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Surging Seas Interactive Map

Surging Seas Interactive Map | ApocalypseSurvival | Scoop.it
Global warming has raised global sea level about 8" since 1880, and the rate of rise is accelerating. Rising seas dramatically increase the odds of damaging floods from storm surges.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 27, 1:27 PM

This interactive map from Climate Central dramatically shows what locations are most vulnerable to sea level rise.  You can adjust the map to display anywhere from 1 to 10 feet of sea level rise to compare the impact to coastal communities.  This dynamic map lets to view other layers to contextualize potential sea level rise by toggling on layers that include, population density, ethnicity, income, property and social vulnerability.   

 

Tags: physical, weather and climate, climate change, environment, resources, watercoastalmapping, visualization, environment depend, political ecology.

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'Sedated by software': No one knows how to read maps anymore, experts say

'Sedated by software': No one knows how to read maps anymore, experts say | ApocalypseSurvival | Scoop.it
The Royal Institute of Navigation are concerned about the nation's cartographical know-how and have suggested schools start teaching basic navigation.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 19, 12:59 PM

Today, many are unable to navigate without GPS devices, but they still need to learn map reading skills. They are convinced that their apps can do all the work and that an old fashioned paper map is outdated technology, but their spatial thinking skills become atrophied. Spatial skills are crucial for understanding the world as a global citizen, to understand your local environs and for making scientific discoveries.  So teach a kid how to read a map...the sooner the better. 

 

Tagsmapping, K12, location.

Ruth Reynolds's curator insight, February 9, 1:11 AM

I agree !!! and it is fun

Jamie Mitchell's curator insight, March 8, 12:41 AM

Today, many are unable to navigate without GPS devices, but they still need to learn map reading skills. They are convinced that their apps can do all the work and that an old fashioned paper map is outdated technology, but their spatial thinking skills become atrophied. Spatial skills are crucial for understanding the world as a global citizen, to understand your local environs and for making scientific discoveries.  So teach a kid how to read a map...the sooner the better. 


 


Tagsmapping, K12, location.


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Paris Bloodshed May Be the Latest of Many ISIS Attacks Around the World

Paris Bloodshed May Be the Latest of Many ISIS Attacks Around the World | ApocalypseSurvival | Scoop.it
At least a dozen countries have had attacks since the Islamic State, or ISIS, began to pursue a global strategy in the summer of 2014.

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Chelsea Martines's curator insight, November 21, 2015 3:41 PM
The Paris attacks from ISIS are now being discovered as linked to other attacks that ISIS has planned out. They have up until now according to the article, done 'lone wolf' attacks and now are changing to bigger and city kind of attacks across the globe. They are taking over much of the Middle East and Africa, in hopes to make that area chaotic enough to start more global conflict and another world war, accoring to the article. There have been studies and research in tracking ISIS and they have found that attacks in many other cities in the world have been inspired by ISIS as well.
Matthew Richmond's curator insight, December 2, 2015 12:23 PM

These maps were very helpful in understanding the spread and threat of ISIS. It also helps the understanding of just what a wide range of places they have attacked is. They are capable of striking much of the world in the name of fundamentalism. However, the video of Muslim's chanting is one of those things that can kind of turn down the fear, especially of admitting refugees, that has gripped much of the world. We are as safe as we can be, but idea's are bulletproof and there's no end in sight to the elimination of Islamic Fundamentalism.

Lindley Amarantos's curator insight, December 4, 2015 10:55 AM

Read this article and fill out your Socratic seminar question sheet for the inner/outer circle on Tues, Dec 8

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Motion of Tectonic Plates

"This video is from the BBC documentary film Earth: The Power Of The Planet.  The clip is also embedded in this story map that tells the tale of Earth’s tectonic plates, their secret conspiracies, awe-inspiring exhibitions and subtle impacts on the maps and geospatial information we so often take for granted as unambiguous."


Tags: physical, tectonics, disasters, mapping, geospatial, mapping, video, ESRI.


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Help the Nepal Aid Effort By Making a Map

Help the Nepal Aid Effort By Making a Map | ApocalypseSurvival | Scoop.it
Become one of the citizen cartographers around the globe tracing and checking roads, buildings, and open spaces to assist people on the ground.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 29, 2015 8:42 AM

If you want to help Nepal, you can donate time and geospatial abilities by helping provide workers with better maps.  This is probably one of the easier on-ramps to collaborative mapping, and the help is desperately needed.  You can also have students explore the Nepal earthquake in ArcGIS online; this has become a 'teachable moment' and  IRIS provides powerpoint slides for teachers to this example in the classroom.


Tags: Nepal, disasters, physical, tectonics, mapping, geospatial.

Kristin Mandsager San Bento's curator insight, May 1, 2015 4:05 PM

This is a great effort.  You do have to take the tutorial to learn how to map for them.  Some of the images aren't very clear either.  It would seem to me that the government should provide high quality images from satellites.  I'm sure they have better images.  Also, many of the highly populated areas were completed.  The periphery seemed like it could use more help.  

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Changing The World, One Map At A Time

Maps have always been a source of fascination and intrigue. Today's maps, however, can also help to save lives during disasters, document human rights abuses and monitor elections in countries under repressive rule. This presentation will explain how today's live maps can combine crowds and clouds to drive social change.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 20, 2014 1:03 PM

On this day of giving thanks, I want to remind this community that geospatial skills can be used to help othersWant to see geographic knowledge and geospatial skills in action?  Crowd-sourced mapping is increasingly an important resource during an emergency.  Poorer places are often not as well mapped out by the commercial cartographic organizations and these are oftentimes the places that are hardest hit by natural disasters.  Relief agencies depend on mapping platforms to handle the logistics of administering aid and assessing the extent of the damage and rely on these crowd-sourced data sets made by people like you and me. 


Tagsdisasters, mapping, cartographyTED201, video.

Jon Olaizola's curator insight, November 28, 2014 11:55 AM

You can help!

Rich Schultz's curator insight, November 28, 2014 2:47 PM

Tedx

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This is what Louisiana stands to lose in the next 50 years

This is what Louisiana stands to lose in the next 50 years | ApocalypseSurvival | Scoop.it
The USGS says sea-level rise and sinking could claim up to 4,677 square miles of land along the coast if the state doesn’t implement major restoration plans.

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James Hobson's curator insight, September 15, 2014 9:23 AM

(North America topic 2)
This interactive map is an excellent tool for researching how low-lying delta areas such as southern Mississippi have changed over recent years, and for what underlying reasons. Although human activity has been largely responsible for the loss of valuable marshland (land development, canals, levees), it's nice to know that in some cases human activity has actually helped to promote it, even if it was not originally intended to do so.

It makes you think: what other unintended consequences human actions are having on the environment in other places and on other scales?

Giselle Figueroa's curator insight, September 28, 2014 9:24 PM

Is very crazy that soon these land will be gone. What really makes me worry is that in a few years all these land in Louisiana will be gone, what is going to happen to all these people who is living right know in these areas? What action government will take? This is a very worrying situation.

Jake Red Dorman's curator insight, November 13, 2014 11:04 AM

If I lived in Louisiana, I wouldn’t settle down near the coast. 2,000 square miles will be lost in about 80 years. The water will have risen to 4.3 feet, and Louisiana has an average height of 3 feet. That leaves everything outside of the protective levees underwater in due time. Many pipelines that serve 90% of the nation’s offshore energy production and 30% of its gas and oil supply that goes to 31 different states and over 2 million people will all need to find a new place to live if this continues. Once home to 700 people south of New Orleans is now home to nearly 15 residents. The water level has already been ruining homes for people in Louisiana.  

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Worst Hurricane

Worst Hurricane | ApocalypseSurvival | Scoop.it

"What's the worst Hurricane anyone in your town remembers?""


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Nancy Watson's curator insight, August 24, 2014 7:59 PM

Andrew  was bad, Katrina was most memorable

Giselle Figueroa's curator insight, September 21, 2014 1:24 AM

The worst Hurricane that I remember is Hurricane "Katrina" in 2005. I was living in Puerto Rico but I remember seen the devastating news. The largest number of deaths occurred in New Orleans, which was flooded because its levee system failed. Also "Katrina" was the hurricane that has caused more economic damage as well as one of the five deadliest hurricanes, in the history of the United States. It was a very sad event. I hope that does not happen again.

Jake Red Dorman's curator insight, October 29, 2014 1:51 PM

My father is actually good friends with a guy who he went to school with that specifically help clean up after natural disasters such as hurricanes. I got to talk to him for a little bit about hurricane Katrina, since that was his most recent natural disaster that he helped with at the time. He said it was probably one of the, if not the worst of the natural disaster to help clean and rebuild. He spent the most time with that natural disaster than any others he said. From de-flooding homes, to destroying homes, to rebuilding homes was one of the most strenuous things he has ever had to do in his career.

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How to Read a (Good) Map

How to Read a (Good) Map | ApocalypseSurvival | Scoop.it

"Just as you shouldn’t trust everything you read or see on television, you should never blindly trust information just because it is on a map. All maps posit arguments. Maps present information about how something is. All maps posit arguments. Maps present information about how something is. Just as there are no unbiased arguments, there are no unbiased maps."


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John Slifko's curator insight, November 23, 2013 5:09 PM

Map skills are vital in the study of democratic place and space. 

YEC Geo's curator insight, November 24, 2013 4:44 PM

Good advice.

Ignacio Garrido's curator insight, November 26, 2013 1:09 AM

Exercise 14 :

 

Read the news and answer the questions:

 

a.What is the news talking about ?

b. There are two maps.Maps that is down has these questions ( Answer them ) :

Who made the map?What is the purpose of the map? That is, what is the map attempting to communicate?Who is the intended audience? (It is important to remember that the map may not have been designed for you, but a more specialized audience.)Does the map effectively achieve its communication goals? Does it present an interesting story or argument?

c.Sum up the news ( five sentences in english )

d.Choose another map ( of Internert  if you want ) and answer the questions 1,2,3 i 4. Add the map.

 

Send by moodle.Good luck¡

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GPS Astray: Lost in Death Valley

GPS Astray: Lost in Death Valley | ApocalypseSurvival | Scoop.it

"Three women’s Death Valley day trip soured after their GPS led them to the edge of survival."


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Mike Carney's curator insight, September 30, 2013 4:48 PM

GPS devices are very useful tools, but if you don't know how to use them properly they can be very frustrating and sometimes can get you into trouble. On the surface a GPS seems like a pretty fool-proof navigation device, but that's giving people way too much credit. A lot of (older) people can have a hard time following them. Take my mother-in-law for example, she once got lost for a half hour on the ten minute drive from my house to the highway. Somehow she missed the ONE turn and apparently didn't understand how to make a U-turn. People generally go astray if they fail to update their GPS, don't know how to configure their settings properly, or follow the GPS blindly. People often forget that they can just use the GPS as a map and figure out their own routes when the GPS is being wonky. Its also a good idea to keep real maps in your car so you don't have to rely soly on the GPS. The women from the video were dealing with a GPS that was following inaccurate and outdated information. At a time like this its a good idea to pull over and get out the map rather than drive in circles until you run out of gas.

 

Ana Cristina Gil's curator insight, October 12, 2013 3:43 PM

       Is not always the best idea to only rely on you GPS when traveling, best thing to do is to get and updated maps.  Is always good to get information on where you are going, how long are you going to be there? So you can get enough supplies like food, water, clothes etc.  Also are you making other stops along the road? Let someone know where you going therefore; if something happened to you they know where to look for you, once again don’t always trust on electronic. Prepared AHEAD!!

Justin McCullough's curator insight, December 12, 2013 1:21 PM

Although I have grown up around technology, I've always been a little skeptical about its reliability. It is a good thing to have a GPS, but we should not rely solely upon it. Relying solely upon technolgy is not as good as it sounds. In some cases the GPS could be wrong and in instances such as these we need to be able to think for ourselves. Not having this ability is a dangerous situation. 

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In Kenya, Using Tech To Put An 'Invisible' Slum On The Map

In Kenya, Using Tech To Put An 'Invisible' Slum On The Map | ApocalypseSurvival | Scoop.it
A billion people worldwide live in slums, largely invisible to city services and governments — but not to satellites.

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John Blunnie's curator insight, July 28, 2013 1:11 PM

Great how tech and globalization can help represed people in other countries.

Meagan Harpin's curator insight, October 6, 2013 5:07 PM

The slum-mapping movement began in India almost a decade ago and migrated to africa, the idea of this is to make slums a reality to people who have never set foot in one before. The maps can be used in court to stop evictions or simply to raise awarance. I think this idea is on the right track of what needs to be done. These people need help and so many people incuding the governement pretend they arent their but with these maps as proof they can no longer do that.    

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, March 19, 2014 10:24 AM

Slums and squatter settlements are a problem that a lot of the developing world has to deal with.  The unsafe and unsanitary buildings cause headaches and problems for the leaders of the cities they surround.  This story is hopeful in that the city did manage to bring a water line out to get clean water to the people living in this area.  Perhaps this will lead to a better quality of life of the inhabitants of this particular slum.  Also the project of mapping such areas can be a useful tool for city planners to better regulate these areas and help the people that live there.,

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Food stamps put RI town on monthly boom-and-bust cycle

Food stamps put RI town on monthly boom-and-bust cycle | ApocalypseSurvival | Scoop.it

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 24, 2013 10:06 AM

Rhode Island is one of five states in which the number of people getting  help from the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP-formerly known as 'food stamps') has more than doubled since 2008. In 2012, 16 percent of its residents received aid from the program. Read the related article.  The article details how Woonsocket's economy is impacted by these monthly fluctuations is disposable income.  Why is Rhode Island one of that states with a doubling participation in this program?  What other spatial patterns to you see? 


Tags: Rhode Islandeconomic, mapping, poverty, community.

Dias Vidia's curator insight, April 2, 2013 2:05 AM

http://redgage.com/photos/macb/postage-us-liberty-of-all-15-c.html

Kendra King's curator insight, January 28, 2015 7:53 PM

The story of food stamps displays how the government aide helps more than the individuals in the short term. I always knew that the people on food stamps benefited because they are now obviously able to eat better than they would if left on their own. However, I never really realized just how much of the government money also went back into the businesses. Without that money I am sure some of the stores would have closed sooner. I say sooner because since this article was written in 2013 a good deal of stores in Woonsocket closed or relocated (Shaw’s, Walmart, Dots, Home Depot, and Staples). Seeing firsthand how many businesses closed of recent is a clear indication of how the aid wasn’t enough. Still even going based on the information in the article, there were other indications of Woonsocket’s lagging business economy. For instance, one section mentions how Jourie thought Woonsocket was a “town disappeared into twisting two-lane roads, shadowy mills and abandoned smokestacks.” Mills were a strong economic center so long ago that the buildings should have been updated by more modern businesses. Yet, this hasn’t happened. It is a wonder how Woonsocket hasn’t figured out a way to attract more business from surrounding towns sooner given that government aide won’t keep business going.

 

Still, the people under this system are part of a process that doesn’t seem to stop repeating. Following the perspective of Rebecka, you see how businesses just tries to tempt the consumers who all flock to the stores on the first of the month falsely believing they are getting a better deal. Then you watch Rebecka try to shop under stress thereby causing her to spend money she shouldn’t be either. Then, when all is said and done, she looks longingly at the start of the calendar for the next first of the month. It appears the first of the month is on her mind even before it is well in sight. This type of thinking seems to trap Rebecka in an endless cycle of poverty. While I sympathize for the women who tried to get more work, she shouldn’t just continue on in a dead end job while barely surviving on food stamps. Go back to school, spread out how you spend the money, (maybe try saving some of it for more necessary items rather than tattoos), and change the cycle. The factors in the article show how this could be hard to do, but it isn’t impossible for her to gain control of her own life either.     

 

While I understand this trap is partly a result of the economic recession, there were other factors at play.  The story was partly told from the perspective of someone with a high school degree, who seemed to stop school because of a child. Given how much little someone makes when an individual fails to continue his/her schooling it is no wonder she is on food stamps. Furthermore, the fact that Woonsocket is full of low income housing continues to explain why so many people with food stamps flock to the town. If the people can’t really afford homes than it is no surprise they are on food stamps too. Woonsocket’s housing prices have always been like this even before the economic recession though. As such, the town’s population was already dependent on food stamps (something I am well aware of given that I live in the town next door). So I wonder just how much the economic recession actually increased the use of food stamps on the already poverty stricken town. 

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Digital Map Error May Have Led To Minesweeper Grounding

Digital Map Error May Have Led To Minesweeper Grounding | ApocalypseSurvival | Scoop.it
A digital chart used by the minesweeper USS Guardian to navigate Philippine waters misplaced the location of a reef by about eight nautical miles, and may have been a significant factor when the ship drove hard aground on the reef on Jan.

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Mark Trinidad's comment, January 24, 2013 4:29 PM
strong magnetic current??
Deborah Vane's curator insight, January 25, 2013 10:45 AM

Digital gone wrong. 

Mark Trinidad's comment, January 30, 2013 5:26 PM
well they are already warned by PCG but they have their own water line..
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Why Children Still Need to Read (and Draw) Maps

Why Children Still Need to Read (and Draw) Maps | ApocalypseSurvival | Scoop.it
While many skills have become obsolete in the digital age, map reading remains an important tool for building children's spatial reasoning skills and helping them make sense of our world.

Via Seth Dixon
ApocalypseSurvival's insight:

Young people need to develop a mental map of their environs and an over-reliance on GPS/mapping apps are no substitute.  When these youth become drivers, they are unprepared to make spatially/navigational decisions because they lack map reading skills.  They might think that their apps can do all the work and that an old fashioned paper map is outdated technology, but their spatial thinking skills become atrophied. Spatial skills are crucial for understanding the world as a global citizen, to understand your local environs and for making scientific discoveries.  So teach a kid how to read a map...the sooner the better. 

 

Tags: education, K12, geography education, spatial, mapping.

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ApocalypseSurvival's curator insight, March 11, 9:15 AM

Young people need to develop a mental map of their environs and an over-reliance on GPS/mapping apps are no substitute.  When these youth become drivers, they are unprepared to make spatially/navigational decisions because they lack map reading skills.  They might think that their apps can do all the work and that an old fashioned paper map is outdated technology, but their spatial thinking skills become atrophied. Spatial skills are crucial for understanding the world as a global citizen, to understand your local environs and for making scientific discoveries.  So teach a kid how to read a map...the sooner the better. 

 

Tags: education, K12, geography education, spatial, mapping.

The Planetary Archives / San Francisco, California's curator insight, March 11, 6:25 PM

Young people need to develop a mental map of their environs and an over-reliance on GPS/mapping apps are no substitute.  When these youth become drivers, they are unprepared to make spatially/navigational decisions because they lack map reading skills.  They might think that their apps can do all the work and that an old fashioned paper map is outdated technology, but their spatial thinking skills become atrophied. Spatial skills are crucial for understanding the world as a global citizen, to understand your local environs and for making scientific discoveries.  So teach a kid how to read a map...the sooner the better. 

 

Tags: education, K12, geography education, spatial, mapping.

Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks's curator insight, March 13, 6:53 AM

Young people need to develop a mental map of their environs and an over-reliance on GPS/mapping apps are no substitute.  When these youth become drivers, they are unprepared to make spatially/navigational decisions because they lack map reading skills.  They might think that their apps can do all the work and that an old fashioned paper map is outdated technology, but their spatial thinking skills become atrophied. Spatial skills are crucial for understanding the world as a global citizen, to understand your local environs and for making scientific discoveries.  So teach a kid how to read a map...the sooner the better. 

 

Tags: education, K12, geography education, spatial, mapping.

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How Many People Have Been Shot in Your Neighborhood This Year? This Map Will Tell You.

How Many People Have Been Shot in Your Neighborhood This Year? This Map Will Tell You. | ApocalypseSurvival | Scoop.it

"Thanks to a nonprofit, nonpartisan project known as the Gun Violence Archive, data on gun homicides and nonfatal shootings is now available well before the federal government releases its statistics. Those data include location information that makes it possible to plot those shootings on a map showing how many have taken place in your vicinity."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, December 8, 2015 4:48 PM

Perspectives of gun rights and public safety are highly divided.  Part of those divisions are ideological, but there are also big differences between urban and rural America.  This map of the NRA's "report card" on the legislators of Congress shows some pretty powerful spatial patterns.  This interactive map of people how have been shot this year shows a decidedly differnt pattern that the first.  See also this infographic of mass shooting in the United States.

 

Questions to Ponder: How do most people feel about the second amendment where you live?  What about your local geography might influence those opinions? 

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Five reasons why we should still read maps

Five reasons why we should still read maps | ApocalypseSurvival | Scoop.it
The Royal Institute of Navigation says reliance on sat-navs is undermining map-reading skills. So why should we still read maps?

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bernieshoot's curator insight, June 5, 2015 6:56 AM

#geography #education 

Catherine Lamarque-Manuel's curator insight, June 6, 2015 5:55 AM
Lire un carte est toujours le début d'une histoire...
Adilson Camacho's curator insight, June 6, 2015 12:44 PM

É isso aí!

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How to Donate Time to Help in Nepal

How to Donate Time to Help in Nepal | ApocalypseSurvival | Scoop.it

"How 'crisis mappers' activate after a catastrophe...and how you can join them."

 

Tags: Nepal, disasters, physical, tectonics, mapping, geospatial.


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Yunus Khan's comment, May 7, 2015 2:10 AM
God save nepal people
Katie's curator insight, May 22, 2015 12:37 PM

In Nepal, there was recently an earthquake. Crisis mappers have been working on better mapping data. Better mapping data increases the quality of imagery. Better mapping data greatly helps reduce suffering and saves lives. This is an example of how to use maps and geospatial data.  

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Without mental maps, we’re lost

Without mental maps, we’re lost | ApocalypseSurvival | Scoop.it
Elwood was a senior geographer working on the ground-floor of the very global positioning systems (GPS) and geographic information systems (GIS) he will throw up for discussion in his TEDx talk.

His question: Are we surrendering our innate mental map making abilities to technology and relying on and trusting it too much? And for TEDx audiences only, he’ll toss out ideas on ways to prevent that from happening.

 

Tags: mapping, GPS, cartography, TED, 201.


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Jeff Cherry's curator insight, January 12, 2015 9:08 AM

The mind is a terrible thing to waste.

Wyatt Fratnz's curator insight, March 18, 2015 8:08 PM

This text tells about a geographer who exaggerates today's modern dependency of Global Positioning Systems and Mapping, and the importance of still developing a mental map. It is important because lack of reliance of our mental maps leads to a primal fear and increasing instances of the feeling of being lost. The challenge is presented of how we stimulate technology in our mental maps. 

 

This article describes technological and mental process of mapping and how we should use it in our everyday lives. This is important because it gives humans a sense of direction and tells us how to keep it.

Carlee Allen's curator insight, March 26, 2015 6:20 PM

This is an article that explains and adds on to the fact that we Americans have begun too reliant on technology. Keith explains how kids now a days don't have a geographical sense and how it is really going to hurt them in the future.

 

I thought that this article was interesting, because it is a pretty controversial topic and very relatable.

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Giant Concrete Arrows Across America

Giant Concrete Arrows Across America | ApocalypseSurvival | Scoop.it
Every so often, a hiker or a backpacker will run across something puzzling: a ginormous concrete arrow, as much as seventy feet in length, just sitting in the middle of scrub-covered America. What are these giant arrows? Jeopardy champ Ken Jennings solves the mystery.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 20, 2014 2:18 PM

This is fascinating...just because a technology is old and outdated in modern society doesn't mean it wasn't ingenious.  The original mathematicians who calculated angles and distances study geometry so they could navigate and 'measure the Earth.' Before GPS, these giant arrows helped pilots navigate across the United States; they are part of the genealogical strands of navigational technology.   Mathematics can be incredibly spatial as well as geospatial.   


Tagsmapping, GPS, math, geospatial, location, historical.

Rich Schultz's curator insight, November 26, 2014 1:35 PM

Very intriguing!

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Why everyone should be able to read a map

Why everyone should be able to read a map | ApocalypseSurvival | Scoop.it
New research suggests that map reading is a dying skill in the age of the smartphone. Perish the thought, says Rob Cowen

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Lindley Amarantos's curator insight, September 5, 2014 9:17 AM

this can explain why it is important to NOT always rely on technology. It is good to keep your brain active and the spatial awareness that comes with reading a map is invaluable

Dolors Cantacorps's curator insight, September 5, 2014 3:13 PM

Practiquem-ho a classe doncs!

Richard Thomas's curator insight, July 30, 2015 10:52 PM

Despite the gendered overtones of the article (that it's important for men to learn to read a map), this is some good advice, regardless of gender.  The vocabulary and concepts of maps can strengthen spatial cognition and geography awareness.  While GPS technology can help us in a pinch, relying primarily on a system that does not engage our navigation skills will weaken our ability to perform these functions.  While it intuitively makes sense, that the 'mental muscles' would atrophy when not used, it is a reminder that an overuse of geospatial technologies can be intellectually counterproductive.  So break out a trusty ol' map, but more importantly, be a part of the spatial decision-making process. 


Tags: mapping, spatial, technology, education.

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CrisisWatch: The Monthly Conflict Situation Report

CrisisWatch: The Monthly Conflict Situation Report | ApocalypseSurvival | Scoop.it
Mapping global conflict month by month.

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Giovanni Sonego's curator insight, June 19, 2014 4:15 AM

Questa mappa interattiva vi permette, muovendovi sui singoli paesi, di leggere un aggiornamento sulle situazioni di conflitto in tutto il mondo. 


L' International Crisis Group è una organizzazione indipendente, non governativa e no-profit dedicata alla prevenzione e alla risoluzione dei conflitti. Hanno creato questa mappa interattiva per rendere più semplice e immediato l'aggiornamento sui principali conflitti nel mondo. 

Claudine Provencher's curator insight, June 19, 2014 5:40 AM

This looks like an excellent tool for students of international relations.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, June 23, 2014 12:26 PM

unit 4 --but really a great overall course resource!

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How Online Mapmakers Are Helping the Red Cross Save Lives in the Philippines

How Online Mapmakers Are Helping the Red Cross Save Lives in the Philippines | ApocalypseSurvival | Scoop.it
Volunteers across the world are building the digital infrastructure for the organization's Typhoon Haiyan relief efforts

Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 12, 2013 2:28 PM

Want to see geographic knowledge and geospatial skills in action?  Crowd-sourced mapping is increasingly an important resource during an emergency.  Poorer places are often not as well mapped out by the commercial cartographic organizations and these are oftentimes the places that are hardest hit by natural disasters.  Relief agencies depend on mapping platforms to handle the logistics of administering aid and assessing the extent of the damage and rely on these crowd-sourced data sets.  Can you join in and help?


Tags: disasters, mappingPhilippines, STEM.

Tony Aguilar's curator insight, November 13, 2013 3:32 PM

online maps are being used to help locate the best way possible to help transport food and resources to those most in need. They van locate bridges and the world is pulling together with tehcnolgy and accurate maps to help the  American red Cross maximize in time and manpower. It seems that after Hurricane Katrina and the Earthquakes in Haiti and Japan, We have been improving our strategies for how to best help people around the globe come together put our time energy and resources together to best help people whose lives have been devasted and crushed by the forces of mother nature.

 

Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 3, 2014 7:14 PM

Having a map of the current landscape, after the typhoon will speed up relief and rescue efforts by showing areas to land and set up help stations. The digital world is immediate now and this will change how organizations such as the Red Cross provide relief to suffering people.

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When Google Earth Goes Awry

When Google Earth Goes Awry | ApocalypseSurvival | Scoop.it

"These jarring moments expose how Google Earth works, focusing our attention on the software. They reveal a new model of representation: not through indexical photographs but through automated data collection from a myriad of different sources constantly updated and endlessly combined to create a seamless illusion; Google Earth is a database disguised as a photographic representation. These uncanny images focus our attention on that process itself, and the network of algorithms, computers, storage systems, automated cameras, maps, pilots, engineers, photographers, surveyors and map-makers that generate them.”


Via Seth Dixon, ApocalypseSurvival
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 23, 2013 11:06 AM

The quote above from Clement Valla shows some of the problems with trusting too completely in a form of technology if you are not sure how it works or what its limitations are.  What does he mean when he says "Google Earth is a database disguised as a photographic representation?"  What does this have to do with the term metadata?   


Tags: cartography, visualization, mapping, art, google.

Mary Rack's curator insight, August 26, 2013 10:10 AM

This post represents a "sub-issue" which underlies many of today's  decisions: How much "information" is really a composite of items that may or may not be related? And how many of our decisions are based on those constructs? As a result, are we liviing in a "house of cards", a fantasy world that is sure to collapse around us one day? It's a scary thought. 

Gregory S Sankey Jr.'s curator insight, September 12, 2013 9:55 AM

I understand that this article mostly depicts the inherent limitations with our current technology within GIS systems but I mostly just found these images to be eerily and awkwardly beautiful. Art made accidentely. Thank-you flawed technology.

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As coast erodes, names wiped off the map

As coast erodes, names wiped off the map | ApocalypseSurvival | Scoop.it
For decades, south Louisiana residents have watched coastal landmarks disappear as erosion worsened and the Gulf of Mexico marched steadily inward.

Via Seth Dixon, ApocalypseSurvival
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Sylvain Rotillon's comment, May 9, 2013 2:57 PM
The eprverse effect of maps is that they give the false idea that our physical world is steady. It's the case as we see here for coastal environments, but also for rivers.
Ryan G Soares's curator insight, December 3, 2013 11:12 AM

I find it quite facinating how the world changes. Some of the worlds most beautiful things may not be here 30 years from now. It is quite humbling that things that man builds can be taken away by Mother Nature. As the years pass the memories made will be vanished by the environment.

Hector Alonzo's curator insight, October 14, 2014 11:40 PM

Interesting how the physical landscape of one country can be effected by the surrounding water that connects two different countries. To have some areas of Louisiana be overtaken by the Gulf of Mexico is astounding, seeing an area that has stayed relatively the same be wiped off the map is interesting

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Rich Blocks, Poor Blocks

Rich Blocks, Poor Blocks | ApocalypseSurvival | Scoop.it
Income maps of every neighborhood in the U.S. See wealth and poverty in places like New York, Los Angeles, Chicago, Philadelphia, San Francisco, Miami, and more.

Via Seth Dixon
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Alejandro Restrepo's curator insight, February 13, 2013 6:22 PM

Very interesting aspect of our demographics here in Central Falls. Any one with an interest in demographics and the make up our city should take a look a this and compare it to other neighborhoods in Rhode Island. Knowledge is power. Empower yourself!

Lauren Jacquez's curator insight, February 14, 2013 2:16 PM

Can you find your neighborhood HUGGERS?

Allison Anthony's curator insight, February 16, 2013 10:25 AM

Compare the neighborhoods in and around your area.  What trends do you see?  Any surprises?