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The Greatest Invention?

"What was the greatest invention of the industrial revolution? Hans Rosling makes the case for the washing machine. With newly designed graphics from Gapminder, Rosling shows us the magic that pops up when economic growth and electricity turn a boring wash day into an intellectual day of reading."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 11, 3:58 PM

What one invention has made the greatest difference in the lives of people all around the world?  The case can be made for the washing machine; it has been a major tool in transforming the lives of women and restructuring gender roles in industrialized societies. 


Tags: gapminder, poverty gendertechnology, industry, development, TED.

Kelli Jones's curator insight, October 19, 5:41 PM

I think that it is really interesting how something that almost everybody in todays society has and uses and doesn't really think about, can be described as a "miracle" to some people.

Bibhya Sharma's curator insight, October 27, 7:32 PM

unarguably one of the greatest inventions of mankind.

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Ebola easier to stop now than later

Help must come within weeks, or Ebola will require unimaginable resources. Data sources: http://nej.md/1wS4zeN & http://reliefweb.int/disaster/ep-2014-000041...

Via Seth Dixon, ApocalypseSurvival
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Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, October 6, 12:36 PM

unit 1 diffusion!

Michael Mazo's curator insight, October 6, 2:54 PM

Ebola has been a growing concern for some time now. With its origin in Africa to its spreading throughout the world, people have become increasingly worried about contracting Ebola. With the initial diagnosis of the first patient infected with Ebola in the US, the CDC has been working constantly to prevent further spread of this infectious disease. Not only has this raised medical concerns, but as soon as the Ebola outbreak has entered the United States Biotechnology stocks began to rise. With the help of devices and programs stemming from Biotechnology there is great hope for eradicating the disease once and for all. Even healthcare workers are hesitant upon working with infected individuals, so hopefully biotech will enter with a grand entrance by providing materials or machinery to help prevent these workers from getting Ebola.

Wilmine Merlain's curator insight, October 16, 11:46 AM

Although Ebola is a disease that can be stopped now, different measures need to be taken now. With the vaccines that were administered to the Ebola aid workers that were working in the site of the outbreak, mass production of that vaccine should be created and made available to those who are believed to be infected with this parasite.

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Fragile States Index

Fragile States Index | ApocalypseSurvival | Scoop.it

"Weak and failing states pose a challenge to the international community. In today’s world, with its highly globalized economy, information systems and interlaced security, pressures on one fragile state can have serious repercussions not only for that state and its people, but also for its neighbors and other states halfway across the globe.  The Fragile States Index (FSI), produced by The Fund for Peace, is a critical tool in highlighting not only the normal pressures that all states experience, but also in identifying when those pressures are pushing a state towards the brink of failure."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 27, 3:31 PM

How can political stability and security be measured?  What constitutes effective governance?  The Fragile States Index (formerly known as the Failed States Index) is a statistical ranking designed to measure the effective political institutions across the globe.  There are  12 social, economic, and political/military categories that are a part of the overall rankings and various indicators are parts of the metrics that are a part of this index are:

SOCIAL

•Demographic Pressures 

•Refugees/IDPs

•Group Grievance

•Human Flight and Brain Drain

ECONOMIC

•Uneven Economic Development

•Poverty and Economic Decline

POLITICAL/MILITARY

•State Legitimacy

•Human Rights and Rule of Law

•Public Services

•Security Apparatus

•Factionalized Elites

•External Intervention


Tags: political, statisticsdevelopment, territoriality, sovereignty, conflict, political, devolution, war.

Melissa Marshall's curator insight, August 28, 12:57 AM

How can political stability and security be measured? The Fragile States Index is a statistical ranking designed to measure the effective political institutions across the globe.

MsPerry's curator insight, September 1, 9:49 AM

APHG-Unit 4

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Poop Stories

Poop Stories | ApocalypseSurvival | Scoop.it

"From the time we’re about 6 years old, everyone loves a good poop joke, right? But is there something more meaningful lurking beneath the bathroom banter? Take a look at some international potty humor and then follow the jokes to a deeper understanding. Every laugh on this page reflects a life and death issue: the very real sanitation problems facing India today."


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Roman Mirando's curator insight, August 21, 10:21 AM

I do not want to use public bathrooms in the first place but this makes me want to not use them more. It is frightening that three children die every minute because of poor sanitation. Also, 1.5 million children die every year because of poor sanitation. These facts are so horrific and now I am going to make sure I am sanitized.

Amanda Morgan's curator insight, November 10, 4:19 PM

It is fascinating that a country so many lives are lost due to something we find simple and trivial, and really do not even think about but use on a daily basis.

Jessica Robson Postlethwaite's curator insight, November 18, 7:03 PM

World toilet day!

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Safe drinking water disappearing fast in Bangladesh

Safe drinking water disappearing fast in Bangladesh | ApocalypseSurvival | Scoop.it
Extreme weather increases salinity of water in coastal areas while excessive demand in Dhaka leaves dwindling supply

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Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 4, 2:20 PM

The entire country of Bangladesh is very close to sea level and floods frequently. Frequent flooding introduces salt and garbage into the water supplies and causes them to become unusable. Add to the fact that Dhaka is the fastest growing megacity and there just is not enough clean water to go around.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 8:25 PM

Simply put, the water in Bangladesh is unsanitary to drink. The salinity of the water is literally just unsafe to digest and something needs to be done about it. The capital is full of people that literally have no water supply and its in such high demand.

Nicole Kearsch's curator insight, November 17, 1:20 PM

This is scary, these people literally do not have water to drink and its not due to sanitation issues like it is in many other places.  With global climate change occurring the water is decreasing or turning salty in Bangladesh.  Even scarier there are people in 'hard to reach' areas that have to walk miles just to get a jug of clean water that can be used to drink.  These peoples lives especially are in great danger.  Even the underground aquifers are in trouble, with the excessive demand on them the fresh water is decreasing quickly, getting to levels where sea water can start to flow in.   This causes the salinization of the water that was previously used for drinking.  Not only is drinking water becoming a problem, but you can't water your crops with salt water, it won't work.  So now not only will these people not have any drinking water, but now they won't have any food either.  Something has to be done and very quickly.  The thought of desalination plants has come up but are also quite expensive.  Unfortunately this may be the route that has to be taken.  Pay the expense to save the people. 

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The Philippines' Geography Makes Aid Response Difficult

The Philippines' Geography Makes Aid Response Difficult | ApocalypseSurvival | Scoop.it

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Kenny Dominguez's curator insight, November 30, 2013 10:59 PM

This is a devastating time for the people of the Philippines. All they have to worry about is staying alive and being close to there family members. Help is on the way. Everyone in the world should pitch in and try to help them in anyway they can. But what I would like to find out is why this has happen when it has not before in this country. This country I have not seen in the news before this big devastation had happened. I am also curious to find out how come the help aid is taking so long to arrive when people are dying because they have no food available for them because it has been destroyed or it is trapped under all the debris from all the buildings that have collapsed because they were not structured properly. this situation is a repeat of hurricane Katrina in the united states were all the house were not hurricane proof and were built in places known for disaster.

Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, April 19, 10:37 PM

Due to the fact the Philippines is made up of over 7,000 islands, it makes aid response very difficult. When natural disasters such as typhoons occur in the Philippines it can negatively affect hundreds of islands, making it difficult to help the people on every island. It can takes days for supplies to arrive on some of the islands, and sometimes people do not even receive necessary supplies such as food and water. Countries, which are composed of numerous islands, face many challenges.  

Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 3, 7:09 PM

Fortunately, the Philippines has a relatively stable infrastructure so even though lots of areas were hit, the human fatalities and issues are not as bad as they could have been. Unfortunately, these are many islands and getting from one to the next is very difficult when all communications and landing areas are compromised.

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What Pollution? Hong Kong Tourists Pose With Fake Skyline

What Pollution? Hong Kong Tourists Pose With Fake Skyline | ApocalypseSurvival | Scoop.it
Picture this: Tourists visiting one of your city's most prominent attractions are unable to see it because of smog, haze and a bevy of other airborne pollutants. What's the solution?

Via Seth Dixon, ApocalypseSurvival
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Nicole Kearsch's curator insight, November 24, 11:10 PM

This is beyond absurd.  Put up a picture of what the landscape should look like so people can take pictures instead of dealing with the real problem at hand.  There seems to be a problem with that idea right there.  I understand that a tourist wants to take pictures and document their trip and in some cases may not be able to take a picture of the landscape because it is so covered in pollution to see, but that is a reason to fix the pollution problem not set up a fake picture.  The pollution in China is doing more harm than making it difficult for a tourist to take pictures but it is harming the people that live there.  The amount of very dangerous days that they have that toxic chemicals and the like are in the air is ridiculous.  This is the air that people are breathing in.  It should be more of a concern to leaders that the people that live in China are potentially facing very serious health problems because of the pollution than it seems to be.  Constructing a wall with a fake skyline does not fix any actual problem.  Yes now they can get a decent picture of their trip, but everyone is still suffering the consequences from real problem.

Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 17, 5:17 PM

This article covers both a somewhat humorous occurrence which has a really tragic side to it. In Hong Kong these murals  are erected so that both natives as well as tourists are able to take nice pictures, which they are normally unable to because of the horrible smog hanging over the city. It seems like this like treating the symptoms and not the actual disease. Instead of attempting to clean the air making it possible to people to take real pictures (and breath easier) they'd rather just put up fake pictures making photos easier. While this approach is definitely easier I fell the alternative is a far wiser course of action. 

Wilmine Merlain's curator insight, December 17, 10:43 PM

Before the solution in Hong Kong can actually change, I believe that the government must first take into consideration the ways in which their mass production and their lack for environmental regulation has brought them this far into such a high level of carbon into the air. What might come off to some as a cloudy day in Hong Kong is actually the everyday appearance of their environment. These high levels of carbon into the atmosphere can have long lasting effects on the lives of the people and future generation if this problem isn't properly cared for. 

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In Kenya, Using Tech To Put An 'Invisible' Slum On The Map

In Kenya, Using Tech To Put An 'Invisible' Slum On The Map | ApocalypseSurvival | Scoop.it
A billion people worldwide live in slums, largely invisible to city services and governments — but not to satellites.

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John Blunnie's curator insight, July 28, 2013 1:11 PM

Great how tech and globalization can help represed people in other countries.

Meagan Harpin's curator insight, October 6, 2013 5:07 PM

The slum-mapping movement began in India almost a decade ago and migrated to africa, the idea of this is to make slums a reality to people who have never set foot in one before. The maps can be used in court to stop evictions or simply to raise awarance. I think this idea is on the right track of what needs to be done. These people need help and so many people incuding the governement pretend they arent their but with these maps as proof they can no longer do that.    

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, March 19, 10:24 AM

Slums and squatter settlements are a problem that a lot of the developing world has to deal with.  The unsafe and unsanitary buildings cause headaches and problems for the leaders of the cities they surround.  This story is hopeful in that the city did manage to bring a water line out to get clean water to the people living in this area.  Perhaps this will lead to a better quality of life of the inhabitants of this particular slum.  Also the project of mapping such areas can be a useful tool for city planners to better regulate these areas and help the people that live there.,

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Water and Development

Australia's engagement with Asia: Water - a case study on Flores

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Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, April 16, 5:23 PM

In Indonesia, many areas lack clean water. This makes it hard to keep residents healthy. World Vision Australia works with Indonesian towns to set up pipelines to the clean water sources to transport it to the areas of dirty water. This helps the villages work together and benefit off having clean water to drink and uncontaminated food. This improves life in Indonesia and they are very thankful for it.

Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, April 18, 8:38 PM

The children of this village were once sick and could not regularly wash their hands due to the fact water was hard to find, and if it was found the quality was poor. World Vision helped by building a pipeline, which brings clean drinking water to this village. They can now bathe regularly and drink clean water.

Having this clean water also benefits the community from an economic standpoint. The abundance of clean water now attracts educators to their village and it also helps with creation of bricks. These bricks can be sold and can be used for their home improvement projects. 

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, April 24, 2:29 PM

This video shows a positive side to globalization.  The Australian organization that worked with the people in these rural villages to get them access to clean water.  The quality of life when up hugely when the people could access water in their homes.  The hours needed to trek to the wells was eliminated and the water have created jobs and better quality of life for the villages.

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The Rights and Wrongs of Slum Tourism

The Rights and Wrongs of Slum Tourism | ApocalypseSurvival | Scoop.it
Researchers are heading to Dharavi, Mumbai, to study the impact of slum tours on the residents.

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Ana Cristina Gil's curator insight, November 6, 2013 8:36 PM

I don’t find nothing right about tourist visiting the slum, I feel that the tourist are violating there privacy. They are human being not some historical landmark. If the tourist are not helping this people why are they going? If you are going to visit this places do it because you want to help them, not because you think is interesting their way of living.

Cam E's curator insight, April 1, 11:57 AM

Moral questions are always fun. Personally I don't think going to see slums is all that exploitative in itself, but I would make a distinction between guided tours that cost money, and self-directed tours though. In a guided tour you are paying money to walk through a community and view what life is like for those people, but in a self-directed tour you are just another person walking down the streets and viewing whatever you stumble upon. There are plenty of tours within neighborhoods of different economic value the world over, but these tours are scrutinized because the people touring are as wealthy, or less wealthy, than the people living there. I don't think that a poor community changes this dynamic in an immoral way, as the perceptions of which group is superior come from the own minds of those who feel uncomfortable with it.

 

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, April 10, 9:41 AM

This article rises in interesting question.  Are tours of slums exploitive or beneficial to the slum dwellers?  On the one hand the tours could feel like exploitation and the tourist is viewing attractions at a “zoo”, on the other hand it brings people far removed from slum life in contact with it and can change people’s point of view on the slums.  It can be beneficial if the tour guides donate money to the slums or jobs are sought by slum dwellers to become tour guides.  The question is should slums be hidden away from view or opened up to tourists so that they can see the hardships first hand.  I think that this is an issue that is not clearly black or white; there are many shades of gray involved in this issue.

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Japan's Geographic Challenge

Stratfor examines Japan's primary geographic challenge of sustaining its large population with little arable land and few natural resources. For more analysi...

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Kevin Cournoyer's comment, May 1, 2013 12:51 AM
Unlike other larger, more geographically diverse countries, Japan is faced with the problem of a general lack of farmable land and natural resources. The fact that the country is itself an island does not make things any easier for it in an economic sense. The way the country is divided up also makes for a difficult political situation, as mountain ranges create division, and therefore, political disunity.
The proximity of the Korean peninsula and China to Japan is also important to examine. Whenever Japan wishes to acquire natural resources and other economically beneficial materials, Korea is the conduit through which Japan tends to invade the mainland, usually China. Because of this, we can see how Japan’s geographic location may cause strained relationships with its neighbors, both politically and economically. Alienating two of its closest neighbors would clearly be a disastrous move for Japan, but it may be seen as necessary due to its unfortunate geographic location.
Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, November 27, 2013 5:31 PM

It would make sense to me that for a place like Japan to sustain itself successfully, it would have to have some help from other areas with more resources.  Again with the concept- people don't choose to be born, or where they are born... To be born in Japan is as unchosen by that person as it would be in any other country.  I don't think people should have to pay for resources that they do not have available, especially because they are on an island/island chain that simply doesn't have what they need.  I am really repulsed by the bartering system because of absolute indication of beyond excessive surplus and profit and greed and all that garbage that humanity reeks of.  Yeah some people are happy, but we could be completely unburdened of all negativity if we banded together to rid the world of negativity itself.  I know that Japan would be happy to receive everything that they need for no cost, but I also know that many people would be willing to work, and more willing to work, if they didn't have expenses to pay for... it would really be serving their life's purpose as a component of humankind if they worked to help others, rather than to pay their monthly rent.  I don't have a clue how I would go about organizing a movement to transform this idea into a reality, but I'll work on that.  In the mean time, I would advise supranationalism for Japan, and hope that with the alliance of other countries, they can band together and make deals that work for the greater good of their country, population, and the world.

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, April 10, 10:58 AM

This short video did a great job in explaining why Japan became expansionist in the decades leading up to WW II.  The mountainous nature of the islands and lack of arable land challenges Japan to provide food for its people.  To understand Japan you must understand her geography, this helps to understand why a country acted the way it did in the past and can be a predictor of future actions. 

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What the Internet Looks Like

What the Internet Looks Like | ApocalypseSurvival | Scoop.it
You are looking at, more or less, a portrait of the internet over an average 24 hours in 2012—higher usage in yellows and reds; lower in greens and blues—created by an anonymous researcher for the "Internet Census 2012" project.

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Zakary Pereira's comment, April 30, 2013 5:02 PM
Whoa. This is awesome. Never before had I seen internet usage across the globe before. I wasn’t too surprised by the map its showing. Obviously the United States and Europe would have the highest internet traffic of the world although I was quite surprised to see such massive internet activity in Central America, near Panama and Costa Rica. This data was collected illegally and it was interesting how they did it. It was a bot who hacked into Linux computers with no password (really…) or a default password (still really…) and then tracked their IPv4 address to see their activity. It was a non-threatening bot and they created a readme file on each computer that explained what it was doing however it was still an invasion of privacy and no matter how cool the map came out I cannot agree with their methods of obtaining this information. What interested me at first about this was activity in the Middle East. You can see a lot of activity in Turkey and around the Nile in Egypt, but other than that the rest of the region is fairly dim. It is unfortunate that is so because of how it could help people there, just look at the Arab Spring.
Kevin Cournoyer's comment, May 1, 2013 12:51 AM
I found this collection of data very interesting. It reveals a number of different things about the internet across the world and the intensity of its usage.
Most obviously, perhaps, you can see what areas of the world have the most internet usage, or at least access. The areas of highest use seem to certainly match up with what you would expect: high internet usage and access in first world countries in Europe and in the United States, lower internet usage and access in more impoverished areas such as Africa and the Middle East. The amount of internet usage can also be seen increasing and decreasing as the animation moves from right to left, indicating the twenty four hour cycle of a day and presumably decreased internet usage during the night and increased usage during the day. This animation provides fascinating and valuable information about the internet in a unique geographic context. Economic geography is apparent in the concentration of internet usage, while physical geography is evident in the correlation between what parts of the world are accessing the internet at higher rates and when, in contrast to other parts of the world.
Thomas D's comment, May 2, 2013 11:32 AM
I find that this article of Internet usage is very interesting and somewhat helpful in understanding the development of countries. You can see from this that over a 24 hour period of time that the entire United States is lit up with a color. When over this 24 hour period there are places on the map that never once do you see a light or you only can see it for a small period of time. I think this goes to show how greatly our society depends on the Internet nowadays. That we basically use the internet or a computer for just about everything at all times of the day. That in some countries they are so underdeveloped that they barely have access to computers. According to this picture Africa is barely lit up and it’s mostly lit up in South Africa which is one of the growing countries in the world. I think this information although gathered illegally is very interesting to look at and see who uses the internet the most.
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A New Way to Illuminate Inequality Around the World

A New Way to Illuminate Inequality Around the World | ApocalypseSurvival | Scoop.it

Want to know where the poor live? Look at where the light isn’t.

 

"Satellite photos of Earth’s artificial lights at night form a luminescent landscape. But researcher Chris Elvidge of NOAA and colleagues from the University of Colorado and the University of Denver realized that they could also illuminate something much darker: the magnitude of human poverty. By comparing the amount of light in a particular area and its known population, they realized that they could infer the percentage of people who are able to afford electricity and the level of government spending on infrastructure development. This allowed them to extrapolate levels of human development—a measure of well-being that includes such factors as income, life expectancy and literacy."


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How Ebola sped out of control

How Ebola sped out of control | ApocalypseSurvival | Scoop.it
The story behind the failure of the world's health organizations to stop the Ebola disaster.

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Bibhya Sharma's curator insight, October 7, 1:32 AM

is enough commitment shown by the developed countries, I dont think so.

Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, October 7, 4:24 AM

How Ebola sped out of control

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, October 7, 9:53 AM

unit 1

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Why this Ebola outbreak became the worst we've ever seen

"The 2014 Ebola outbreak in West Africa has killed more people than sum total of all the previous outbreaks since the virus was first identified in 1976. This video explains how it got so bad."  


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Brittany Ortiz's curator insight, October 6, 3:08 PM

It is very sad watching knowing how it took to so long to get Ebola out to the public and make it known of the very spreadable virus. It’s obvious how since the US can be at risk of getting the virus in our country they now want to make it very known and for people to be cautious of the idea that Ebola can eventually be in the US and spread. We should have been cautious of the virus many years ago, but the rate of the virus spreading, sky rocketed just this year. It’s obvious why it took so many years for the Ebola virus to be known, since it was just known for it to have been in a particular Sierra Leon and Liberia. Since it has spread from there to the border of Guinea and now potentially going to different parts of the world there is no question why there is a health scare in many countries.

John Nieuwendyk's curator insight, October 28, 10:20 PM

In just a few months the Ebola virus has cumulated out of control. More people became affected and died in the last five months than all of the combined deaths that have occurred since Ebola was first discovered in 1976. Ebola began to spread from rural areas to a border region in West Africa when ill people traveled to the city to work or go to the market, making international spread likely. Mounting a campaign to increase awareness of the risks and to contain the virus was nearly impossible due to the low illiteracy rates. Consequently, health workers were taking ill people away from family and their homes to contaminate centers. This caused much fear and mistrust and was not successful. More people became infected and the snowball effect ensued. When people did show up at ill-equipped hospitals, there were not enough beds or free space and most were turned away. Some health workers walked off the job fearing being infected because of the poor conditions. No gloves, masks or gowns were provided and workers feared for their own health. The ill patients went back into the community and Ebola continued to spread. The response of the global community was not fast enough, and help did not arrive in time before the spread of Ebola became an epidemic. It is clear that in a world that is so closely connected, we must have a global heath system that works.  

Giselle Figueroa's curator insight, November 4, 5:32 PM

Ebola is getting worst every day. one of the things that has caused the spread of this virus is the fact that many working people cross the border to other regions to work or to go to market. Back in days, you used to see this Ebola issue in very rural areas, but now is getting worst. In these areas were the Ebola is getting worst, they do not count with a good health system. Sometimes there are day when they do not have gloves, gowns and mask, and because of that, there have been health care workers who have just walked away from their jobs because they do not want to put in risk their life. This  is a very sad situation, which I hope it get better.

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What You Need to Know About the Ebola Outbreak

What You Need to Know About the Ebola Outbreak | ApocalypseSurvival | Scoop.it
Questions and answers on the scale of the outbreak and the science of the Ebola virus.

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Alec Castagno's curator insight, October 6, 3:07 PM

A good resource that gives a general outline of the recent Ebola outbreak and its effects on the world. The outbreak comes from a border region with a very weak infrastructure and poor population, which has allowed for Ebola to spread like wildfire. The poor economic state of the area has let Ebola wreak havoc, and the modern level of globalization has allowed for the virus to spread out into the world. We see how Ebola has developed and spread throughout Western Africa, and when compared to American outbreak situation it highlights the deep differences in the capabilities of core and periphery countries.

Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, October 6, 3:11 PM

It's almost ironic that the Western World has chosen to wait so long to get involved and now because of it's spread fear has begun that Ebola might travel to the United States. By not sending aid in a timely fashion the US has allowed the virus to grow to a point that now the US finds itself in danger. To make a historical comparison it's almost akin to the Munich Agreements, France and England chose not to stop a growing and dangerous Germany out of fear of conflict only to find war on their door steps because of it. Why did the western world wait so long? Euro-centric bias or racism? Short sightedness? Regardless of the reason the United States and Western Europe are at risk from a nearly untreatable disease primarily through negligence.

 

Hector Alonzo's curator insight, October 6, 3:23 PM

This article shows how the Ebola virus began to spread in many of the countries on Africa and how likely the virus will arrive in the United States. The virus has crossed many borders in Africa already and, according to the article, has infected five people in the United States, but has been quarantined and is currently being treated.  The Ebola virus outbreak has shown how ill equipped certain parts of the world are, in terms of, having the necessary tools for combating a deadly disease. For example, the article provides a map that shows the areas in Africa are more infected with Ebola than others, illustrating how certain parts of the country are becoming more susceptible to the outbreak than others. So geographically, the Ebola virus has gone from a regional outbreak into a potentially global epidemic, what with the cases in the United States.

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The Deadliest Animal in the World

The Deadliest Animal in the World | ApocalypseSurvival | Scoop.it
Bill Gates introduces Mosquito Week on his personal blog, the Gates Notes. Everything posted this week is dedicated to this deadly creature. Mosquitoes carry devastating diseases like malaria, dengue fever, yellow fever, and encephalitis.

Via Seth Dixon, ApocalypseSurvival
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Jacques Lebègue's curator insight, May 2, 3:13 AM

"C'est pas la p'tite bête qui manger la grosse". La manger, je ne sais pas, être le vecteur de son décès, c'est plus probable. Les moustiques et le paludisme tuent plus de personnes en 4min que les requins en un an!
On pourrait aussi drastiquement réduire le nombre de décès humains en désormais tous ces humains dotés d'une arme...

16s3d's curator insight, May 2, 3:51 AM

"C'est pas la p'tite bête qui manger la grosse". La manger, je ne sais pas, être le vecteur de son décès, c'est plus probable. Les moustiques et le paludisme tuent plus de personnes en 4min que les requins en un an!
On pourrait aussi drastiquement réduire le nombre de décès humains en désormais tous ces humains dotés d'une arme...

Fathie Kundie's curator insight, May 5, 11:08 AM

ما هو المخلوق الأشد فتكا في العالم؟

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DON’T PANIC — The Facts About Population

DON’T PANIC — The Facts About Population | ApocalypseSurvival | Scoop.it

Don’t Panic – is a one-hour long documentary broadcasted on BBC on the 7th of November 2013.

The visualizations are based on original graphics and stories by Gapminder and the underlaying data-sources are listed here.
Hans’s — “All time favorite graph”, is an animating bubble chart linking health and wealth which you can interact with online here and download offline here.


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Mackenzie Mcneal :)'s curator insight, August 27, 10:04 AM

Maybe the world  being overpopulated is a good thing. In the video it explains how all of our resources wont run out they will just need to be increased. The way we live and what we live off of is much different than what other people have to live off of.  We have all of these resources to spare that as people bring more children into this world we will have plenty to share. The world is a place to  farm,  to be able to provide for your families,  to live your everyday life without having to worry about dying from diseases. So if the world becomes overpopulated it will force people to move to a better inhabitant.

Katelyn Sesny's curator insight, October 31, 12:24 PM

Although this is a very long video, it provides extremely important facts about the explosion of population growth, the history and background behind it all, countries and states at risk, already occurring issues and possible solutions to these rising problems. - UNIT 2

MissPatel's curator insight, December 16, 3:21 AM

Most of you have watched this - have a quick recap. Can you use this in any of your answers to exam questions? 

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Yardstick of Wealth

"In the last of a series of programmes exploring global population for the award-winning This World strand, Rosling presents an 'as live' studio event featuring cutting-edge 3D infographics painting a vivid picture of a world that has changed in ways we barely understand – often for the better."


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Kibet Koskei's curator insight, November 2, 2013 4:19 AM

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Get Paid To Enlighten African Youth On How To Use The Internet To Grow Rich ! Re: Ref:Jobs Are Moving Online, Lets Us Help You Acquire The Skills Of 21st Century and Help You To Be A head Of the Masses in Getting Online Jobs!
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Sue Bicknell's curator insight, November 4, 2013 7:37 AM

Another fantastic presentation by Rosling

Rola Fahs's curator insight, November 13, 2013 10:27 AM

Rosling does a great job speaking of poverty and population. This would be an awesome text to use in a unit about poverty. This can be incorporated in a history class, economics class, sociology class, even an anthropology class if it is offered in highschools. 

It is a perfect length video that can be used to introduce a writing assignment, a research project, or an in class group assignment. But it also shows the extremety of poor vs. rich. From what I have seen students like to state their opinions about issues like this. Teachers may have to watch out how they introduce this into their topic or discussion, but it is a worthwhile source to use. 

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AIDS, TB and Malaria in Africa

AIDS, TB and Malaria in Africa | ApocalypseSurvival | Scoop.it
Despite the gains, more Africans still die from Malaria even as the spotlight remains firmly fixed on HIV/AIDS.

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Nathan Chasse's curator insight, April 1, 10:41 AM

This infographic shows how pervasive disease is in Africa. Though HIV gets a lot of attention, malaria and tuberculosis are just as prevalent as HIV/AIDS. The attention given to HIV/AIDS is reflected in the amount of aid sent to Africa, with a significant amount more being spent to halt the spread of HIV. These efforts are not entirely in vain as there have been decreases for all three diseases, but the funding necessary to make serious progress not on its way.

 

Though there is an even greater need to fight malaria, more international aid for HIV/AIDS is likely because most of the countries sending aid are not as familiar with malaria and HIV/AIDS has become sensationalized.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 3:52 PM

Disease is a global problem. Not having enough resources to keep diseases such as malaria out of Africa is unfortunate. People are dying every day and in efforts to save these people, it still can't be done. In the past, AIDS was the main disease that killed people in Africa. More recently, malaria is working its way through humans and killing them more than AIDS.

TavistockCollegeGeog's curator insight, July 4, 7:41 AM

Fantastic infographic on health risks in Africa. Particular focus on infectious diseases.

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Beijing's Pollution

Beijing's Pollution | ApocalypseSurvival | Scoop.it

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Jacob Crowell's curator insight, November 24, 2:21 PM

Great picture to show the two sectors of China's society. In Beijing we see the combination of industry and post industrialized. 

Nicole Kearsch's curator insight, November 24, 11:40 PM

This picture taken by a photographer with the perfect lighting is brilliant....that is, if you're into deceiving people that the pollution from these power plants stays away from the higher class businesses and residences.  Looking at this picture you see the smoke coming from the power plant in China far in the distance creating a yellowish hue that could be thought to be from the sun.  Then closer in the scene we see what appears to be businesses and potentially some peoples homes.  This area is in a totally different color from the yellow we see to be associated with the pollution from the power plant.  Here we see a blue, commonly associated with clean water, covering the entirety of this area.  With the difference in colors these places seem to be as different as possible from each other.  In reality though, smog doesn't just stay in one area of the city where it is produced, but spreads throughout the entirety of a city.  There are no restraints on where the pollution can and can't be, it is free flowing into communities where people work and live.  If you're trying to sell a house here this picture wouldn't be a bad idea to use, although most natives aren't oblivious to what is really going on.

Hector Alonzo's curator insight, December 15, 8:00 PM

This picture is interesting to say the least, it depicts two different cities, even though it is the same city. the picture does a good job at showing the major problem that pollution is causing to Beijing. While showing a smog surrounded city behind a clean, yet clouded looking city, drives this point of pollution home and raises the question is putting large factories and toxic fumes in the air, more important than the well being of your citizens?

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Is It Crazy to Think We Can Eradicate Poverty?

Is It Crazy to Think We Can Eradicate Poverty? | ApocalypseSurvival | Scoop.it
The end to extreme poverty might very well be within reach. But is the bar too low?

 

The World Bank aims to raise just about everyone on Earth above the $1.25-a-day income threshold. In Zambia, an average person living in such dire poverty might be able to afford, on a given day, two or three plates of cornmeal porridge, a tomato, a mango, a spoonful each of oil and sugar, a bit of chicken or fish, maybe a handful of nuts. But he would have just pocket change to spend on transportation, housing, education and everything else.


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Hannah Campbell's curator insight, July 20, 2013 10:29 PM

I do not think it is crazy to think we can eridacte poverty, but the world's richest and most developed countries need to support the developing countries. 

JH Tan's curator insight, January 19, 7:52 AM

It is extremely hard to eradicate poverty in the world as most people in the world is still living below the $1.25 a day income.However, if  gorverments from developed countries are willing to support the developing countries,I believe we will be able to hit the target set by the world bank to raise just about everyone on earth above the $1.25 a day income.

ROGC's curator insight, August 5, 9:14 PM

poverty is just so sad......

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What the world eats -- a week's worth of groceries

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Jen-ai's curator insight, May 1, 2013 10:03 AM

!  This is so informative.  

Laurie Diamond's curator insight, May 3, 2013 9:03 AM

An interesting look and different cultures

Samuel Yeats's curator insight, May 8, 2013 12:40 AM

Q1) How does this slideshow depict the differing socioeconomic situations of countries around the world? (Use the example of at least 2 countries)

Q2) Do you think that the image of an Australian weekly diet is accurate to your own family and why?

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My escape from North Korea

"As a child growing up in North Korea, Hyeonseo Lee thought her country was 'the best on the planet.' It wasn't until the famine of the 90s that she began to to wonder. She escaped the country at 14, to begin a life in hiding, as a refugee in China. Hers is a harrowing, personal tale of survival and hope."


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윤지현's curator insight, November 6, 6:59 PM

I have ever met a person who escaped from North Korea. Her story was like a very scary movie. If I become a teacher in the future, I will do my best to a student from North Korea.

서병기's curator insight, November 6, 7:00 PM

Because of the tragedies of history, there are still scattered family both in South and North Korea. Please hope for the unification of the Korean Peninsula.

Julia Kang's curator insight, November 6, 8:45 PM

So many North Koreans are suffering from poverty. They do not have any food and we should pay more attention to them. This video was quite interesting!

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Photos of Children From Around the World With Their Most Prized Possessions

Photos of Children From Around the World With Their Most Prized Possessions | ApocalypseSurvival | Scoop.it
Chiwa - Mchinji, Malawi Shot over a period of 18 months, Italian photographer Gabriele Galimberti's project Toy Stories compiles photos of children from around the world with their prized possesions—their toys.

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John Slifko's curator insight, March 23, 2013 1:53 AM

geography and history were two of Dewey's most important tools in pedagogy in strengthening the imagination of the child 

Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, November 27, 2013 6:40 PM

This is horrifying and really puts things in perspective.  Their toys are not what they need.  None of these kids had anything creative except for the building blocks... I would have liked to have seen some paints and paintings, because I hugely believe that schools suck the creativity out of people's lives.  Toys can be... 'imaginative,' but not really.  Toys get put away when a kid turns 10.  Then they're in school.  Then they're at work... it was interesting to see the farmer girl with farm toys, but seriously, again, creativity should be encouraged at that age.  If people are not creative, they become creatures that absorb the habits and things that they are taught, with no ability to deal with new situations, or adapt their environment in a positive manner to better suit themselves or others.  I hate the stagnancy of the world today.  I used to play guitar in Providence on the streets, I have publically painted at URI, I have given paintings away to friends, and I love sharing ART, which can change the world, if only by one mind at a time.  I believe in the butterfly effect and that these kids should have something artsy as their most prized possession, because to not have that is to reflect the corporate importance in society on buying manufactured goods.  As for the kid with toy guns, it really isn't my business to speak ill of him, but seriously! He will end up with a TV show like Duck Dynasty one day or something... hope it works out for him.

Lauren Sellers's curator insight, May 20, 12:01 PM

This shows us how kids from different regions in the world value certain items that to others may seem almost trivial. Around the world everything is seen differently because situations are different.