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Safe drinking water disappearing fast in Bangladesh

Safe drinking water disappearing fast in Bangladesh | ApocalypseSurvival | Scoop.it
Extreme weather increases salinity of water in coastal areas while excessive demand in Dhaka leaves dwindling supply

Via Seth Dixon
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Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, April 12, 8:21 PM

This article describes how drinking water is becoming difficult to find in Bangladesh. Due to climate change, this problem will only get worse. Extreme weather such as floods and cyclones has played a large role in contaminating the drinking water. Even in Dhaka, the world's fastest growing city, the people are having trouble finding safe drinking water. 

Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 4, 11:20 AM

The entire country of Bangladesh is very close to sea level and floods frequently. Frequent flooding introduces salt and garbage into the water supplies and causes them to become unusable. Add to the fact that Dhaka is the fastest growing megacity and there just is not enough clean water to go around.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 5:25 PM

Simply put, the water in Bangladesh is unsanitary to drink. The salinity of the water is literally just unsafe to digest and something needs to be done about it. The capital is full of people that literally have no water supply and its in such high demand.

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The Rights and Wrongs of Slum Tourism

The Rights and Wrongs of Slum Tourism | ApocalypseSurvival | Scoop.it
Researchers are heading to Dharavi, Mumbai, to study the impact of slum tours on the residents.

Via Seth Dixon, ApocalypseSurvival
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Ana Cristina Gil's curator insight, November 6, 2013 5:36 PM

I don’t find nothing right about tourist visiting the slum, I feel that the tourist are violating there privacy. They are human being not some historical landmark. If the tourist are not helping this people why are they going? If you are going to visit this places do it because you want to help them, not because you think is interesting their way of living.

Cam E's curator insight, April 1, 8:57 AM

Moral questions are always fun. Personally I don't think going to see slums is all that exploitative in itself, but I would make a distinction between guided tours that cost money, and self-directed tours though. In a guided tour you are paying money to walk through a community and view what life is like for those people, but in a self-directed tour you are just another person walking down the streets and viewing whatever you stumble upon. There are plenty of tours within neighborhoods of different economic value the world over, but these tours are scrutinized because the people touring are as wealthy, or less wealthy, than the people living there. I don't think that a poor community changes this dynamic in an immoral way, as the perceptions of which group is superior come from the own minds of those who feel uncomfortable with it.

 

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, April 10, 6:41 AM

This article rises in interesting question.  Are tours of slums exploitive or beneficial to the slum dwellers?  On the one hand the tours could feel like exploitation and the tourist is viewing attractions at a “zoo”, on the other hand it brings people far removed from slum life in contact with it and can change people’s point of view on the slums.  It can be beneficial if the tour guides donate money to the slums or jobs are sought by slum dwellers to become tour guides.  The question is should slums be hidden away from view or opened up to tourists so that they can see the hardships first hand.  I think that this is an issue that is not clearly black or white; there are many shades of gray involved in this issue.

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Assessing the Validity of Online Sources

Assessing the Validity of Online Sources | ApocalypseSurvival | Scoop.it

This is a fabulous map---but is the statement true?

 


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lalita pradeep's curator insight, May 14, 2013 7:34 PM

wow....lovely map.........

Sascha Humphrey's curator insight, May 15, 2013 1:52 AM

It's quite amazing!

Courtney Burns's curator insight, November 26, 2013 5:45 AM

When we first looked at this picture in class there was no way that I thought this map could be true. We are warned all the time to be careful what we look at on the internet, because for the most part a lot of the information is not true. When we looked at this photo in class we zoomed in on the area in the circle and first determined what was included  in that circle. Once we were able to detrmine what cities were within that circle we were then able to look up the population in each of those cities. We added up the total of each city to get the total population of the places within the circle. Then we researched the total population of the world. Once we were able to find this we subtracted the population from within the circle from the total population, and what we were left with was smaller than the total population within the circle. Which means that the map was true. I was shocked. There was no way that I thought this was true. What was interesting to me was the process we went through to determine that this map was even true. We had to detrmine the area we were working with and then research the information to get a solution. I think you learn a lot just by this simple picture. This map happened to be true however there are many picture listed under this map that are untrue that we are faced with all the time, that if we took the time to research we woudl realize are silly pictures. Just by researching information about a picutre like this can teach us a lot about a place. 

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Megacities Reflect Growing Urbanization Trend

Read the Transcript: http://to.pbs.org/b6sR86 The capital of the South Asian country Bangladesh, Dhaka, has a population that is booming. However, it stands ...

Via Seth Dixon
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Peter Steffan's curator insight, October 9, 2013 1:51 PM

See attached video clips!

Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 1, 11:44 AM

It is very sad that people have to move to a polluted, crowded mess of a place in order to get a better life. The man says at the end that if they can make it work in Dhaka, they could make it work in any city but the beginning is too monumental to get over. I think that maybe some government control over the outer limits of the city and offering a place nearby with some resources may allow more control over the growth of the city at least temporarily.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 5:50 PM

To be a megacity like this, you have to conform to urbanization. There is no possible way to have such a populated and crowed city with farmlands around. This is a place of business yet residential areas, it also is where the marketplaces are and where kids go to school. Megacities need to be a part of an urban society in order for them to stay afloat.