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Kiribati and Climate Change

You might not be feeling the effects of climate change, but Kiribati, a small country in the Pacific, is actually drowning because of rising sea levels. Check out how the government there is trying to run a country that might not exist in a few years.

Via Seth Dixon, ApocalypseSurvival
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Norka McAlister's curator insight, April 25, 5:21 PM

Utterly there is no doubt that climate change has affected the country of Kiribati. It is predicted that in a several years, the ocean will flood all the lands of Kiribati. Currently, however, there are a lot of issues in Kiribati such as health, sanitation, clean water, pollution, waste, and resource shortage. In this video we can argue that erosion is causing the land to sink in this region. The problem is how the government will handle this issue. It is expected that there will be a significant spike in migration out of this country. There is a program that is training citizens to learn skills sets that will allow them to be able to migrate to other regions when the time comes. They will be considered refugees and have to face assimilation and acculturation in their new surroundings and will have to abandon their native cultures in order to adapt. There is only so much these refugee receiver countries can handle. For example, in the case of Egypt, which allowed 130,000 refugees from Syria into their country, is now experiencing issues with overpopulation and lack of finances. As a result, government officials were forced to close the border. This will be a common occurrence as Kiribati citizens find new lands in which to establish a home. In the meantime, Kiribati’s government and citizens need to act fast and effectively to find a solution to the climate change. 

Bob Beaven's curator insight, April 26, 5:14 PM

Climate Change is an issue that affects some parts of the world greater than others.  The island nation of Kiribati is greatly impacted by the effects of the warming climate due to the fact that it is barely above sea level.  In fact, as we learned in class, the country is facing a "when not if" situation regarding having to leave their nation.  The government says it is to relocate with dignity rather than be unskilled refugees when they arrive in countries.  The president of the country, even though it is to late to stop the ocean from flooding his country, is still highly invested in preventing more land being lost from the effects of a rising sea level associated with global warming.  However, until nations such as India and China, as well as the United States try whole hardheartedly to prevent it and cut down on their emissions the trend will continue.  I can't imagine how hard it is to run a country that is in essence preparing for its own demise.  In fact, until taking this class, I was unaware of many of the small countries that existed in the Pacific Ocean. 

Kristin Mandsager San Bento's curator insight, May 1, 4:13 PM

This is a scary thought to lose your home and country.  I'm not sure the rest of the world will care unfortunately because this country does not produce something needed globally.  Is it possible to create a Waterworld of sorts (Kevin Kostner movie) or Esgaroth (The Hobbit- Lake town).  I know these are movie fantasy, but maybe they could create something like this.  Or find a backer to drop lots of sand on the island periphery to build it back up like Abu Dhabi's The World.  This would bring tourism I believe.  This would bring money, which would then sustain the Kiribati.  They need to get a highly visible celebrity involved.  

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Topaz Solar Farm, California

Topaz Solar Farm, California | ApocalypseSurvival | Scoop.it
The new 550 megawatt facility in California produces enough electricity to power 180,000 homes.

 

The modules are part of Topaz Solar Farm, one of the largest photovoltaic power plants in the world. At 9.5 square miles (25.6 square kilometers), the facility is about one-third the size of Manhattan island, or the equivalent of 4,600 football fields.

Construction at Topaz began in 2011. The plant was mostly complete by November 2014, when it was turned on and began to generate electricity.

 

Tags: energy, resources, unit 6 industry, California, images, remote sensing.


Via Seth Dixon
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Maricarmen Husson's curator insight, March 24, 4:01 PM

GRANJA SOLAR TOPAZIO EN CALIFORNIA. PROVEE ELECTRICIDAD A 180.000 HOGARES. PLANTA DE ENERGÍA SOLAR

 

María del Sol Guerra martín's curator insight, April 4, 7:23 AM

In this text you will find information about a photovoltaic power  plant. Could you find information about photovoltaic plants in Spain?
Send the report before ....

Aleena Reyes's curator insight, April 8, 7:20 PM

Seeing America taking steps in use solar power makes me incredibly happy. The US, in my opinion, needs to adopt multiple ways of utlizing various types of energy sources. The quote, "BHE estimates, that is enough to displace about 407,000 metric tons of carbon dioxide per year, the equivalent of taking 77,000 cars off the road" is impressive. However, I do feel that the auto industry is the environmental scape goat. The textile industry produces much more waste, especially with all of the advancements the auto industry has gone through.

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Simulation of the Oso Landslide

Simulation of the Oso Landslide | ApocalypseSurvival | Scoop.it

"The large landslide that occurred in March near Oso, Washington was unusually mobile and destructive."


Via Seth Dixon, ApocalypseSurvival
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 13, 1:53 PM

There are several reasons for landslides--some are purely a result of physical geography and others are related to land use patterns.  The landslide in Washington state last year was a combination of the two (see on map) and it is a good teaching moment to discuss the environmental impacts of land use patterns and resource extraction projects.  As seen in this interactive, the river was cutting at the base of the hill, while loggers were clear-cutting at the top of the mountain.  Trees help prevent erosion as the roots hold the soil in place--a critical piece to the puzzle in a very rainy climate.  With $1 million worth of timber on the slope, logging companies persisted despite objections from the Department of Natural Resources and some restrictions (but in hindsight, those restrictions clearly were not enough).  Watch a simulation of the landslide here.  

View the impact in ArcGIS online: Before and After Swipe, LiDAR I and II, and Imagery.


Questions to Consider: Other than economic worth, what other ways are there to value and evaluate the environment?  How could this landscape have been protected and managed better or was this landslide inevitable?   


Tagspolitical ecology, resources, environment, environment modify, industry, physical, geomorphology, erosion, landforms.

Kristin Mandsager San Bento's curator insight, January 27, 4:50 PM

This seems like a useful tool to a degree.  But if we could actually simulate every destructive event then we would be miracle workers.  This was a sad event.  We have left such an imprint on the earth that it's starting to fight back.  We need to be more aware and careful with the one planet we have.  Climate changes are in the news more and more.  We can't ignore climate changes anymore.  

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Mapping the Spread of Drought Across the U.S.

Mapping the Spread of Drought Across the U.S. | ApocalypseSurvival | Scoop.it
Maps and charts updated weekly show the latest extent of the drought in the United States.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 15, 2014 2:58 PM

I've shared numerous links here about the drought situation in California over the past few months, but the situation extends far beyond California as these animated maps and charts demonstrate. Some of the best public data on drought can be found at the National Drought Mitigation Center


Tags: wateragriculture, environmentresources, environment depend, physical, weather and climate, consumptionCalifornia.

hailey thornton's curator insight, August 21, 2014 10:19 AM

this is a map that shows the  drought in the united states of america. 

over the past decade the drought has gotten ever so more drastic. most of the drought is in the central parts  and the west coast of america .I  assume  that as the years progress the conditions for these parts of america will only progress to worsen. 

                  ~h.t.

Nancy Watson's curator insight, August 24, 2014 8:00 PM

Whether global warming or just one of the heat and cooling cycles, this drought is extensive and making an impact on food prices.

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California's Drought

California's Drought | ApocalypseSurvival | Scoop.it

"California has had three consecutive years of below average rainfall and most reservoirs are far below their designed capacity; for a state with a growing population with limited water resources this is alarming news that has many politicians, officials and residents worried. This winter was especially mild; nice for bragging to friend back East about how gorgeous the weather is during a polar vortex spell, but horrible for the snow pack and accumulation."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 10, 2014 2:45 PM

Most of California’s water originates for the snow pack in Western mountains ranges so this drought is expected to get worse this summer. The major urban areas have limited local water resources so they draw water from large area to bring in sufficient water for these burgeoning metropolitan regions.


Questions to Consider: What are some reasons (both from human and physical geography) for this severe drought? What can be done in the short-term to lessen the problem? What can be done to make California’s water situation better for the next 50 years?


Tags: physical, weather and climate, consumptionCaliforniaLos Angeles, water, environment, resources, environment dependurban ecology.

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Innovation Design In Education - ASIDE: Organic Food: A Lesson In Information Literacy

Innovation Design In Education - ASIDE: Organic Food: A Lesson In Information Literacy | ApocalypseSurvival | Scoop.it

"As we head into the throws of the summer and the coming onslaught of fresh produce from local growers hitting the markets, we thought it might be helpful to provide a little information literacy into the world of organic foods. We’ve long taught our students to read the nutrition labels...but now that organic food has become mainstream in supermarket chains, it makes sense to educate our students about organics as well."


Via Beth Dichter
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Beth Dichter's curator insight, August 1, 2013 8:03 PM

This post provides a wide variety of resources that will help you teach students about the difference between organic and non-organic foods. It is pretty amazing to see that 78% of families purchase organic foods (data is from the Organic Trade Association).
Along with the infographic shown above you will find a video that discusses what organic foods are and notes that just because something is organic does not mean it is healthy, a link to an infographic that shows what the word organic really means, a link to an infographic that teaches you how to read those small lables that show up on produce (called PLUs), and links to several other sources.

This post discusses the need to for students to become "information literate" in terms of organic foods, yet our students need to become "information literate" in many areas. The wide variety of materials provides sufficient information in this area, and may help students learn that a wide variety of information is necessary to become literate in other areas.

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China's Water Crisis

China's Water Crisis | ApocalypseSurvival | Scoop.it
For years, China claimed to hold an estimated 50000 rivers within its borders. Now, more than half of them have abruptly vanished.

Via Seth Dixon
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Paige Therien's curator insight, April 26, 2014 12:04 AM

China is attributing the disappearance of over 50 percent of their country's rivers to inaccurate sources; more effective technologies today give an accurate picture of China's waterways compared to the former data based off of sources from the  1950's.  While it is probably true to some extent that previous numbers were off, there still needs to be much concern for the state of China's current waterways and why waterways that once existed have disappeared.

Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 3, 2014 4:48 PM

Cutting corners in safety and cleanliness has caused pollution in the rivers. All the money they saved cutting corners now has to be invested in diverting clean water to northern areas of the country. I hope someday they realize that you cannot do things super cheaply without paying for it in another area.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 9:41 PM

What has happened to these rivers? Are they purposely being depleted from China? How do they expect to supply water for their residents if they are building things over these used-to-be rivers?

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NASA Satellites Find Freshwater Losses in Middle East

NASA Satellites Find Freshwater Losses in Middle East | ApocalypseSurvival | Scoop.it
A new study using data from a pair of gravity-measuring NASA satellites finds that large parts of the arid Middle East region lost freshwater reserves rapidly during the past decade.

 

"[This] data show an alarming rate of decrease in total water storage in the Tigris and Euphrates river basins, which currently have the second fastest rate of groundwater storage loss on Earth, after India," said Jay Famiglietti, principal investigator of the study and a hydrologist and professor at UC Irvine. "The rate was especially striking after the 2007 drought. Meanwhile, demand for freshwater continues to rise, and the region does not coordinate its water management because of different interpretations of international laws."

 

Tags: water, environment, consumption, resources, environment depend, Middle East, Iraq.


Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 24, 2013 10:00 PM

This is a perfect example of geospatial technologies can lead to a better understanding of how the Earth's physical systems are changing because of human geography.  Teaching geography is about showing how these systems are interconnected.   

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, March 19, 2014 9:24 AM

Water is a big issue in an arid area.  The fact that we can measure the amount of groundwater present in an area with a satellite is amazing to me.  The issue of water rights and control in this region will someday over take that of oil rights and use in my opinion.  Once people get used to free flowing water to use on demand it will cause problems politically when these sources of ground water inevitably dry up.

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Where Does Your Water Come From?

Where Does Your Water Come From? | ApocalypseSurvival | Scoop.it

This interactive map documents where 443 million people around the world get there water (although the United States data is by far the most extensive).  Most people can't answer this question.  A recent poll by The Nature Conservancy discoverd that 77% of Americans (not on private well water) don't know where their water comes from, they just drink it.  This link has videos, infographics and suggestions to promote cleaner water.  This is also a fabulous example of an embedded map using ArcGIS Online to share geospatial data with a wider audience.  

 

Tags: GIS, water, fluvial, environment, ESRI, pollution, development, consumption, resources, mapping, environment depend, cartography, geospatial. 


Via Seth Dixon
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Nic Hardisty's comment, October 15, 2012 9:01 AM
I was definitely unaware of where my drinking water came from. This is nice, user-friendly map... Hopefully it gets updated regularly, as it will be interesting to see how these sources change over time.
Bonnie Bracey Sutton's curator insight, July 1, 2013 3:55 PM

water is a resource we all depend on. Some of my best studies were on local Chesapeake Bay issues.

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California Drought Tests History of Endless Growth

California Drought Tests History of Endless Growth | ApocalypseSurvival | Scoop.it
A punishing drought is forcing a reconsideration of whether the aspiration of untrammeled growth that has for so long been the state’s engine has run against the limits of nature.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 6, 8:30 PM

Major urban areas in California have limited local water resources so they draw water from large area to bring in sufficient water for these burgeoning metropolitan regions.  With this current drought getting worse, California has ordered emergency water restrictions on residents while companies and large farms have been granted exemptions even though they account for 82% of the state's annual water consumption (residential accounts for 12%). Almond farms alone consume 10% of the state's water, and many agricultural crops are incredibly water intensive land uses.  A better way to think of it isn't just about raw water usage though.  A better question to ask would be this--how does one gallon of water translate into calories that most efficiently feed people?


Questions to Ponder: How does the concept of carrying capacity relate to California urban growth/drought issues?  California passed its carrying capacity?  How are demographics, economics, politics and the environment intertwined in California?  What are the environmental limits on urban growth and development? 


Tags: physical, weather and climate, consumptionCalifornia, water, environment, resources, environment dependurban ecology.

LEONARDO WILD's curator insight, April 9, 8:49 AM

The mathematics of endless growth due to economic monetary rules has a clear outcome.

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Protecting an Ocean at Risk

"Pristine Seas is an exploration, research, and media project to find, survey, and help protect the last wild places in the ocean. These pristine places are unknown by all but long-distance fishing fleets, which have started to encroach on them. It is essential that we let the world know that these places exist, that they are threatened, and that they deserve to be protected.  Learn more about Pristine Seas here: http://ocean.nationalgeographic.com/ocean/explore/pristine-seas/ "


Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 12, 12:35 PM

I was enchanted hearing Enriq Sala discuss his passion for ocean biodiversity and purity.  This passion, combined with scientific exploration and political advocacy is the backbone of a National Geographic's Pristine Seas project.  Here is one news story about the Seychelles, and how they are trying to manage their fishing industries to promote sustainability and hopefully the Pristine Seas project will lead to greater awareness of the need for ocean conservation. 


Tags: water, conservation, National Geographicphysical, biogeography, environmentpollution, resources.

Emily Coats's curator insight, March 24, 12:41 PM

INDUSTRIALIZATION 

Fishing and Urban Development have detrimentally destroyed our oceans, and we have polluted the seas at such a high level. Urban growth and over fishing have caused our oceans to be polluted, and we are killing the diversity in Earth's waters. It is essential that we preserve marine life and stop polluting the ocean and the creatures that inhabit it. 

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Peak Oil: The End of the Oil Age

Peak Oil: The End of the Oil Age | ApocalypseSurvival | Scoop.it

"It has taken between 50-300 million years to form, and yet we have managed to burn roughly half of all global oil reserves in merely 125 years or so."


Via Seth Dixon, ApocalypseSurvival
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Stephen Zimmett's curator insight, October 8, 2014 1:47 PM

the fact that oil is doomed is not such a bad thing perhaps fracking but I believe that solar energy is the way of the future

Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, October 14, 2014 4:28 AM

Peak Oil: The End of the Oil Age

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, October 27, 2014 11:40 AM

Resources shape the behavior of people living in a given geographical region. On Earth, the abundance and efficiency of oil has caused our societies to be built and operated with the use of oil. Human's needed fuel and found oil to be a natural resource that could fit their needs. But all good things must come to an end. Even though oil and gas are cheap and efficient ways of fueling our society, there are disastrous consequences like environmental degregation and over dependence on foreign oil that leads countries to be entangled in conflict that cost lives everyday. Now that we have the analytically tools to project when oil will run out it allows people to reevaluate their use of oil and gas and weigh the cost of using a resources that will eventually run out and leave the earth in ecological distress. The global oil reserves have been cut in half in just 125 years, although this use of oil led to many technological and medical advances that propelled society into an age of advancement unprecedented it is time to pull back the reigns and calibrate our expectations on how much oil and gas we should keep using.

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The Last Drop: America's Breadbasket Faces Dire Water Crisis

The Last Drop: America's Breadbasket Faces Dire Water Crisis | ApocalypseSurvival | Scoop.it
Editor's note: This story is one in a series on a crisis in America's Breadbasket –the depletion of the Ogallala Aquifer and its effects on a region that hel...

Via Seth Dixon
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Linda Denty's curator insight, July 24, 2014 6:46 PM

Could this happen in Australia also?

Jamie Strickland's curator insight, July 25, 2014 10:46 AM

Thanks to my good friend, Seth Dixon for the original scoop.  There had been quite a bit of news reporting on the drought in central California this year, but this midwestern region has been experiencing water stress for years with little national attention.  I plan to use this article in both an upcoming presentation as well as an example when I teach "Tragedy of the Commons" in my Environmental Dilemma class.

Kate Buckland's curator insight, July 26, 2014 10:32 PM

Good to compare to how we use water resources in Australia

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HowStuffWorks "How the Slingshot Water Purifier Works"

HowStuffWorks "How the Slingshot Water Purifier Works" | ApocalypseSurvival | Scoop.it
The Slingshot water purifier is explained in this article. Learn about the Slingshot water purifier.

Via Joel Barker
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Joel Barker's curator insight, October 22, 2013 11:23 AM

Best explanation I've seen on Dean Kamen's clean water invention. JB

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An Underground Pool Drying Up

An Underground Pool Drying Up | ApocalypseSurvival | Scoop.it

Portions of the High Plains Aquifer are rapidly being depleted by farmers who are pumping too much water to irrigate their crops, particularly in the southern half in Kansas, Oklahoma and Texas. Levels have declined up to 242 feet in some areas, from predevelopment — before substantial groundwater irrigation began — to 2011.

 


Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 20, 2013 12:29 PM

The article connected to this map from the New York Times can be found here.  "Two years of extreme drought, during which farmers relied almost completely on groundwater, have brought the seriousness of the problem home. In 2011 and 2012, the Kansas Geological Survey reports, the average water level in the state’s portion of the aquifer dropped 4.25 feet — nearly a third of the total decline since 1996."


Tags: wateragriculture, environment, consumption, resources, environment depend.

Michael Miller's curator insight, May 20, 2013 1:41 PM

The recent PBS special on the Dust Bowl also addressed this current problem and how some American farmers are not learning from past mistakes.

Bonnie Bracey Sutton's curator insight, September 2, 2013 5:58 PM

Really helpful information. Thank you. I had been wondering about this.Students should have an awareness of the water problems we have , and of various groundwater problems. Thank you.

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Freshwater Stores Shrank in Tigris-Euphrates Basin

Freshwater Stores Shrank in Tigris-Euphrates Basin | ApocalypseSurvival | Scoop.it
An arid region grew even drier between 2003 and 2009 due to human consumption of water for drinking and agriculture.

Via Seth Dixon
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Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, March 19, 2014 9:14 AM

The use of water is an increasing problem in the arid regions of the world.  The use of more sophisticated irrigation systems allow for more planting which requires more water.  Coupled with increasing towns and cities needing fresh water for the inhabitants this decrease in fresh water will only continue to trend.

Amy Marques's curator insight, April 24, 2014 12:52 PM

What's happening in the Tigris-Euphrates Basin is similar to what is happening to the Aral Sea. Freshwater Stores Shrank in just 4 years. Humans are drastically altering the landscape and if we don't start to find others ways of doing things and change the way in which we do agriculture and use our water, there could be a serious water shortage for millions of people.

James Hobson's curator insight, October 22, 2014 6:24 PM

(Southwest Asia topic 2)

The area known as the Cradle of Humanity is becoming less hospitable. Though natural climate change can be attributed to the dryer conditions, humans have made just as much of an impact. Increased water usage leads to less reserve. Impacts stretch further, however. Less water flow below the dam can lead to changes in sedimentation patterns and disrupt wildlife habitats, potentially causing harm to wildlife.

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Fresh Water Resources

View full lesson: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/where-we-get-our-fresh-water-christiana-z-peppard Fresh water accounts for only 2.5% of Earth's...

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 12, 2013 2:45 PM

How much of the Earth's water is fresh water?  How much of that is used for industrial, agricultural or domestic uses?  Why is groundwater becoming increasingly utilized?  Enjoy this TED-ED video for the answers. 


Tags: water, environment, consumption, resources, environment depend.

Agron S. Dida's comment, December 17, 2013 5:33 AM
Ben, there is a good link about the lack of water: http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/12/131216154330.htm#.UrAC_n3F2FA.twitter