting Trussell Trust food banks to give children a Christmas | ApocalypseSurvival | Scoop.it
Astonishingly in this wealthy country in the 21st century, there are 20,000 youngsters who will have almost nothing to eat on Christmas Day

Via Steven Preece
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13 Ailments Caused by Lack of Water

13 Ailments Caused by Lack of Water | ApocalypseSurvival | Scoop.it
Most people don’t think they need to worry about dehydration. To them, dehydration is something that happens to travelers in the desert when they run out of water.

Via Thomas Faltin
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Jolyn Chia's curator insight, January 24, 2014 9:35 PM

From this article,i can see that people are lack of water supply. water is an important thing in our daily life. we cannot live without it. Many people suffer due to lack of water, as water are needed for growing crops ,bathing, cooking and stuff. People who live in the desert often face such problems and some even die from it. We should not waste water as it is important for survival. Without water, we cant do much things. Therefore,we can help save water by lessening our bathing time, remember to turn off the water when not in use. All this simple gestures can help, so do your part and save water. What if one day our water supply got cut off? how are we going to survive ? How are we suppose to keep ourselves clean? 

Merissa Ong's curator insight, January 25, 2014 4:40 AM

In this article, it shows the importance of water. People living in poverty only treat this resource as something to get you across the desert.

One way we could all help them is by not wasting water. Turning off the tap when not in use is an example. 

Although poverty does not happen to me but we still need to spare a thought for the other people who are lacking in their daily needs. We should put ourselves in their shoes.

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How to Open a Can without Can Opener - Zombie Survival Tips #20

Subscribe to My friend KGBsurivalist: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F5I6-OlfhAU Don't have any tools to open a can no problem just use concrete My 2nd chann...

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Time to Survive, Time to Build a Cob Oven

Time to Survive, Time to Build a Cob Oven | ApocalypseSurvival | Scoop.it

 

Cob Ovens are a relatively inexpensive way to bake, with all the benefits of wood-fire such as a hot hearth.

 

Materials are raw and often sourced locally from the land.

 

This Cob Oven was built leading up to the 2008 Forest Festival held in Jackeys Marsh, Tasmania.

 

The oven is a design from Build your own Earth Oven by Kuko Denzer. Many thanks to Jenny for the photos...

 


Via Mhd.Shadi Khudr
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Mhd.Shadi Khudr's comment, November 24, 2013 6:35 PM
Glad you like it Laura
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Survival of mankind in the face of disaster

Survival of mankind in the face of disaster | ApocalypseSurvival | Scoop.it
Tacloban, Philippines
By Bobby Yip
Back in 2006, I landed at Tacloban airport, then took a car for a six-hour journey to cover a mudslide which killed 900 people in a remote village in the central Philippines.

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Storm stories: Another miracle baby, reaching Guiuan, 'survival of the fittest'

Storm stories: Another miracle baby, reaching Guiuan, 'survival of the fittest' | ApocalypseSurvival | Scoop.it
On the fifth day after the storm, desperation gave way to anarchy in parts of the Philippines. Police exchanged fire with apparent looters, and eight people were crushed to death when a hungry mob stormed a warehouse full of rice.

Via Thomas Faltin
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The Role of Social Media during a Natural Disaster

The Role of Social Media during a Natural Disaster | ApocalypseSurvival | Scoop.it
MarketingCharts, in January 2013 had reported that on an average an American user spends about 3+ hours every day on social networking sites.

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Typhoon Haiyan Before & After

Typhoon Haiyan Before & After | ApocalypseSurvival | Scoop.it
View interactive before and after images showing the devastation Typhoon Haiyan has caused in Tacloban City, Philippines.

Via Seth Dixon
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Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, April 19, 2014 10:50 PM

By viewing the before and after images, one can see how destructive this typhoon was. Almost every building was absolutely destroyed and the damage looks overwhelming. Disaster's such as this can really set a country back, as the damage appears to be costly. Although sad to look at, these images were informational. 

Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 3, 2014 7:01 PM

A great set of photos to show the great destructive force of a storm on coastlines. The Philippines are a bunch of small islands made up of primarily coastlines so this typhoon destroyed huge amounts of the country.

Nicole Kearsch's curator insight, December 8, 2014 1:16 PM

We know that natural disasters cause a lot of damage and personal loss but we don't really ever know how much damage is caused until we see it.  Even when we do see it if we don't know what it looked like before it really doesn't mean anything to us.  Using these before and after maps you can really understand how much destruction happened when the typhoon hit the Philippines.  You can see the loss of property, infrastructure and natural resources that were once there.  The loss of not only peoples homes, but entire neighborhoods wiped right off the map.  The remnants of roads can be seen but that is all they are, remnants.  The ability to see the before as well as the after really strikes a toll and makes people realize that this is serious and not just another storm for the people that live here.

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The Philippines' Geography Makes Aid Response Difficult

The Philippines' Geography Makes Aid Response Difficult | ApocalypseSurvival | Scoop.it

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Kenny Dominguez's curator insight, November 30, 2013 10:59 PM

This is a devastating time for the people of the Philippines. All they have to worry about is staying alive and being close to there family members. Help is on the way. Everyone in the world should pitch in and try to help them in anyway they can. But what I would like to find out is why this has happen when it has not before in this country. This country I have not seen in the news before this big devastation had happened. I am also curious to find out how come the help aid is taking so long to arrive when people are dying because they have no food available for them because it has been destroyed or it is trapped under all the debris from all the buildings that have collapsed because they were not structured properly. this situation is a repeat of hurricane Katrina in the united states were all the house were not hurricane proof and were built in places known for disaster.

Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, April 19, 2014 10:37 PM

Due to the fact the Philippines is made up of over 7,000 islands, it makes aid response very difficult. When natural disasters such as typhoons occur in the Philippines it can negatively affect hundreds of islands, making it difficult to help the people on every island. It can takes days for supplies to arrive on some of the islands, and sometimes people do not even receive necessary supplies such as food and water. Countries, which are composed of numerous islands, face many challenges.  

Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 3, 2014 7:09 PM

Fortunately, the Philippines has a relatively stable infrastructure so even though lots of areas were hit, the human fatalities and issues are not as bad as they could have been. Unfortunately, these are many islands and getting from one to the next is very difficult when all communications and landing areas are compromised.

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How Online Mapmakers Are Helping the Red Cross Save Lives in the Philippines

How Online Mapmakers Are Helping the Red Cross Save Lives in the Philippines | ApocalypseSurvival | Scoop.it
Volunteers across the world are building the digital infrastructure for the organization's Typhoon Haiyan relief efforts

Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 12, 2013 2:28 PM

Want to see geographic knowledge and geospatial skills in action?  Crowd-sourced mapping is increasingly an important resource during an emergency.  Poorer places are often not as well mapped out by the commercial cartographic organizations and these are oftentimes the places that are hardest hit by natural disasters.  Relief agencies depend on mapping platforms to handle the logistics of administering aid and assessing the extent of the damage and rely on these crowd-sourced data sets.  Can you join in and help?


Tags: disasters, mappingPhilippines, STEM.

Tony Aguilar's curator insight, November 13, 2013 3:32 PM

online maps are being used to help locate the best way possible to help transport food and resources to those most in need. They van locate bridges and the world is pulling together with tehcnolgy and accurate maps to help the  American red Cross maximize in time and manpower. It seems that after Hurricane Katrina and the Earthquakes in Haiti and Japan, We have been improving our strategies for how to best help people around the globe come together put our time energy and resources together to best help people whose lives have been devasted and crushed by the forces of mother nature.

 

Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 3, 2014 7:14 PM

Having a map of the current landscape, after the typhoon will speed up relief and rescue efforts by showing areas to land and set up help stations. The digital world is immediate now and this will change how organizations such as the Red Cross provide relief to suffering people.

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America's Oldest Veteran Drinks Whiskey And Smokes Cigars Every Day

America's Oldest Veteran Drinks Whiskey And Smokes Cigars Every Day | ApocalypseSurvival | Scoop.it
With Veterans Day coming up on Monday, America's oldest living military veteran is enjoying the spotlight on his service once more, but even at the age of 107 he doesn't seem to be slowing down.

Via Thomas Faltin
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Lessons in Leadership from the Fukushima Nuclear Disaster

Lessons in Leadership from the Fukushima Nuclear Disaster | ApocalypseSurvival | Scoop.it

Three widely cited investigations of the Fukushima disaster — one by the Japanese government, one by an independent team of experts in Japan and a third by The Carnegie Endowment for International Peace — have now concluded that the nuclear disaster of March 2011 was not, as it first seemed, the inevitable result of events no one could have predicted.

 

“It was a profoundly man-made disaster that could and should have been foreseen and prevented,” said Kiyoshi Kurokawa, chairman of the Fukushima Nuclear Accident Independent Investigation Commission, established by the National Diet of Japan.

 

In an effort to understand what went wrong and what lessons in leadership the tragedy can offer, leaders directly and indirectly involved in the disaster spoke candidly at the Tokyo panel on Fukushima sponsored by Wharton’s Initiative for Global Environmental Leadership (IGEL). Based on their presentations in Tokyo and the analyses of others in Japan and elsewhere, three areas emerge as essential to leadership in a crisis: preparation for emergencies, leadership style and communications.


Via Vicki Kossoff @ The Learning Factor
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Vicki Kossoff @ The Learning Factor's curator insight, November 5, 2013 4:03 PM

What can we learn from the Fukushima disaster in Japan? Part of a special report.

Paul Chance's curator insight, November 11, 2013 9:19 AM

From the terrible incident come three good lessons of leadership.

Mike Klintworth's curator insight, November 11, 2013 2:56 PM

Three lessons we can all learn from.  Additionally, this incident demonstrates how a lack of leadership can have disasterous consequences.

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Recycle Plastic Bags Into a Strong, Waterproof Rope Without Any Tools

Recycle Plastic Bags Into a Strong, Waterproof Rope Without Any Tools | ApocalypseSurvival | Scoop.it
Got a lot of leftover shopping bags? Instead of throwing them in the recycle bin, Instructables user foobear put them to use by turning them into a strong, water-resistant rope.

Via Thomas Faltin, ApocalypseSurvival
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Thousands of families reliant on food banks this Christmas

Thousands of families reliant on food banks this Christmas | ApocalypseSurvival | Scoop.it
Tens of thousands of families will be dependent on emergency handouts from food banks in the two weeks over Christmas, says a food redistribution charity.

Via Steven Preece, ApocalypseSurvival
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The State of USA Economy

The State of USA Economy | ApocalypseSurvival | Scoop.it
From Deutsche Asset & Wealth Management.

Via Seth Dixon, ApocalypseSurvival
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Tony Aguilar's curator insight, December 1, 2013 3:59 AM

This is an interesting map that uses color to show us economic differences nationwide. The red stands for bad and the green is fo r better economic regions. Southern parts of Texas appear to be above average and also georgia and the Carolinas. It is interesting that MA was red in terms of below national average. I was also impressed that Minesota was Green on the Above average this map is a quick fact lens into national conditions giving us a glimpse of the current state in our country.

James and Drew's curator insight, December 1, 2013 6:38 PM

This article is on the economy of North America. It includes a map of the economic activity in the United States

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DON’T PANIC — The Facts About Population

DON’T PANIC — The Facts About Population | ApocalypseSurvival | Scoop.it

Don’t Panic – is a one-hour long documentary broadcasted on BBC on the 7th of November 2013.

The visualizations are based on original graphics and stories by Gapminder and the underlaying data-sources are listed here.
Hans’s — “All time favorite graph”, is an animating bubble chart linking health and wealth which you can interact with online here and download offline here.


Via Seth Dixon, ApocalypseSurvival
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Mackenzie Mcneal :)'s curator insight, August 27, 2014 10:04 AM

Maybe the world  being overpopulated is a good thing. In the video it explains how all of our resources wont run out they will just need to be increased. The way we live and what we live off of is much different than what other people have to live off of.  We have all of these resources to spare that as people bring more children into this world we will have plenty to share. The world is a place to  farm,  to be able to provide for your families,  to live your everyday life without having to worry about dying from diseases. So if the world becomes overpopulated it will force people to move to a better inhabitant.

Katelyn Sesny's curator insight, October 31, 2014 12:24 PM

Although this is a very long video, it provides extremely important facts about the explosion of population growth, the history and background behind it all, countries and states at risk, already occurring issues and possible solutions to these rising problems. - UNIT 2

MissPatel's curator insight, December 16, 2014 3:21 AM

Most of you have watched this - have a quick recap. Can you use this in any of your answers to exam questions? 

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How to Read a (Good) Map

How to Read a (Good) Map | ApocalypseSurvival | Scoop.it

"Just as you shouldn’t trust everything you read or see on television, you should never blindly trust information just because it is on a map. All maps posit arguments. Maps present information about how something is. All maps posit arguments. Maps present information about how something is. Just as there are no unbiased arguments, there are no unbiased maps."


Via Seth Dixon, ApocalypseSurvival
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John Slifko's curator insight, November 23, 2013 5:09 PM

Map skills are vital in the study of democratic place and space. 

YEC Geo's curator insight, November 24, 2013 4:44 PM

Good advice.

Ignacio Garrido's curator insight, November 26, 2013 1:09 AM

Exercise 14 :

 

Read the news and answer the questions:

 

a.What is the news talking about ?

b. There are two maps.Maps that is down has these questions ( Answer them ) :

Who made the map?What is the purpose of the map? That is, what is the map attempting to communicate?Who is the intended audience? (It is important to remember that the map may not have been designed for you, but a more specialized audience.)Does the map effectively achieve its communication goals? Does it present an interesting story or argument?

c.Sum up the news ( five sentences in english )

d.Choose another map ( of Internert  if you want ) and answer the questions 1,2,3 i 4. Add the map.

 

Send by moodle.Good luck¡

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Tsunami in Japan 2011

"This video captures some amazing footage of the 2011 tsunami in Japan."


Via Seth Dixon, ApocalypseSurvival
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Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 3, 2014 7:17 PM

Most people do not realize the sheer power of a tsunami. It has the force of the entire ocean depth behind each wave. It also pours onto land for hours until it stops then pours back into the ocean for another hour or so. Most people killed are killed by objects such as cars and buildings crushing them. Seeing videos such as these can help people get a better idea of the forces actually involved and maybe save lives.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 9:33 PM

I hope something like this never happens again. Tsunamis are unreal. They are literally horrifying and to see something like this captured on camera is actually really scary. Damn plate tectonics and people living on the water front.

Lora Tortolani's curator insight, April 20, 1:52 PM

So, I will never forget this morning because my brother was living in Japan at the time and I remember getting a text from him saying "we are ok."  My brother is a bit of a jokester so I figured he had something up his sleeve, however, when I woke up and heard of the destruction, I was so relieved to know he and his family were safe.  For the next month my brother flew rescue missions and brought water and food to the survivors.  He had taken hundred of pictures, and I was able to witness first hand how devastating the tsunami had been.  My heart still goes out to those people, and I am forever grateful that my brother is alive and well.

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'Noah' Trailer Weaves Intense Biblical Story of Survival

'Noah' Trailer Weaves Intense Biblical Story of Survival | ApocalypseSurvival | Scoop.it
The first full-length trailer of Noah shows nearly the whole scope of the biblical tale: Noah's dream that a flood is coming, building an ark, animals flocking inside the finished vessel and the ship thrashing about in a storm threatening to end...

Via Thomas Faltin, ApocalypseSurvival
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Rob Bryant's curator insight, November 15, 2013 9:54 AM

looks good I wanna see it!

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Spatial Navigation Before GPS

Spatial Navigation Before GPS | ApocalypseSurvival | Scoop.it

"Giant 70-foot concrete arrows that point your way across the country, left behind by a forgotten age of US mail delivery.  Long before the days of radio (and those convenient little smartphone applications), the US Postal service began a cross-country air mail service using army war surplus planes from World War I.  The federal government funded enormous concrete arrows to be built every 10 miles or so along established airmail routes they were each built alongside a 50 foot tall tower with a rotating gas-powered light. These airway beacons are said to have been visible from a distance of 10 miles high."


Via Seth Dixon, ApocalypseSurvival
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Giovanni Sonego's curator insight, December 15, 2013 1:49 PM

Adesso sembra incredibile che si usasse un sistema simile per guidare la posta aerea. Forse a quei tempi sembrava normale. 

Steven Flis's curator insight, December 16, 2013 3:14 AM

I love articles like this one where they talk about the collide of different times. This article speaks of huge concrete arrows which were left from 1930's air mail routes. sadly most of the towers that were paired with the arrows have been dismantled but still really cool that these directional arrows from the past can still be found almost 90 years later.

Elle Reagan's curator insight, September 28, 2014 11:44 PM

Wow technology has come a long way in just a short amount of time! We would still be using  those stone arrows if it wasn't for the invention of the GPS. 

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10 Healthy Water Recipes

10 Healthy Water Recipes | ApocalypseSurvival | Scoop.it

"Here are 10 Healthy Water Recipes that your taste buds will love and your body will love even more! I love drinking flavored water but I do not like spending the money at the store to buy them. It is less expensive to make them myself and then I can enjoy the fruit & vegetables at the end of the day too! Be sure to try these waters and make some for your family as well because they will adore them."

 

Recipes Here: http://buff.ly/HKnWSY


Via Carlos Newsome, ApocalypseSurvival
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IRON DOG FITNESS, LLC's curator insight, December 15, 2014 4:43 PM

Turn Plain Water Into Some Healthy

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Reports of the survival of the eurozone may have been greatly exaggerated - Telegraph

Reports of the survival of the eurozone may have been greatly exaggerated - Telegraph | ApocalypseSurvival | Scoop.it
Last week’s surprise interest rate cut by the European Central Bank (ECB) was largely a response to the looming danger of deflation in the eurozone (RT @AnnPettifor: The crisis of the euro is a slow-burning affair.

Via jean lievens, ApocalypseSurvival
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'Absolute Bedlam' In The Philippines After Typhoon Haiyan

'Absolute Bedlam' In The Philippines After Typhoon Haiyan | ApocalypseSurvival | Scoop.it

The news from the Philippines, where it's feared that last week’s powerful Typhoon Haiyan killed more than 10,000 people, isn’t getting better as hundreds of thousands of people struggle to survive and authorities struggle to get help to them.

 

"Its absolute bedlam right now," says Richard Gordon, head of the Philippine Red Cross.  “There's an awful lot of casualties, a lot of people dead all over the place, a lot of destruction.”

 

According to the BBC, a huge international relief effort is underway, but rescue workers have struggled to reach some towns and villages cut off since the storm.

 

Tags: physical, environment, water, disasters, Philippines.


Via Seth Dixon, ApocalypseSurvival
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Rebecca Farrea's curator insight, November 14, 2013 8:50 AM

Even though the death toll resulting from Typhoon Haiyan is around 1,000, it is expected to reach 10,000.  International aid will hopefully help cities such as Tacloban City recover from this storm.

Jack Born's curator insight, November 14, 2013 9:16 PM

This is insane. It has affected millions of people and and even killed people. Its good that so many people are going to help though.

Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 3, 2014 7:05 PM

With so many of the citizens living on the coast, a large typhoon like this completely destroys most of the country. When this much devastation happens all at one time it takes a very long time to recover.

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A Shockingly High Number of Americans Experience Poverty

A Shockingly High Number of Americans Experience Poverty | ApocalypseSurvival | Scoop.it
ReutersAmericans have a habit of talking about poverty as if it were a deep gulch somewhere at the fringe of the U.S. economy. We imagine a few unfortunate souls fall in forever—but only a few.

Via Thomas Faltin, ApocalypseSurvival
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Tess S's curator insight, November 13, 2013 11:34 AM

Poverty is a big problem worldwide and I don't think people realize it's happening in their own neighborhoods.