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Video: Step Into a Refugee Camp

Video: Step Into a Refugee Camp | ApocalypseSurvival | Scoop.it
The Zaatari refugee camp in Jordan is one of the largest Syrian camps in the world. In the fall, we visited the camp live with our audience. Here’s what we heard from the refugees and from you.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 3, 8:35 AM

If you want to humanize the massive refugee crisis, and have lives and stories to connect to statistics, this 11 minute video shows what life is like in a refugee camp, and goes into the hopes, dreams, and life stories of the refugees. 

 

TagsMiddleEast, Jordan, Syria, political, refugees.

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Global Refugee Crisis

"This video shows you why the refugees crossing the Mediterranean by boat can't just fly to Europe."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 18, 2015 2:30 PM

Not since the end of World War II have there been so many refugees seeking safety.  There are several regional hot spots of political, ethnic and religious turmoil; many are now asking how the global community should response to the worst refugee crisis in generations.


Tags: migration, political, refugees.

Bonnie Bracey Sutton's curator insight, June 19, 2015 9:35 AM

Global population shakeup.

Nancy Watson's curator insight, June 19, 2015 10:14 AM

Population-refugee,asylum seeker, not internally displaced person. FRQ #3 2015

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Interactives: War and Refugees

Interactives: War and Refugees | ApocalypseSurvival | Scoop.it

UNHCR has been attempting to count the world's refugees since it was created. If you want to find out which years resulted in the worst displacement, which were the biggest countries of origin and which were the biggest countries of asylum, use the interactive map.


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Emilie Kochert's curator insight, September 8, 2013 4:25 AM

via gduboz

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, October 6, 2014 12:16 PM

unit 2

Emma Conde's curator insight, May 26, 2015 10:16 PM

Unit 2: Population and Migration

 

This article features an interactive map that displays the numbers of IDPs (internally displaced persons) made by the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees. You are able to look through the years and see the varying amounts of IDPs, as well as the countries that produced the most of them and which continue to.

 

This goes along with the human geography theme of refugees and IDPs, and this is a very helpful article in providing a simple way to see an overview of where and to what extent this most occurs. 

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Why Africa’s migrant crisis makes no sense to outsiders

Why Africa’s migrant crisis makes no sense to outsiders | ApocalypseSurvival | Scoop.it

"Violence and insecurity are so bad that other war-torn countries have become sites of refuge."

 

In 2015, nearly 100,000 Ethiopians and Somalis traveled by boat to Yemen, one of the world's most dangerous countries. Last year, nearly 5,000 citizens of Congo, which is fighting powerful rebel groups, were seeking refuge in the Central African Republic, itself torn apart by civil war. And yet 10,000 Burundians have fled their country's own growing civil unrest for Congo. Thousands of Nigerians escaping the extremist Islamist group Boko Haram have gone to Chad, where different strains of that same insurgency conduct frequent deadly attacks. 

 

Developing countries have long taken in a disproportionate number of the world's refugees — roughly 80 percent, according to the United Nations. But even for migration experts and relief workers, the willingness of refugees to leave one war for another is shocking. It's also proving an enormous challenge for humanitarian agencies, which are already overstretched and often not equipped to welcome refugees in countries that are still racked by conflict.

 

Tags: refugees, Africa, migration, conflict, political, war. 


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Can these satellite images save lives? The U.N. thinks so

Can these satellite images save lives? The U.N. thinks so | ApocalypseSurvival | Scoop.it
Stunning images taken from space put the world's crises into context.

 

U.N. satellite imagery has tracked the evolution of the camp since its creation. The exponential growth is remarkable.  The refugee camp is rapidly taking the shape of a real city — structured, planned and even separated into neighborhoods and subject to gentrification.

 

Tags: refugees, migration, conflict, political, war, squatter, urban, unit 7 cities, remote sensing, geospatial. 

 


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tom cockburn's curator insight, February 27, 2015 5:13 AM

Raises a number of serious questions.Not only about the middle East but about habitation,cultural development and resource distribution and deployment inequalities

Norka McAlister's curator insight, March 15, 2015 8:00 PM

I definitely think that it would. It is impressive to see how a urban planning affected the land designed by the refuges. Within a few years through satellite imaging, we can witness and appreciate how  the Zaatarie refugee campus went from a few refugees to a total urbanized area receiving and distributed more than 85,000 refuges in the area. Urban planning plays a big role in regards to how display all populations. However, we have to take in consideration that when a massive population in one area is displayed, urban area is also relevant in terms of disciplines, public healthy, collaboration to live under a community rules. On other hand, natural disasters and destruction by war can wipe out entire cities within seconds. The satellite images were able to show the destruction that took place in the Syrian city of Hamas after natural diasters devastated the region and the wartorn afternmath of Gaza city. Natural disasters and war trigger a massive migration of refugees in search for better a life and opportunity.

Max Minard's curator insight, March 21, 2015 9:26 PM

This report refers to the Zaatari refugee camp in Jordan which is experiencing rapid growth in population with 85,000 citizens and is even starting to look as a "city built form scratch". The reason geographers think that satellite imagery can save refugee lives is because it allows them to view areas of the camp in which they are unable to reach on ground. This information will help health workers pinpoint these certain hidden areas and tend to the people who are there. This use of satellite imagery centers around the camps rapid growth in population, making it quite a challenge to scale on ground. 

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Why these Somali refugees do not want to leave Kenya

Why these Somali refugees do not want to leave Kenya | ApocalypseSurvival | Scoop.it

"For millions of refugees across Africa life is a daily struggle.  Many dream of one day returning to their homeland while others have spent decades building a new life.  On World Refugee Day, BBC Focus on Africa's Anne Soy visits a Somali family in Nairobi, Kenya, who cannot imagine returning to their roots."


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Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, March 17, 2014 5:04 PM

No matter where you grow up, you form roots to your native land. Times are tough across the globe, especially for those living in Africa. While families plant their roots and look for ways to make things better, sometimes the best way is to leave. What makes people stay when their hometown roots are at rock bottom?

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 3:59 PM

Some people want to stay close to their heritage and native land. Others have no interest in their homelands and want to get away fast. This family doesn't know anything besides being refugees and they want to stay and build their lives there.

Kendra King's curator insight, April 27, 2015 12:39 PM

No one should have to be burdened with returning to a failed state, which is exactly what Somali is. As the main male figure in this clip mentioned, the conditions of the failed state he left 20 years ago has only gotten worse. It would make little sense for him or his family to return because there is no economic opportunity and no government stability. At least in Kenya, this family now has "a modest living." If this family were to return, the family would struggle to survive. If I were in their shoes, I would feel the same way. A decent standard of living is just as important as a safe community. For even though their is less violence to instantly kill people, starvation and disappear from lack of financial and governmental support would eventually prematurely kill people. So without either, I wouldn't return. Thus, I agree that the decision of a refugee to return should be left up to them as the reparation program between Kenya and Somali are currently doing.

 

Leaving ones country behind is still a tough choice. Abandoning the area increases "brain drain" and the man power to make the situation better. During our class on the Caribbean, it was mentioned that the government of countries facing these problems will try to attract their population back through incentives. In a failed state, the government isn't strong enough to incentivize people to come back. So, who does take care of this region? Someone with a great sense of duty to their country more than likely. For instance, Nelson Mandela was extremely smart and could easily have turned his back on the harsh conditions facing his country. Yet, he didn't and eventually become the leader needed to improve the standard of living in South Africa. Now I realize this was never a failed state, but their were still plenty of problems within the area that made staying harder that it should have been for the citizen of a country. So ultimately, the people who will have the greatest impact are those who have the sense of duty to their country. This isn't something every refugee will feel and as mentioned earlier, I can't blame them. It takes a rare selflessness and strong sense of courage that few people have.  For those that do though, their country will be indebted to them forever.