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India heatwave kills 800 as capital's roads melt

India heatwave kills 800 as capital's roads melt | ApocalypseSurvival | Scoop.it

"At least 800 people have died in a major heatwave that has swept across India, melting roads in New Delhi as temperatures neared 50 degrees Celsius (122 Fahrenheit).  Hospitals are on alert to treat victims of heatstroke and authorities advised people to stay indoors with no end in sight to the searing conditions.  In the worst-hit state of Andhra Pradesh, in the south, 551 people have died in the past week as temperatures hit 47 degrees Celsius on Monday." 

 

Tags: physical, weather and climate, India, South Asia.


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 27, 8:51 AM

This article on MSN and this NPR podcast remind me about how extremes can create chaos.  While in Texas, the flooding has ravaged much of the state.  Weather from other places is never news unless it is so extreme that it becomes a crisis.   

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Poop Stories

Poop Stories | ApocalypseSurvival | Scoop.it

"From the time we’re about 6 years old, everyone loves a good poop joke, right? But is there something more meaningful lurking beneath the bathroom banter? Take a look at some international potty humor and then follow the jokes to a deeper understanding. Every laugh on this page reflects a life and death issue: the very real sanitation problems facing India today."


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Roman M's curator insight, August 21, 2014 10:21 AM

I do not want to use public bathrooms in the first place but this makes me want to not use them more. It is frightening that three children die every minute because of poor sanitation. Also, 1.5 million children die every year because of poor sanitation. These facts are so horrific and now I am going to make sure I am sanitized.

Amanda Morgan's curator insight, November 10, 2014 4:19 PM

It is fascinating that a country so many lives are lost due to something we find simple and trivial, and really do not even think about but use on a daily basis.

Jessica Robson Postlethwaite's curator insight, November 18, 2014 7:03 PM

World toilet day!

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Assessing the Validity of Online Sources

Assessing the Validity of Online Sources | ApocalypseSurvival | Scoop.it

This is a fabulous map---but is the statement true?

 


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Melissa Marie Falco-Dargitz's curator insight, November 23, 2014 10:15 AM

The statement is true. When the populations of the countries highlighted are combined, 51% of the world’s population lives in the circle. But, this is a claim that could be easily just put out there. We have to look at where the information comes from. In this day and age, it is easy to manipulate numbers, images and ideas. The media has become spin masters.

Jason Schneider's curator insight, April 2, 9:40 PM

This is a debatable map but I agree that there are more people living in the southeast area of Asia than people living outside of it. However, I also believe that the differentiation in populations is not that far off. I think China is more specific in the southeastern part of Asia because it has the highest population than any other country in the world. Also, Indonesia has the highest Islamic population in the world in comparison to other countries. As an added bonus, all of these countries in southeast Asia such as India, Malaysia, Japan, Taiwan and the Philippines are popular for its increase in manufacturing companies higher than any other region in the world throughout the past century.

Lora Tortolani's curator insight, April 20, 2:12 PM

After discussing this picture in class, I know that the statement is true.  I find it incredible that the majority of the world's population lives inside that circle.  I can't even imagine how condense living space must be.  I again am finding myself very fortunate to live where and how I do. 

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Megacities Reflect Growing Urbanization Trend

Read the Transcript: http://to.pbs.org/b6sR86 The capital of the South Asian country Bangladesh, Dhaka, has a population that is booming. However, it stands ...

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Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 1, 2014 2:44 PM

It is very sad that people have to move to a polluted, crowded mess of a place in order to get a better life. The man says at the end that if they can make it work in Dhaka, they could make it work in any city but the beginning is too monumental to get over. I think that maybe some government control over the outer limits of the city and offering a place nearby with some resources may allow more control over the growth of the city at least temporarily.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 8:50 PM

To be a megacity like this, you have to conform to urbanization. There is no possible way to have such a populated and crowed city with farmlands around. This is a place of business yet residential areas, it also is where the marketplaces are and where kids go to school. Megacities need to be a part of an urban society in order for them to stay afloat.

Bec Seeto's curator insight, October 30, 2014 6:07 PM

This is a great introduction to the demographic explosion of the slums within megacities.  This is applicable to many themes within geography.   

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Nepal earthquake: Hundreds die, many feared trapped

Nepal earthquake: Hundreds die, many feared trapped | ApocalypseSurvival | Scoop.it
At least 970 people have died as Nepal suffered its worst earthquake for more than 80 years, with deaths also reported in India, Tibet and Bangladesh.

 

Tags: Nepal, disasters, physical, tectonics.


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Safe drinking water disappearing fast in Bangladesh

Safe drinking water disappearing fast in Bangladesh | ApocalypseSurvival | Scoop.it
Extreme weather increases salinity of water in coastal areas while excessive demand in Dhaka leaves dwindling supply

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Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 8:25 PM

Simply put, the water in Bangladesh is unsanitary to drink. The salinity of the water is literally just unsafe to digest and something needs to be done about it. The capital is full of people that literally have no water supply and its in such high demand.

Nicole Kearsch's curator insight, November 17, 2014 1:20 PM

This is scary, these people literally do not have water to drink and its not due to sanitation issues like it is in many other places.  With global climate change occurring the water is decreasing or turning salty in Bangladesh.  Even scarier there are people in 'hard to reach' areas that have to walk miles just to get a jug of clean water that can be used to drink.  These peoples lives especially are in great danger.  Even the underground aquifers are in trouble, with the excessive demand on them the fresh water is decreasing quickly, getting to levels where sea water can start to flow in.   This causes the salinization of the water that was previously used for drinking.  Not only is drinking water becoming a problem, but you can't water your crops with salt water, it won't work.  So now not only will these people not have any drinking water, but now they won't have any food either.  Something has to be done and very quickly.  The thought of desalination plants has come up but are also quite expensive.  Unfortunately this may be the route that has to be taken.  Pay the expense to save the people. 

Louis Mazza's curator insight, April 6, 4:51 PM

For those who take clean water for granted, think again. For some access to clean water is a huge obstacle to overcome and live with. Walking to the faucet in America is a gift that most citizenry don’t realize. In Bangladesh access to clean water is lessening as the country is experiencing climate changes. 20% of the 28 million in population are living in the “harsh conditions” as the article states. The climate change is greatly increasing the salinity of the coastal waters. Therefor some people have to travels miles to collect a pitcher of safe water. I cannot imagine doing that. I don’t think I would survive. Floods, storm surges, and cyclones and river bank erosion are all factors causing harm in Bangladesh, threating there drinking water. 

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The Rights and Wrongs of Slum Tourism

The Rights and Wrongs of Slum Tourism | ApocalypseSurvival | Scoop.it
Researchers are heading to Dharavi, Mumbai, to study the impact of slum tours on the residents.

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Ana Cristina Gil's curator insight, November 6, 2013 8:36 PM

I don’t find nothing right about tourist visiting the slum, I feel that the tourist are violating there privacy. They are human being not some historical landmark. If the tourist are not helping this people why are they going? If you are going to visit this places do it because you want to help them, not because you think is interesting their way of living.

Cam E's curator insight, April 1, 2014 11:57 AM

Moral questions are always fun. Personally I don't think going to see slums is all that exploitative in itself, but I would make a distinction between guided tours that cost money, and self-directed tours though. In a guided tour you are paying money to walk through a community and view what life is like for those people, but in a self-directed tour you are just another person walking down the streets and viewing whatever you stumble upon. There are plenty of tours within neighborhoods of different economic value the world over, but these tours are scrutinized because the people touring are as wealthy, or less wealthy, than the people living there. I don't think that a poor community changes this dynamic in an immoral way, as the perceptions of which group is superior come from the own minds of those who feel uncomfortable with it.

 

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, April 10, 2014 9:41 AM

This article rises in interesting question.  Are tours of slums exploitive or beneficial to the slum dwellers?  On the one hand the tours could feel like exploitation and the tourist is viewing attractions at a “zoo”, on the other hand it brings people far removed from slum life in contact with it and can change people’s point of view on the slums.  It can be beneficial if the tour guides donate money to the slums or jobs are sought by slum dwellers to become tour guides.  The question is should slums be hidden away from view or opened up to tourists so that they can see the hardships first hand.  I think that this is an issue that is not clearly black or white; there are many shades of gray involved in this issue.