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If The World Were 100 People

If the population of the world was only 100 people, what would society look like? How many people would have shelter? Clean water? Education?

Via Seth Dixon
ApocalypseSurvival's insight:

Reminicent of the picture book, "If the World were a Village" by David Smith, this video attempts to make large statistics more meaningful to to a broader audience. The concept is simple, but the impact is profound.

 

Tags: statistics, development, perspective.

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Ella Price's curator insight, March 28, 9:19 PM

Reminicent of the picture book, "If the World were a Village" by David Smith, this video attempts to make large statistics more meaningful to to a broader audience. The concept is simple, but the impact is profound.

 

Tags: statistics, development, perspective.

MsPerry's curator insight, March 31, 12:57 PM

Reminicent of the picture book, "If the World were a Village" by David Smith, this video attempts to make large statistics more meaningful to to a broader audience. The concept is simple, but the impact is profound.

 

Tags: statistics, development, perspective.

Denise Klaves Stewardson's curator insight, April 1, 4:06 PM

Reminicent of the picture book, "If the World were a Village" by David Smith, this video attempts to make large statistics more meaningful to to a broader audience. The concept is simple, but the impact is profound.

 

Tags: statistics, development, perspective.

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What the Earth would look like if all the ice melted

We learned last year that many of the effects of climate change are irreversible. Sea levels have been rising at a greater rate year after year, and the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change estimates they could rise by another meter or more by the end of this century.

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Changing The World, One Map At A Time

Maps have always been a source of fascination and intrigue. Today's maps, however, can also help to save lives during disasters, document human rights abuses and monitor elections in countries under repressive rule. This presentation will explain how today's live maps can combine crowds and clouds to drive social change.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 20, 2014 1:03 PM

On this day of giving thanks, I want to remind this community that geospatial skills can be used to help othersWant to see geographic knowledge and geospatial skills in action?  Crowd-sourced mapping is increasingly an important resource during an emergency.  Poorer places are often not as well mapped out by the commercial cartographic organizations and these are oftentimes the places that are hardest hit by natural disasters.  Relief agencies depend on mapping platforms to handle the logistics of administering aid and assessing the extent of the damage and rely on these crowd-sourced data sets made by people like you and me. 


Tagsdisasters, mapping, cartographyTED201, video.

Jon Olaizola's curator insight, November 28, 2014 11:55 AM

You can help!

Rich Schultz's curator insight, November 28, 2014 2:47 PM

Tedx

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The Greatest Invention?

"What was the greatest invention of the industrial revolution? Hans Rosling makes the case for the washing machine. With newly designed graphics from Gapminder, Rosling shows us the magic that pops up when economic growth and electricity turn a boring wash day into an intellectual day of reading."


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Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, May 21, 2015 4:05 PM

unit 6

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, May 21, 2015 4:06 PM

unit 6 key concepts: industrialization, development, technology  

Ryan Tibari's curator insight, May 27, 2015 10:23 AM

Washing machine, the greatest invention of the industrial revolution. Hans Rosling further proves this point, highlighting many aspects of how industrialization not only changed the economy, but the people.

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Congo's Nyamuragira volcano eruption biggest for a century - video

The Nyamuragira volcano, in the Democratic Republic of Congo's Virunga national park, is producing lava fountains reaching up to 400 metres...

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Population pyramids: Powerful predictors of the future

"Population statistics are like crystal balls -- when examined closely, they can help predict a country's future (and give important clues about the past). Kim Preshoff explains how using a visual tool called a population pyramid helps policymakers and social scientists make sense of the statistics, using three different countries' pyramids as examples."


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Nancy Watson's curator insight, September 26, 2014 4:04 PM

Population unit

Lauren Quincy's curator insight, March 20, 2015 1:51 PM

Unit 2: Population and Migration

 

This video was about how demographers categorize data and analyze it. This video showed a few different population pyramids in order to show differences in population in different countries. It showed China as an example and pointed out the remnants of the one child policy 35 years before and how the number of men were higher due to sex selective abortions. They also talked about how the population pyramids could show what stage in the demographic transition model a country was in and how they use them to predict future patterns and changes. 

 

This relates to unit 2 because it covers topics such as population change, demographic transition models, sex composition, population policies and much more. Population pyramids are very useful due to the visualization of sex, age and number composition in a countries population. They are very important in the use of predicting the future change in population because it can tell what the population has gone through in the past and what to expect in the DTM. 

Daniel Lindahl's curator insight, March 21, 2015 10:43 PM

This video illustrates how population pyramids have the ability to show how populations will rise and fall over time. Pyramids specifically show the population based on a specific age, and illustrates a country's amount of young people in comparison to the elderly. 

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Megacities Reflect Growing Urbanization Trend

Read the Transcript: http://to.pbs.org/b6sR86 The capital of the South Asian country Bangladesh, Dhaka, has a population that is booming. However, it stands ...

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Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 8:50 PM

To be a megacity like this, you have to conform to urbanization. There is no possible way to have such a populated and crowed city with farmlands around. This is a place of business yet residential areas, it also is where the marketplaces are and where kids go to school. Megacities need to be a part of an urban society in order for them to stay afloat.

Bec Seeto's curator insight, October 30, 2014 6:07 PM

This is a great introduction to the demographic explosion of the slums within megacities.  This is applicable to many themes within geography.   

Sarah Cannon's curator insight, December 14, 2015 10:20 AM

I can't image or even relate to the experience of living in a place like this. With rivers polluted right outside your house. And those rivers are what people bathe in and wash their clothes. I can't imagine not being able to access clean drinking water or lacking food. The people in Dhaka endure so much their whole lives, a good percentage of them will always live in poverty.

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Food Waste

Producers, sellers, and consumers waste tons of food. John Oliver discusses the shocking amount of food we don’t eat.

Via Seth Dixon, ApocalypseSurvival
ApocalypseSurvival's insight:

Food waste is a tragedy that we all know happens, but the economic system does not work efficiently to maximize the global food production (Disclaimer: it is HBO's John Oliver, so there is some language and references that might not be appropriate for all audiences). 

 

Tags: food, agriculture, consumption, sustainability, video, unit 5 agriculture.

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Jose Soto's curator insight, August 5, 2015 9:21 PM

Food waste is a tragedy that we all know happens, but the economic system does not work efficiently to maximize the global food production (Disclaimer: it is HBO's John Oliver, so there is some language and references that might not be appropriate for all audiences). 

 

Tags: food, agriculture, consumption, sustainability, video, unit 5 agriculture.

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, August 6, 2015 4:20 AM

Food waste is a tragedy that we all know happens, but the economic system does not work efficiently to maximize the global food production (Disclaimer: it is HBO's John Oliver, so there is some language and references that might not be appropriate for all audiences). 


Tags: food, agriculture, consumption, sustainability, video, unit 5 agriculture.

Sue Byrnes's curator insight, August 6, 2015 6:06 PM

Food waste is a tragedy that we all know happens, but the economic system does not work efficiently to maximize the global food production (Disclaimer: it is HBO's John Oliver, so there is some language and references that might not be appropriate for all audiences). 

 

Tags: food, agriculture, consumption, sustainability, video, unit 5 agriculture.

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Motion of Tectonic Plates

"This video is from the BBC documentary film Earth: The Power Of The Planet.  The clip is also embedded in this story map that tells the tale of Earth’s tectonic plates, their secret conspiracies, awe-inspiring exhibitions and subtle impacts on the maps and geospatial information we so often take for granted as unambiguous."


Tags: physical, tectonics, disasters, mapping, geospatial, mapping, video, ESRI.


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Feeding the Whole World

"Louise Fresco argues that a smart approach to large-scale, industrial farming and food production will feed our planet's incoming population of nine billion. Only foods like (the scorned) supermarket white bread, she says, will nourish on a global scale."


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dilaycock's curator insight, October 19, 2014 6:45 PM

Fresco argues that we tend to see "home-made" agriculture as a thing of beauty, whereas the reality is that many small scale farmers struggle and live a subsistence lifestyle. The adoration of small-scale farming, notes Fresco, is a luxury to those who can afford it. Large-scale production has increased the availability and affordability of food. Food production should be given as high a priority as climate change and sustainability, and we should seriously consider ways in which land can be used as a multi-purpose space that includes agriculture.

Stephen Zimmett's curator insight, October 24, 2014 10:55 AM

Louise Fresco speaks of local food production and small scale control

and the entire food nework

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, March 16, 3:43 PM

Many advocates of local foods favor a small-scale approach to farming and are opposed to large-scale agribusiness. It might be easy for those disconnected from the food production system (like me) to romanticize and mythologize the farmers of yesteryear and yearn to return to this past.  This talk highlights how essential large-scale farming is absolutely critical to feeding the global population; this other TED talk discusses many of the hunger problems especially the uneven access to food.  Here are some other pro-agribusiness resources.   

 

Tags: agriculture, food production, food distribution, agribusiness, TED

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What would happen if humans became extinct?


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 6, 2014 4:37 PM

What would Earth be like if all humans suddenly disappeared? This question posed on the YouTube series Earth Unplugged, has many intriguing ecological and biogeographic ramifications that are worth considering to explore how systems are interconnected. 


Tags: biogeography, environmentecology, video.

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, October 27, 2014 10:29 AM

I find this youtube video interesting but for sure, the planet has become very interconnected with humans but that has not been a postiive effect. Humans have done nothing but manipulate the natural order of the ecosystem. If humans went extinct I would assume the earth would balance its self out.

Norka McAlister's curator insight, January 27, 2015 7:50 PM

It is funny because this video just made me think about TV shows such as The Walking Dead and Z-Nation.  Of course, not for the zombies, but what if some disease might wipe out the human race, and also how the earth will looks like after human extinction. The impact on earth when human life is gone will be catastrophic for domestic animals left behind. The wild animals will become dominant. Many species will also become extinct and a lot of chemicals will poison grounds and infrastructure will collapse with the force of the weather after few years. Although, it is fascinating how humans can preamble the fact that satellite can be worked forever after humans are gone from Earth. It is not only about humans, but also about the Earth that we need to come up with more reasons to be green on the planet. 

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Solar Roadways


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Gabriel Pizarro Dasso's curator insight, June 11, 2014 3:15 PM

creo que es al menos el mejor invento de diseño hasta hoy en día 

Nancy Watson's curator insight, June 13, 2014 9:26 AM

What an interesting idea. Power of the future?

Michelle Fulton's curator insight, June 17, 2014 8:20 PM

Some really interesting discussions could be held around this video-Geographically, Scientifically, Technologically, Environmentally, Creatively and Critically. 

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Teaching Kids about Global Poverty

Teaching Kids about Global Poverty | ApocalypseSurvival | Scoop.it

"Living on One Dollar is a full-length documentary made by four college students who traveled to rural Guatemala to live on just a dollar a day. Upon their return, they created Living On One, a nonprofit to raise awareness and inspire action around global issues like hunger and poverty -- and started by publishing the Change Series of video shorts. I found it so compelling I've dedicated this whole film fest to it. Each episode not only succinctly frames an issue faced by people in the developing world and makes it personal, but also offers resource links to learn more -- and even better -- to do something about it."


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Character Minutes's curator insight, March 13, 2014 1:24 PM

Several character traits could be empasized using theses videos. The wheels in my mind are turning!

 

Marianne Naughton's curator insight, March 13, 2014 8:14 PM

Fundraiser event taught by kids

lyn chatfield's curator insight, March 17, 2014 11:49 PM

The links

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The Global Food Waste Scandal

TED Talks Western countries throw out nearly half of their food, not because it’s inedible -- but because it doesn’t look appealing. Tristram Stuart delves into the shocking data of wasted food, calling for a more responsible use of global resources.

 

No one should be surprised that more developed societies are more wasteful societies.  It is not just personal wasting of food at the house and restaurants that are the problem.  Perfectly edible food is thrown out due to size (smaller than standards but perfectly normal), cosmetics (Bananas that are shaped 'funny') and costumer preference (discarded bread crust).  This is an intriguing perpective on our consumptive culture, but it also is helpful in framing issues such as sustainability and human and environmental interactions in a technologically advanced societies that are often removed form the land where the food they eat originates. 

 

Tags: food, agriculture, consumption, sustainability, TED, video, unit 5 agriculture.


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Kenny Dominguez's curator insight, November 29, 2013 6:13 PM

Ted explains it well how we all waste perfectly good food that people would like to eat. Also it was amazing how much food was in the dumpsters that was just a day or week old. That meat could feed hundreds of people that are struggling to eat and all that meet to waste. 

megan b clement's curator insight, December 16, 2013 1:51 AM

Ted talks about just how wasteful our planet is. How we just ignore the issue and act like it will  not affect us in the future. When he shows you video and pictures of massive piles of the ends of a loaf of bread or all the food that Stop and Shop throws out because it does not "look" good for the customer. How every little bit of help counts you can try to make a little bit of an effort to be less wasteful. We have so much unnecessary waste. Like when he uses the example of how many people throw away the ends of a loaf of bread then he shows the waste of the ends of bread in massive piles it makes you sick. Especially with all of the hungry people in the world we need to be more resourceful.

 

 

Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 21, 2014 2:13 PM

No one should be surprised that more developed societies are more wasteful societies.  It is not just personal wasting of food at the house and restaurants that are the problem.  Perfectly edible food is thrown out due to size (smaller than standards but perfectly normal), cosmetics (Bananas that are shaped 'funny') and costumer preference (discarded bread crust).  This is an intriguing perceptive on our consumptive culture, but it also is helpful in framing issues such as sustainability and human and environmental interactions in a technologically advanced societies that are often removed form the land where the food they eat originates. 


Tags: food, agriculture, consumption, sustainability, TED, video, unit 5 agriculture.