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Yes, Yellowstone's Roads Just Melted. No, There's No Reason to Panic

Yes, Yellowstone's Roads Just Melted. No, There's No Reason to Panic | ApocalypseSurvival | Scoop.it

"Last week, a major tourist thruway in Yellowstone National Park had to be shut down because the road melted. The road’s Wicked Witch of the West impression was caused by high temperatures in both the air and under the ground. Yellowstone sits atop a volcanic hotspot, and that heat helped cause the asphalt to soften and oil to well up onto the surface."

 


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The Habitable Planet

The Habitable Planet | ApocalypseSurvival | Scoop.it

"The Habitable Planet is a multimedia course for high school teachers and adult learners interested in studying environmental science. The Web site provides access to course content and activities developed by leading scientists and researchers in the field."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 14, 2:07 PM

Much like the Power of Place resources were created by Annenberg Learner to share World Regional Geography videos, the Habitable Planet has diverse resources for Physical Geography and Environmental Science.  In essence, it is an excellent free online textbook.   


Tags: textbook, environment, physical.

dilaycock's curator insight, May 15, 8:32 PM

This looks like a great site. I'm always impressed with the resources that come out of Annenberg. Many thanks to Seth Dixon for this Scoop.

Julie Wicks's curator insight, May 22, 8:10 PM

Unit 5 and 8 are resources for AC Geography year 7 units.

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Largest glacier calving ever filmed

"On May 28, 2008, Adam LeWinter and Director Jeff Orlowski filmed a historic breakup at the Ilulissat Glacier in Western Greenland. The calving event lasted for 75 minutes and the glacier retreated a full mile across a calving face three miles wide. The height of the ice is about 3,000 feet, 300-400 feet above water and the rest below water."

 

Tags: physical, geomorphology, landforms, erosion, climate change, Greenland.


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Flaviu Fesnic's comment, April 12, 3:31 PM
impressive !
Ms. Harrington's curator insight, April 13, 10:37 AM

More information at www.chasingice.com

Maricarmen Husson's curator insight, April 13, 2:15 PM

Adam LeWinter and Director Jeff Orlowski filmed a historic breakup at the Ilulissat Glacier in Western Greenland

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Earthquakes in the Classroom

"An 8.2-magnitude earthquake struck off the coast of northern Chile, generating a local tsunami.  The USGS reported the earthquake was centered 95 km (59 miles) northwest of Iquique at a depth of 20.1km (12.5 miles).  This video gives the context for this type of earthquake."  


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dilaycock's curator insight, April 3, 2:02 AM

From Seth Dixon: 

 "IRIS(Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology) creates teaching resources for teachers who want to use the current events such as yesterday's earthquake in Chile as an opportunity to discuss earth's physical systems and how they impact humanity.  They've produces slides, animations and PDFs for classroom use all while you were sleeping last night."  

Geofreak's curator insight, April 3, 1:37 PM

Hoe ontstond deze tsunami precies?

Ms. Harrington's curator insight, April 5, 10:52 AM

http://www.iris.edu/hq/programs/education_and_outreach/resources

 

Lesson Plans from the Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology (IRIS)

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Tsunami in Japan 2011

"This video captures some amazing footage of the 2011 tsunami in Japan."


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Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 23, 2:05 PM

This shocking video makes me so glad I live where I live, granted we have blizzards but I would definitely take the snow any day over a tsunami or a hurricane. In this video it was like a bad car accident I waanted to stare at the horrific site oof mother nature taking her course but that was just it it was too scary! Can't believe this is normal for some people in the regions that they choose to live in.

Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 3, 7:17 PM

Most people do not realize the sheer power of a tsunami. It has the force of the entire ocean depth behind each wave. It also pours onto land for hours until it stops then pours back into the ocean for another hour or so. Most people killed are killed by objects such as cars and buildings crushing them. Seeing videos such as these can help people get a better idea of the forces actually involved and maybe save lives.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 9:33 PM

I hope something like this never happens again. Tsunamis are unreal. They are literally horrifying and to see something like this captured on camera is actually really scary. Damn plate tectonics and people living on the water front.

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Inside the Colorado deluge

Inside the Colorado deluge | ApocalypseSurvival | Scoop.it

"Two things that helped make this rainfall historic are breadth and duration. Colorado can get much higher rainfall rates for brief periods and over small areas."


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Meagan Harpin's curator insight, September 16, 2013 3:40 PM

The devastating flooding in Colorado has impacted so many. The rainfall Colorado has experienced makes it the most on record. The massive amounts of flooding and devestation in areas like Boulder are caused by the highly populated valley areas.  

Al Picozzi's curator insight, September 17, 2013 4:13 PM

Almost seems like a perfect storm scenario.  Large amouts of rain over a long perod of time over a large area.  This combined with a late summer/early fall heat wave and tons of moisture in the air, with climate change all contributed to the disater in Colorado.  They also believe the changes made by people to the physical geography over the last hundred years or somade have contributed to teh flooding in the area.  Development can effect the way a place floods.  Where there were once open fields and trees, there are now parking lots and houses which just can't absorb rainfall.  Makes you ask the question, shouldn't there be more study of where we exapnd our cities and what effect this will have in case of a major rainfall, earthquake, blizzard, etc?

Tony Aguilar's curator insight, September 18, 2013 5:27 PM

      What was interesting about this particular deluge was how much rain fell and how it happened in such a short time. Meteroligist high wet density levels of vapor that rose to high altitutdes and was able to condense into water and help in a perfect combination of weather to create a powerfully dangerous flash flood.

    The article recounts a former major colorodo flood that occured in 1978 and had killed over 150 people during a centenial celebration.

   After this occurence warning signs were put up beside the roads to warn travelers of flash flood possiblities and to promote safety. These floods do not happen in Colorado often and are usually a surprise. They do not when the nextmajor flash flood may occur in the boulder region but they know through historical patterns that it will happen again. 

This article stood out to me because I have friends that live in these areas and had to run for safety and move their cars to prevent damage in these same areas. The good thing is that the people that I know from this area are doing ok.

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Floods cover more than half of Philippine capital

Floods cover more than half of Philippine capital | ApocalypseSurvival | Scoop.it

"Flooding caused by some of the Philippines' heaviest rains on record submerged more than half the capital Tuesday, turning roads into rivers and trapping tens of thousands of people in homes and shelters. The government suspended all work except rescues and disaster response for a second day."

 


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Christina Boyd's comment, August 21, 2013 12:16 AM
Poverty, Pollution over Population and Corruption spells a 6 letter word CHOICE.
Richard Miles's curator insight, September 5, 2013 7:29 PM

Good case study on flooding in LEDC

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, April 24, 2:13 PM

The Philippines which experiences monsoon weather is imperiled by the deforestation and clogged water ways due to increased population.  This country must do something to fix these issues or more large scale floods will likely be in its future.

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Popocatépetl

Popocatépetl | ApocalypseSurvival | Scoop.it

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 12, 2013 9:18 AM

This image is from June 11, 2013, but if you click on the link you will see an image of Popocatépetl that is refreshed every minute.  This massive volcano looms over Mexico City and plays a key role in the mythology of the city.  The images are taken from a relatively new station in Tochimilco (clouds or intense weather might occasionally limit the visibility of the volcano).


Tags: Mexico, physical.

sabina cardascia's curator insight, June 12, 2013 7:26 PM

horror!!!

Brett Sinica's curator insight, September 29, 2013 1:11 PM

Among active volcanos in the world, this would be an extremly devastating one if it were to explode.  Less than 50 miles from Mexico City, which is home to more than 20 million people in its entirety could be of threat.  Just this year in July, there was steam and ash released which cancelled flights in and out of Mexico City and Toluca.  That's a mere fraction of what could happen if this volcano had a full-blown explosion.  On a lighter note, on days with good weather, this volcano is quite a spectacle of nearby cities and is the second highest peak in Mexico.

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What is a Hotspot?

1) What is a hotspot? A volcanic "hotspot" is an area in the upper mantle from which heat rises in a plume from deep in the Earth. High heat and lower pressure at the base of the mantle facilitates melting of the rock. This melt, called magma, rises through cracks to the surface and forms volcanoes. As the tectonic plate moves over the stationary hot spot, the volcanoes are rafted away and new ones form in their place.


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Al Picozzi's curator insight, December 5, 2013 5:10 PM

Never really understood how island chains were made until now.  As the plate moves the iland is no longer growing and it begins to erode as a new island is created for the hotspot doesn't move the plate does.  That explains why the island of Hawaii is the largest island in the Hawaiian Island Chain..it is the yourgest island and the one the is currently under the hotspot...until it moves along the plate..which I do not believe will be in anyones life time.  It also helps explain how atolls were formed.  The plate moved so the island was no longer growing and though erosion of hundreds of thousands of years the center of the large island is gone while the ring is being supported by a coral reef.  Great site that really makes it easy to understand.

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, April 13, 2:09 PM

This video explains the geology of hotspots which are how many of the islands in the Pacific Ocean are formed. Convection of solid, hot material rises to the tectonic plate where it is trapped, heating the rock above to its melting point. The heat then forces the molten rock to the surface where it cools and creates volcanoes. Over millions of years, the tectonic plate drifts, but the hot spot does not, causing a series of volcanoes on the surface. The Hawaiian Islands were formed by this process, which is why the islands progress from large to small, with the smallest islands being the oldest, in the process of eroding completely away.

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 23, 6:23 PM

This video entails that mantel and where a hotspot for a volcanic eruption will take place. This video depicts the way at which a hot spot is located and what makes it erupt and cause an eruption in the firt place. It goes step by step ways to see the many different forms of volcanoes and where they start and end up at.

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Melting Glaciers Transform Alpine Landscape

Melting Glaciers Transform Alpine Landscape | ApocalypseSurvival | Scoop.it
Climate change is dramatically altering the Swiss Alps, where hundreds of bodies of water are being created by melting glaciers. Though the lakes can attract tourists and even generate electricity, local residents also fear catastrophic tidal waves.

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Magnus Gustafsson's curator insight, May 8, 2013 4:45 AM

What can we do learn of this? Will send this to my students.

Lorraine Chaffer's comment, July 4, 2013 10:36 PM
Inland water - management
Lorraine Chaffer's comment, July 4, 2013 10:36 PM
Climate change impacts
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Astrobleme

Astrobleme | ApocalypseSurvival | Scoop.it

"Lake Manicouagan lies in an astrobleme in central Quebec covering an area of approximately 1206 square miles—an area half the size of Delaware. An astrobleme is a scar left on the Earth’s surface from an impact of a meteorite. Lake Manicouagan is the result of one of the largest identified asteroid or comet impacts on Earth. In the middle of the lake, on Rene-Levasseur Island, Mount Babel rises 3,123 feet into the air.

 

Lake Manicouagan is thought to have formed about 212 million years ago plus or minus 4 million years.  This happened when an approximately 3.1 mile-diameter asteroid crashed into Earth toward the end of the Triassic period. Some scientists speculate that this impact may have been responsible for the mass extinction that wiped out more than half of all living species."


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Al Picozzi's curator insight, September 18, 2013 8:33 PM

This amazing picture shows how vulnerable the earth is to space born hazards.  This 3.1 mile-diameter asteroid might have caused 1/2 the living species on the earth at that time, 212 million years or so ago, to become extinct.  Man has the abilty to adapt to changes to the environment, unlike the dinosaurs.  The question is though do we have the ability to adapt to an event of this magnitude?  Hopefully we will not have to test out this question.

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NASA Satellites Find Freshwater Losses in Middle East

NASA Satellites Find Freshwater Losses in Middle East | ApocalypseSurvival | Scoop.it
A new study using data from a pair of gravity-measuring NASA satellites finds that large parts of the arid Middle East region lost freshwater reserves rapidly during the past decade.

 

"[This] data show an alarming rate of decrease in total water storage in the Tigris and Euphrates river basins, which currently have the second fastest rate of groundwater storage loss on Earth, after India," said Jay Famiglietti, principal investigator of the study and a hydrologist and professor at UC Irvine. "The rate was especially striking after the 2007 drought. Meanwhile, demand for freshwater continues to rise, and the region does not coordinate its water management because of different interpretations of international laws."

 

Tags: water, environment, consumption, resources, environment depend, Middle East, Iraq.


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 24, 2013 10:00 PM

This is a perfect example of geospatial technologies can lead to a better understanding of how the Earth's physical systems are changing because of human geography.  Teaching geography is about showing how these systems are interconnected.   

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, March 19, 9:24 AM

Water is a big issue in an arid area.  The fact that we can measure the amount of groundwater present in an area with a satellite is amazing to me.  The issue of water rights and control in this region will someday over take that of oil rights and use in my opinion.  Once people get used to free flowing water to use on demand it will cause problems politically when these sources of ground water inevitably dry up.

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Pink Lakes

Pink Lakes | ApocalypseSurvival | Scoop.it
Photo by Jean Paul Ferrero/Ardea/Caters News (via Exposing the Truth   Lake Hillier is a pink-coloured lake on Middle Island in Western Australia. Middle island is the largest of the islands a...

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Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 23, 6:01 PM

This lake is so majestic and beautiful but how does it have this pink color? Well it gets the pink color from the sand it is surrounded by and is one of the largest Middle islands in Australia. 

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, April 24, 8:13 PM

This beautiful lake is a phenomenon the reason for its color is still unknown but it makes a very memorable lake!

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 1, 10:44 AM

The cause of the pink lake is still a mystery. Scientists believe the pink could be due to lack of nutrients or other substances. I think this is truly remarkable! Its beautiful to say the least. 

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America’s recent drought history, animated

America’s recent drought history, animated | ApocalypseSurvival | Scoop.it

"California's drought just hit a new milestone: As of this week, 32.98 percent of the state is experiencing "exceptional" drought, making it the worst drought in the 14 years that the Department of Agriculture's Drought Monitor has tracked data."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 23, 9:23 AM

The recent drought in California has only deepened and this Washington Post article shows an animated map that highlights the temporal and spatial patterns in the drought data (hint--it's not pretty).  In a related note, May 2014 was the hottest May in recorded history.     


Questions to Consider: What are some reasons (both from human and physical geography) for this severe drought? What can be done in the short-term to lessen the problem? What can be done to make California’s water situation better for the next 50 years?


Tags: physical, weather and climate, consumptionCalifornia, water, environment, resources, environment dependurban ecology.

Leslie Hays's curator insight, June 25, 12:24 PM

As California's rain shortage continues, this may be a useful site for teachers and students to explore the drought over time. 

Character Minutes's curator insight, June 25, 12:56 PM

Use to emphasize the need to apply character traits of resourceful and thrifty.

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Block-Long Sinkhole Swallows Cars in Baltimore

Block-Long Sinkhole Swallows Cars in Baltimore | ApocalypseSurvival | Scoop.it

"A block-long sinkhole opened up in a residential neighborhood in rain-soaked Baltimore on Wednesday, devouring cars and forcing the evacuation of several houses."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 1, 4:35 PM

We like to think that the Earth beneath our feet is solid and that the configuration of the landforms in our neighborhood will be unchanging.  This a dramatic reminder that Earth's physical processes don't ever stop--even if we've built a city in that spot.  Watch this retaining wall collapse in this video.


Tags: physical, geomorphology, erosion, landformsweather and climateurban ecology.

Jim Doyle's curator insight, May 9, 10:57 PM
Block-Long Sinkhole Swallows Cars in Baltimore
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California's Drought

California's Drought | ApocalypseSurvival | Scoop.it

"California has had three consecutive years of below average rainfall and most reservoirs are far below their designed capacity; for a state with a growing population with limited water resources this is alarming news that has many politicians, officials and residents worried. This winter was especially mild; nice for bragging to friend back East about how gorgeous the weather is during a polar vortex spell, but horrible for the snow pack and accumulation."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 10, 2:45 PM

Most of California’s water originates for the snow pack in Western mountains ranges so this drought is expected to get worse this summer. The major urban areas have limited local water resources so they draw water from large area to bring in sufficient water for these burgeoning metropolitan regions.


Questions to Consider: What are some reasons (both from human and physical geography) for this severe drought? What can be done in the short-term to lessen the problem? What can be done to make California’s water situation better for the next 50 years?


Tags: physical, weather and climate, consumptionCaliforniaLos Angeles, water, environment, resources, environment dependurban ecology.

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Yellowstone National Park rattled by largest earthquake in 34 years

Yellowstone National Park rattled by largest earthquake in 34 years | ApocalypseSurvival | Scoop.it

"Yellowstone National Park, which sits atop one of the world's largest super-volcanoes, was struck on Sunday by a magnitude 4.8 earthquake, the biggest recorded there since February 1980, but no damage or injuries were immediately reported."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 31, 9:10 AM

The amazing geothermal activity in Yellowstone National park annually brings thousands of tourists to the region.  The reason why these geysers, hot springs and fumaroles are there is because of the what is just below the surface.  Watch a video (the 2 minute version or a 44 minute version) to see why this natural wonder is also a major geologic threat for earthquake and volcanic activity, which explains the reasons for this weekend's earthquake.   Not to be an alarmist, but this is why some fear another major eruption soon.

CSINowedu's curator insight, March 31, 9:23 AM

Yellowstone National Park, which sits atop one of the world's largest super-volcanoes, was struck on Sunday by a magnitude 4.8 earthquake, the biggest recorded there since February 1980, but no damage or injuries were immediately reported.

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'Absolute Bedlam' In The Philippines After Typhoon Haiyan

'Absolute Bedlam' In The Philippines After Typhoon Haiyan | ApocalypseSurvival | Scoop.it

The news from the Philippines, where it's feared that last week’s powerful Typhoon Haiyan killed more than 10,000 people, isn’t getting better as hundreds of thousands of people struggle to survive and authorities struggle to get help to them.

 

"Its absolute bedlam right now," says Richard Gordon, head of the Philippine Red Cross.  “There's an awful lot of casualties, a lot of people dead all over the place, a lot of destruction.”

 

According to the BBC, a huge international relief effort is underway, but rescue workers have struggled to reach some towns and villages cut off since the storm.

 

Tags: physical, environment, water, disasters, Philippines.


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Rebecca Farrea's curator insight, November 14, 2013 8:50 AM

Even though the death toll resulting from Typhoon Haiyan is around 1,000, it is expected to reach 10,000.  International aid will hopefully help cities such as Tacloban City recover from this storm.

Jack Born's curator insight, November 14, 2013 9:16 PM

This is insane. It has affected millions of people and and even killed people. Its good that so many people are going to help though.

Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 3, 7:05 PM

With so many of the citizens living on the coast, a large typhoon like this completely destroys most of the country. When this much devastation happens all at one time it takes a very long time to recover.

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Rapid Landscape Change

Rapid Landscape Change | ApocalypseSurvival | Scoop.it
BOULDER, Colo. -- National Guard helicopters were able to survey parts of Highway 34 along the Big Thompson River Saturday. Here are some images of the destruction along the roadway.

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Byron Northmore's curator insight, November 29, 2013 8:57 AM

CD 4: The human causes and effects of landscape degradation

Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 12, 2013 12:59 PM

By looking at these pictures you can see that the water just completely ruined this road. The road sunk in and collapsed as well. Will this road ever be safe to drive on again if it gets fixed?

megan b clement's comment, December 15, 2013 11:24 PM
National helicopters caught these pictures along the Thompson river while the water rages next to a road. The destruction of the water and its erosion had deteriorated the road.
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The Hottest Day On Record ... In Siberia?

The Hottest Day On Record ... In Siberia? | ApocalypseSurvival | Scoop.it
Did the Arctic region break a heat record?

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 27, 2013 10:46 PM

The Siberian Times is reporting a record heatwave for towns such as Norilsk that are both North of the Artic Circle and built on permafrost.  While on the global scale the climatic shifts are quite alarming, there are many in Siberia that see global warming as a mixed bag.  In what some would have you believe is an unrelated news item, the North Pole is experiencing the formation of large meltwater ponds


Tags: physical, weather and climate, Arctic, climate change.

Lauren Jacquez's curator insight, July 28, 2013 4:25 PM

Global warming...no...Siberia is supposed to be a cold dark place...according to my Dad!

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As coast erodes, names wiped off the map

As coast erodes, names wiped off the map | ApocalypseSurvival | Scoop.it
For decades, south Louisiana residents have watched coastal landmarks disappear as erosion worsened and the Gulf of Mexico marched steadily inward.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 9, 2013 2:54 PM

Just because you've mapped a physical land feature, it doesn't mean it will stay that way forever.  This is a reminder that the Earth and it's cultural and physical landscapes are constantly changing. 


Tagsmapping, erosion, landscape. 

Sylvain Rotillon's comment, May 9, 2013 2:57 PM
The eprverse effect of maps is that they give the false idea that our physical world is steady. It's the case as we see here for coastal environments, but also for rivers.
Ryan G Soares's curator insight, December 3, 2013 11:12 AM

I find it quite facinating how the world changes. Some of the worlds most beautiful things may not be here 30 years from now. It is quite humbling that things that man builds can be taken away by Mother Nature. As the years pass the memories made will be vanished by the environment.

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Erosion in Action

News 8 chief photojournalist Kevyn Fowler captured a road collapsing in Freeport, Maine during a storm.

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Francisco Javier 's curator insight, May 12, 2013 8:53 PM

Erosion in Action | @scoopit via @APHumanGeog http://sco.lt/...

Shelby Porter's curator insight, December 11, 2013 10:23 PM

Normally we see erosion on a piece of land over a long period of time. In this short video, we see what erosion can do to in mere minutes. It is scary to think how much the roads we drive on are eroding right underneath our cars. It is amazing how much the environment around us can change due to the weather. 

megan b clement's comment, December 16, 2013 12:30 AM
This video is crazy! It shows the erosion of a road during a storm. The water was supposed to run under the road and flow through a large pipe. As you can see after watching the video the road eventually erodes and then the pipe begins to bouy up and down. Later the road is completely deteriorated and the pipe ran down the river with the rest of the road.
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Out in the Great Alone

Out in the Great Alone | ApocalypseSurvival | Scoop.it
The Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race pushes participants to the brink on an unforgiving trek to the end of the world. And, as one writer who tracked the race by air discovers, that is exactly the point.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 25, 2013 2:06 PM

The Iditarod is as much about conquering the physical environment and harsh climates as any sporting event in the world.  This article about this famous Alaskan race also has a unique geo-visualization component to it that is worth exploring--it has a map showing where the action takes place in the article and as the reader scrolls through the article, the map changes and it highlights the progression along the trail.   


Tags: physical, weather and climatesport, Arctic, visualization.

chris tobin's comment, April 26, 2013 6:18 PM
very good story describing the long and dangerous trek. Its pretty amazing. I appreciated the video commentary and pictures of scenery and animals of the areas.
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Volcanic Forces, Human Impacts


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Rogério Rocha's comment, March 28, 2013 11:30 AM
Thanks for the post.
Josue Maroquin's comment, August 12, 2013 10:12 PM
Amazing how the ash spread out over the world
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NOVA: Earth From Space

NOVA: Earth From Space | ApocalypseSurvival | Scoop.it
Detailed satellite images reveal the web of connections that sustain life on Earth.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 17, 2013 4:34 PM

"Earth From Space is a groundbreaking two-hour special that reveals a spectacular new space-based vision of our planet. Produced in extensive consultation with NASA scientists, NOVA takes data from earth-observing satellites and transforms it into dazzling visual sequences, each one exposing the intricate and surprising web of forces that sustains life on earth."


This documentary shows something interesting for the physical geographer, human geographers, and geospatial technology specialists.  In other words, this touches on just about all things geographic (with cool images!).  The overarching theme is that so many things in this world that we wouldn't imagine are actually interconnected with excellent examples. 


Tags: remote sensing, geospatial, unit 1 Geoprinciples, physical.

Kenneth Holzman's comment, February 17, 2013 7:37 PM
Thanks so much for this link! I'd completely missed this on PBS, and it is EXACTLY the kind of video I'm trying to get my AP Human Geography students to watch right now. This is getting shared with ALL my kids ASAP. :-)
dilaycock's comment, February 18, 2013 4:02 PM
I just love that Scoop.it allows resources to be shared so easily, and in a manner that is so accessible to students everywhere. Thanks Kenneth.