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Flooding Risk From Climate Change, Country by Country

Flooding Risk From Climate Change, Country by Country | ApocalypseSurvival | Scoop.it
A new analysis of sea levels and flood risk around the world offers more evidence that the brunt of climate change will not be borne equally.

 

More than a quarter of Vietnam’s residents live in areas likely to be subject to regular floods by the end of the century.  Globally, eight of the 10 large countries most at risk are in Asia.  These figures are the result of a new analysis of sea levels and flood risk around the world, conducted by Climate Central and based on more detailed sea-level data than has previously been available.  The analysis offers more evidence that the countries emitting the most carbon aren’t necessarily the ones that will bear the brunt of climate change.  

 

Tags: Southeast Asia, water, disasters, urban ecology, coastal, climate change. 


Via Seth Dixon, ApocalypseSurvival
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Edelin Espino's curator insight, December 15, 2014 5:14 PM

In this article the author discusses the risk of flooding in many different locations of the world. He claims about 2.6 percent of the world's populations. That's a big percentage considering all the people of the planet. 

Danielle Lip's curator insight, April 14, 2015 12:10 PM

Flooding is a major risk when it comes to the world we live in especially for Southeast Asia, some areas will be below sea level which shows how the the climate changes are affecting the flood risks caused by global carbon emission. A study from this article shows that eight our of ten of the largest countries will be at the risk of being flooded and below sea level. The major question is how can this carbon emissions be lower? If the carbon is lower then the sea level will rise and less countries will be at risk, this is mainly focusing on Southeast Asia. Yes, we can not change the climate changes but by keeping the land clean and taking care of the environment the flood risk and sea level change could get out of risk level. 

If the weather continues at the rate it is at then about 2.6 percent of the global population which is approximately 177 million people will be living in a place at risk of regular flooding. Flooding can cause a lot of damage to homes, crops and people physically because flooding is not just a little amount of water.

The largest country at risk with people in danger from the map is China, I liked the way this map worked because you can see from the boxes how many people are going to be affected by the flooding. Instead of just having numbers, giving a better visual for people with the boxes and their sizes.

Lora Tortolani's curator insight, April 20, 2015 9:24 PM

It's like watching the land on Earth change right in front of our eyes.  According to this map, if global carbon emissions stay as they currently are and sea levels can be affected about as much as expected, 2.6 million people of the global population will live in a high risk flood zone; this wipes out 177 million people!  

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Water and Development

Australia's engagement with Asia: Water - a case study on Flores

Via Seth Dixon
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Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, April 18, 2014 8:38 PM

The children of this village were once sick and could not regularly wash their hands due to the fact water was hard to find, and if it was found the quality was poor. World Vision helped by building a pipeline, which brings clean drinking water to this village. They can now bathe regularly and drink clean water.

Having this clean water also benefits the community from an economic standpoint. The abundance of clean water now attracts educators to their village and it also helps with creation of bricks. These bricks can be sold and can be used for their home improvement projects. 

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, April 24, 2014 2:29 PM

This video shows a positive side to globalization.  The Australian organization that worked with the people in these rural villages to get them access to clean water.  The quality of life when up hugely when the people could access water in their homes.  The hours needed to trek to the wells was eliminated and the water have created jobs and better quality of life for the villages.

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 14, 2015 9:48 PM

This is a pretty sad short documentary, it tells of the diseases and the amount of people that go without water. Just to get water women will have to go to a well and walk a couple hours through a forest. Sometimes the well can be dry. The women and children are affected greatly. The women have neck and knee pain from the weight of the water they are carrying and the children are always sick from the poor drinking water so they are constantly missing school.  With permission, the people of the villages were able to engineer a freshwater system that ran through the different villages, a total of 27 kilometers. This made life significantly better than what it used to be. The one thing that really surprised me is that the villagers opted out to pay $120 a year to neighboring villages to keep the water clean and allow them use. 

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Floods cover more than half of Philippine capital

Floods cover more than half of Philippine capital | ApocalypseSurvival | Scoop.it

"Flooding caused by some of the Philippines' heaviest rains on record submerged more than half the capital Tuesday, turning roads into rivers and trapping tens of thousands of people in homes and shelters. The government suspended all work except rescues and disaster response for a second day."

 


Via Seth Dixon, ApocalypseSurvival
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Louis Mazza's curator insight, March 26, 2015 1:24 PM

For the second day in a row, the Philippines government has been forced to shut down all work, except for rescuers and disaster responders. Flooding has submerged more than half of the cities capital, Manila. Roads have turned to rivers and tens of thousands of people are trapped in homes and shelters. 7 deaths have been recorded so far. The capital holds 12 million people and more than 200 hundred evacuation centers have been opened. The monsoon that caused the floods is expected to travel north and cause havoc throughout the provinces surrounding Manila.

Lora Tortolani's curator insight, April 20, 2015 11:03 PM

The area of Minila received more rainfall in day than it typically gets in a month.  Flights were delayed and cancelled, roads were turned into rivers.  Some of the thoughts of why this is happening are because of deforestation of mountains, clogged waterways and canals where large squatter communities live, and poor urban planning

Mark Hathaway's curator insight, November 28, 2015 6:44 AM

Flash flooding is probably the least understood natural disaster in the world. People often underestimate, how dangerous a flash flooding situation can become. The Philippines and South East Asia suffer from widespread monsoons. The regions fertile farmland is a result of the widespread heavy rainfall. A darker consequence of this phenomenon is the occurrence of dangerous flash flooding conditions. This particular rain in the Philippians was strong enough to submerge more than half of the capital underwater. The government in Manila has suspended all government operations that do not pertain to response and rescue missions. There will be major economic effects from this event. The loss of private property, and infrastructure such as roads will put a dent into the local economy.