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Massive landslides caught on camera

A complete collection of the biggest mudslides and rockslides from around the world.

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Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, October 27, 2015 7:04 PM

Unit 1 Year 7 : Study of a Geomorphic hazard 

Ruth Reynolds's curator insight, October 30, 2015 9:17 PM

Pretty scarey - be careful i f you use these in primary school - children need to feel safe. I am thinking this is good for teachers.

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Simulation of the Oso Landslide

Simulation of the Oso Landslide | ApocalypseSurvival | Scoop.it

"The large landslide that occurred in March near Oso, Washington was unusually mobile and destructive."


Via Seth Dixon, ApocalypseSurvival
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 13, 2015 1:53 PM

There are several reasons for landslides--some are purely a result of physical geography and others are related to land use patterns.  The landslide in Washington state last year was a combination of the two (see on map) and it is a good teaching moment to discuss the environmental impacts of land use patterns and resource extraction projects.  As seen in this interactive, the river was cutting at the base of the hill, while loggers were clear-cutting at the top of the mountain.  Trees help prevent erosion as the roots hold the soil in place--a critical piece to the puzzle in a very rainy climate.  With $1 million worth of timber on the slope, logging companies persisted despite objections from the Department of Natural Resources and some restrictions (but in hindsight, those restrictions clearly were not enough).  Watch a simulation of the landslide here.  

View the impact in ArcGIS online: Before and After Swipe, LiDAR I and II, and Imagery.


Questions to Consider: Other than economic worth, what other ways are there to value and evaluate the environment?  How could this landscape have been protected and managed better or was this landslide inevitable?   


Tagspolitical ecology, resources, environment, environment modify, industry, physical, geomorphology, erosion, landforms.

Kristin Mandsager San Bento's curator insight, January 27, 2015 4:50 PM

This seems like a useful tool to a degree.  But if we could actually simulate every destructive event then we would be miracle workers.  This was a sad event.  We have left such an imprint on the earth that it's starting to fight back.  We need to be more aware and careful with the one planet we have.  Climate changes are in the news more and more.  We can't ignore climate changes anymore.  

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Block-Long Sinkhole Swallows Cars in Baltimore

Block-Long Sinkhole Swallows Cars in Baltimore | ApocalypseSurvival | Scoop.it

"A block-long sinkhole opened up in a residential neighborhood in rain-soaked Baltimore on Wednesday, devouring cars and forcing the evacuation of several houses."


Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 1, 2014 4:35 PM

We like to think that the Earth beneath our feet is solid and that the configuration of the landforms in our neighborhood will be unchanging.  This a dramatic reminder that Earth's physical processes don't ever stop--even if we've built a city in that spot.  Watch this retaining wall collapse in this video.


Tags: physical, geomorphology, erosion, landformsweather and climateurban ecology.

Jim Doyle's curator insight, May 9, 2014 10:57 PM
Block-Long Sinkhole Swallows Cars in Baltimore
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Yellowstone National Park rattled by largest earthquake in 34 years

Yellowstone National Park rattled by largest earthquake in 34 years | ApocalypseSurvival | Scoop.it

"Yellowstone National Park, which sits atop one of the world's largest super-volcanoes, was struck on Sunday by a magnitude 4.8 earthquake, the biggest recorded there since February 1980, but no damage or injuries were immediately reported."


Via Seth Dixon, ApocalypseSurvival
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 31, 2014 9:10 AM

The amazing geothermal activity in Yellowstone National park annually brings thousands of tourists to the region.  The reason why these geysers, hot springs and fumaroles are there is because of the what is just below the surface.  Watch a video (the 2 minute version or a 44 minute version) to see why this natural wonder is also a major geologic threat for earthquake and volcanic activity, which explains the reasons for this weekend's earthquake.   Not to be an alarmist, but this is why some fear another major eruption soon.

CSINowedu's curator insight, March 31, 2014 9:23 AM

Yellowstone National Park, which sits atop one of the world's largest super-volcanoes, was struck on Sunday by a magnitude 4.8 earthquake, the biggest recorded there since February 1980, but no damage or injuries were immediately reported.

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Rapid Landscape Change

Rapid Landscape Change | ApocalypseSurvival | Scoop.it
BOULDER, Colo. -- National Guard helicopters were able to survey parts of Highway 34 along the Big Thompson River Saturday. Here are some images of the destruction along the roadway.

Via Seth Dixon
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Courtney Burns's curator insight, November 26, 2013 9:29 AM

Looking at these photos reminded me of the video that we watched in class where water was rushing under a road and within minutes the road started to fall apart and eventually ended up completely divided in half. It is amazing how quickly the water can erode what is underneath and cause such damage to the road and area around it. Looking through the pictures it almost makes you nervous to drive on such a rode again because it all happens so quickly. It goes to show you just how powerful that water is to cause destruction like that. It is not easy to destroy a road like that. Again it goes back to the goegraphy. This type of thing doesn't just happen everywhere. Having a river like this presents the possibilities of something like this happening. Once is starts eroding it happens quick. A road that may look driveable one minute may be completely eroded 5 minutes later. It is amazing how a rush of water can cause such damage. Even if there are set systems to get the water through, sometimes the water rush is too powerful and breaks through and erodes the earth underneath anyway like we saw in the video in class. I have never seen anything like these picture before, and it really is amazing to see what can happen. 

Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 12, 2013 12:59 PM

By looking at these pictures you can see that the water just completely ruined this road. The road sunk in and collapsed as well. Will this road ever be safe to drive on again if it gets fixed?

megan b clement's comment, December 15, 2013 11:24 PM
National helicopters caught these pictures along the Thompson river while the water rages next to a road. The destruction of the water and its erosion had deteriorated the road.
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Eyewitness video of 2011 Tsunami

"This video captures some amazing footage of the 2011 tsunami in Japan."

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Mary Rack's comment, August 17, 2013 10:28 AM
I kept wondering what happened to the people filming & watching in the next few hours. How long before they were rescued? Where did they go then? I wish there were a way to find out. Since we have the video maybe we can get some information about them.
Sally Egan's curator insight, August 19, 2013 6:46 PM

Wow... nothing yu read or study can inform like the real footage.

 

gina lockton's curator insight, August 27, 2013 6:01 AM

Biophysical Geography - check this out!

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What is a Hotspot?

1) What is a hotspot? A volcanic "hotspot" is an area in the upper mantle from which heat rises in a plume from deep in the Earth. High heat and lower pressure at the base of the mantle facilitates melting of the rock. This melt, called magma, rises through cracks to the surface and forms volcanoes. As the tectonic plate moves over the stationary hot spot, the volcanoes are rafted away and new ones form in their place.


Via Seth Dixon, ApocalypseSurvival
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Danielle Lip's curator insight, April 22, 2015 9:46 PM

While watching this video you can learn a lot about a hotspot in just 2 minutes, understanding that a hotspot is an area in the upper mantle in which heat rises and slowly begins to expand, building up pressure. The magma, which is hot rises and the cold matter sinks. the magma rises through the cracks and the plates actually carry the volcano. How did the whole idea of a volcano occur? Who knows where these volcanos are?  The hotspot can cause volcanos to erupt or even cause the volcanos to spread out, who knew a hotspot could be such a huge influence on the world, causing massive landforms and causing much tragedy.

Louis Mazza's curator insight, May 6, 2015 10:33 AM

What is a hotspot? It is a source of localized energy from the seafloor that creates volcanoes. It is not just a shallow reservoir nor a pipe filled with liquid. It is a constant stream of magma that does not move. Simple the plate move over it creating a row of multiple volcanoes, such as the Hawaiian Islands. When the magma erupts thru the surface the magma then turns to lava, and dries to rock. This process repeats until the built up lava is a volcano, still with hotspot in the middle. The plate moves and the hotspot creates a new volcano.

                This is interesting because hotspots are always changing geography, and causing map makers and teachers everywhere to learn new islands. 

Benjamin Jackson's curator insight, December 14, 2015 12:18 PM

this is a good way to discover how volcanoes are formed, and if you are trying to understand the Oceania region then this is information you need to know.

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Melting Glaciers Transform Alpine Landscape

Melting Glaciers Transform Alpine Landscape | ApocalypseSurvival | Scoop.it
Climate change is dramatically altering the Swiss Alps, where hundreds of bodies of water are being created by melting glaciers. Though the lakes can attract tourists and even generate electricity, local residents also fear catastrophic tidal waves.

Via Seth Dixon, ApocalypseSurvival
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Magnus Gustafsson's curator insight, May 8, 2013 4:45 AM

What can we do learn of this? Will send this to my students.

Lorraine Chaffer's comment, July 4, 2013 10:36 PM
Inland water - management
Lorraine Chaffer's comment, July 4, 2013 10:36 PM
Climate change impacts
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2 Cars Swallowed By Sinkhole

2 Cars Swallowed By Sinkhole | ApocalypseSurvival | Scoop.it
A 150-yard-long chunk of State Highway 89 collapsed about 5 a.m. roughly 25 miles south of Page

Via Seth Dixon
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Louis Culotta's comment, February 21, 2013 2:49 PM
it looks like some of the pictures of the roads I took after the earthquake in new Zealand .
megan b clement's comment, December 16, 2013 12:28 AM
A 150 yard piece of highway 89 had collapsed at 5 am. Two cars were traveling on the highway at the time. They have called scientists and geologists to the site where it happened so they can explain exactly what happened. The video is crazy of the road collapsed it literally dropped about six+ feet.
Jacqueline Landry's curator insight, December 17, 2013 3:14 PM

I am curious to see what the geologists reasoning for this to happen.  when I drive I assuming the roads I take are safe but this goes to show you you never know what will happen. And the news reporter said it was still going down. Glad everyone involved made it out safe. 

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Sinkholes: Can we forecast a catastrophic collapse?

Sinkholes: Can we forecast a catastrophic collapse? | ApocalypseSurvival | Scoop.it
Sometimes the ground suddenly opens, consuming cars, homes and people. We may have a way to see these sinkholes coming – so why would anyone resist the idea?

Via Seth Dixon, ApocalypseSurvival
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 20, 2015 2:08 PM

Via the American Geographical Society: "Sinkholes - formed where groundwater dissolves soluble bedrock to form underground cavities. Sometimes, when the ceiling of a cavity can no longer support the weight of the overlying sediments, it can suddenly collapse, with catastrophic results."


Tags physical, disasters, geomorphology, erosion, landforms.

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The Science of Earthquakes

The Science of Earthquakes | ApocalypseSurvival | Scoop.it
From fault types to the Ring of Fire to hydraulic fracking, the Earthquakes infographic by Weather Underground helps us understand the complexities of what shakes the ground.

 

Tags: disasters, geomorphology, physical, infographic.


Via Seth Dixon, ApocalypseSurvival
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Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, June 1, 2015 2:14 AM

Australian Curriculum

The causes, impacts and responses to a geomorphological hazard (ACHGK053)


GeoWorld 8

Chapter 4: Hazards: causes, impacts and responses

(4.5 - 4.6 Earthquakes)

Ness Crouch's curator insight, July 6, 2015 10:05 PM

Excellent infographic for showing Earthquakes :)

Jason Nemecek's curator insight, March 2, 2:00 PM

Australian Curriculum

The causes, impacts and responses to a geomorphological hazard (ACHGK053)

 

GeoWorld 8

Chapter 4: Hazards: causes, impacts and responses

(4.5 - 4.6 Earthquakes)

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Largest glacier calving ever filmed

"On May 28, 2008, Adam LeWinter and Director Jeff Orlowski filmed a historic breakup at the Ilulissat Glacier in Western Greenland. The calving event lasted for 75 minutes and the glacier retreated a full mile across a calving face three miles wide. The height of the ice is about 3,000 feet, 300-400 feet above water and the rest below water."

 

Tags: physical, geomorphology, landforms, erosion, climate change, Greenland.


Via Seth Dixon, ApocalypseSurvival
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Flaviu Fesnic's comment, April 12, 2014 3:31 PM
impressive !
Ms. Harrington's curator insight, April 13, 2014 10:37 AM

More information at www.chasingice.com

Maricarmen Husson's curator insight, April 13, 2014 2:15 PM

Adam LeWinter and Director Jeff Orlowski filmed a historic breakup at the Ilulissat Glacier in Western Greenland

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Tsunami in Japan 2011

"This video captures some amazing footage of the 2011 tsunami in Japan."


Via Seth Dixon, ApocalypseSurvival
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Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 3, 2014 7:17 PM

Most people do not realize the sheer power of a tsunami. It has the force of the entire ocean depth behind each wave. It also pours onto land for hours until it stops then pours back into the ocean for another hour or so. Most people killed are killed by objects such as cars and buildings crushing them. Seeing videos such as these can help people get a better idea of the forces actually involved and maybe save lives.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 9:33 PM

I hope something like this never happens again. Tsunamis are unreal. They are literally horrifying and to see something like this captured on camera is actually really scary. Damn plate tectonics and people living on the water front.

Lora Tortolani's curator insight, April 20, 2015 1:52 PM

So, I will never forget this morning because my brother was living in Japan at the time and I remember getting a text from him saying "we are ok."  My brother is a bit of a jokester so I figured he had something up his sleeve, however, when I woke up and heard of the destruction, I was so relieved to know he and his family were safe.  For the next month my brother flew rescue missions and brought water and food to the survivors.  He had taken hundred of pictures, and I was able to witness first hand how devastating the tsunami had been.  My heart still goes out to those people, and I am forever grateful that my brother is alive and well.

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Floods cover more than half of Philippine capital

Floods cover more than half of Philippine capital | ApocalypseSurvival | Scoop.it

"Flooding caused by some of the Philippines' heaviest rains on record submerged more than half the capital Tuesday, turning roads into rivers and trapping tens of thousands of people in homes and shelters. The government suspended all work except rescues and disaster response for a second day."

 


Via Seth Dixon, ApocalypseSurvival
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Louis Mazza's curator insight, March 26, 2015 1:24 PM

For the second day in a row, the Philippines government has been forced to shut down all work, except for rescuers and disaster responders. Flooding has submerged more than half of the cities capital, Manila. Roads have turned to rivers and tens of thousands of people are trapped in homes and shelters. 7 deaths have been recorded so far. The capital holds 12 million people and more than 200 hundred evacuation centers have been opened. The monsoon that caused the floods is expected to travel north and cause havoc throughout the provinces surrounding Manila.

Lora Tortolani's curator insight, April 20, 2015 11:03 PM

The area of Minila received more rainfall in day than it typically gets in a month.  Flights were delayed and cancelled, roads were turned into rivers.  Some of the thoughts of why this is happening are because of deforestation of mountains, clogged waterways and canals where large squatter communities live, and poor urban planning

Mark Hathaway's curator insight, November 28, 2015 6:44 AM

Flash flooding is probably the least understood natural disaster in the world. People often underestimate, how dangerous a flash flooding situation can become. The Philippines and South East Asia suffer from widespread monsoons. The regions fertile farmland is a result of the widespread heavy rainfall. A darker consequence of this phenomenon is the occurrence of dangerous flash flooding conditions. This particular rain in the Philippians was strong enough to submerge more than half of the capital underwater. The government in Manila has suspended all government operations that do not pertain to response and rescue missions. There will be major economic effects from this event. The loss of private property, and infrastructure such as roads will put a dent into the local economy.

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As coast erodes, names wiped off the map

As coast erodes, names wiped off the map | ApocalypseSurvival | Scoop.it
For decades, south Louisiana residents have watched coastal landmarks disappear as erosion worsened and the Gulf of Mexico marched steadily inward.

Via Seth Dixon, ApocalypseSurvival
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Sylvain Rotillon's comment, May 9, 2013 2:57 PM
The eprverse effect of maps is that they give the false idea that our physical world is steady. It's the case as we see here for coastal environments, but also for rivers.
Ryan G Soares's curator insight, December 3, 2013 11:12 AM

I find it quite facinating how the world changes. Some of the worlds most beautiful things may not be here 30 years from now. It is quite humbling that things that man builds can be taken away by Mother Nature. As the years pass the memories made will be vanished by the environment.

Hector Alonzo's curator insight, October 14, 2014 11:40 PM

Interesting how the physical landscape of one country can be effected by the surrounding water that connects two different countries. To have some areas of Louisiana be overtaken by the Gulf of Mexico is astounding, seeing an area that has stayed relatively the same be wiped off the map is interesting

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Erosion in Action

News 8 chief photojournalist Kevyn Fowler captured a road collapsing in Freeport, Maine during a storm.

Via Seth Dixon
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Francisco Javier 's curator insight, May 12, 2013 8:53 PM

Erosion in Action | @scoopit via @APHumanGeog http://sco.lt/...

Shelby Porter's curator insight, December 11, 2013 10:23 PM

Normally we see erosion on a piece of land over a long period of time. In this short video, we see what erosion can do to in mere minutes. It is scary to think how much the roads we drive on are eroding right underneath our cars. It is amazing how much the environment around us can change due to the weather. 

megan b clement's comment, December 16, 2013 12:30 AM
This video is crazy! It shows the erosion of a road during a storm. The water was supposed to run under the road and flow through a large pipe. As you can see after watching the video the road eventually erodes and then the pipe begins to bouy up and down. Later the road is completely deteriorated and the pipe ran down the river with the rest of the road.
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Volcanic Forces, Human Impacts


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Rogério Rocha's comment, March 28, 2013 11:30 AM
Thanks for the post.
Josue Maroquin's comment, August 12, 2013 10:12 PM
Amazing how the ash spread out over the world