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2012 United States Peace Index

For a static version of this information, see: http://www.visionofhumanity.org/unitedstatespeaceindex/2012/


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APHuG Economic and Urban Development
Topics pertaining to AP HuG Unit 6 and 7: Economics and Urban Development
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Is There a Secret Recipe for Successful Urban Development? « The ...

Is There a Secret Recipe for Successful Urban Development? « The ... | APHuG Economic and Urban Development | Scoop.it
Both developed and developing world cities are still struggling to get urban development right, said some of the world's leading urban experts at the Transforming Transportation conference organized by the World Bank Group ...
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Home-grown food part of a new vision of urban development: Mark Cullen - Toronto Star

Home-grown food part of a new vision of urban development: Mark Cullen - Toronto Star | APHuG Economic and Urban Development | Scoop.it
Toronto Star Home-grown food part of a new vision of urban development: Mark Cullen Toronto Star Why not leave the valley lands to the conservationists, the table land to thoughtful development and the in-between real estate (like the 100-year...
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Redlining in 1936 Philadelphia

Redlining in 1936 Philadelphia | APHuG Economic and Urban Development | Scoop.it

 These are great images that shows the can build historical and geographical empathy for those that were discriminated against during the era of redlining.  These maps from the Home Owners' Loan Corporation mapped and shaped regions of urban disinvestment (but the maps were NOT widely circulated).  This example of redlining in 1936 Philadelphia, links you to primary source documents if you click on the map.  The documents are reports on the property values, resident demographics and descriptions of the residential zones.  For more on the Philadelphia redlining research project, visit: http://cml.upenn.edu/redlining/intro.html


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GIS and The City 2.0

GIS and The City 2.0 | APHuG Economic and Urban Development | Scoop.it

The City, for the first time in human history, houses more of our species than the countryside.  This fundamental fact means that geographers must study the city more.  GIS offers many of the tools needed for that type of sustained inquiry. Geospatial technologies are no longer only for the 'tech geeks,' researchers or even the tech saavy; GIS and other technologies are a learning platform for 21st century geo-literacy.  


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The world map of chocolate (made out of chocolate)

The world map of chocolate (made out of chocolate) | APHuG Economic and Urban Development | Scoop.it
You may be focussing on chocolate over the weekend - but where does it come from? A global trade analysed. In chocolate (this is what maps are made for!

 

What is the geography of chocolate like?  There is a dark side (no pun intended) to the production of cocoa in many places such as West Africa. 


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Crissy Borton's curator insight, December 11, 2012 6:53 PM

Very cool map. I have never really paid attention to where my chocolate came from before. 

ethne staniland's curator insight, May 16, 2013 8:33 AM

Interesting for our KS1 chocolate topic.

Brett Sinica's curator insight, November 10, 2013 2:43 PM

We all love chocolate.  We all love diamonds and jewels.  In western worlds, these items are easily come by in grocery stores and elsewhere, but what got them there was a challenge.  People in poorer tropical regions around the world worked to get the raw goods of these delicate items we all enjoy.  The payout difference is immense from cocoa to chocolate.  It is sometimes a very crooked market where if it wasn't for the hard working people who get the raw ingredients, chocolate as we know it wouldn't be the same.

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Containerization Shaped Globalization

Sometimes a single unlikely idea can have massive impact across the world. Sir Harold Evans, the author of They Made America, describes how frustration drove...

 

The economies of scale that globalization depends on, relies on logistics and transportation networks that can handle this high-volume.  In a word, the container, as mundane as it may seem, facilitated the era within which we live today. 


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Blanca Bernabé García's curator insight, October 4, 2013 11:01 AM

Una amena historia de la globalización 

Donald Dane's comment, December 10, 2013 7:06 AM
this video was probably the most interesting to me from class. it went to the root of this increase in shipping and broke it down to its bare structure and helped you see the true evolution of shipping around the world. starting from wooden ships traveling all the way around the southern tip of Brazil ending up stacking freight boats which travel through the panama canal. it went into depth about how the inventor of freight stacking thought of his idea. first by being a shipper himself but from a truck stand point and showed his evolution to designing to doing to mastering. now this idea and method is the only and fastest way for all shipping routes from Asia to americas from Europe to Africa.
Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 6, 7:12 AM

The economies of scale that globalization depends on, relies on logistics and transportation networks that can handle this high-volume.  In a word, the container, as mundane as it may seem, facilitated the era within which we live today.

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A review for the APHG test

This is fantastic compilation of resources to act as a culminating review before the big test.  For more resources from this great educator, see: https://pantherfile.uwm.edu/jnelsen/www/


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Molly Diallo's comment, April 16, 2012 8:30 AM
This is a wonderful resource! Do you happen to know where I could find a key?
Seth Dixon's comment, April 16, 2012 8:57 AM
This was specifically designed as a 'keyless' resource. How the teach who created it uses it: he has the students produce the key as the review activity, and if they don't know the answer, they look it up. Hope it can still be of use to you...the creator was jnelsen@uwm.edu
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Welcome to the Anthropocene

A 3-minute journey through the last 250 years of our history, from the start of the Industrial Revolution to the Rio+20 Summit. The film charts the growth of...

 

This video is a great primer for discussing human and environmental interactions as related to industrialization, globalization and climate change. 


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Eduardo Paes: The 4 commandments of cities

TED Talks Eduardo Paes is the mayor of Rio de Janeiro, a sprawling, complicated, beautiful city of 6.5 million.

 

What should city planners be doing to maintain a vibrant city?  The Mayor of Rio de Janeiro explains his vision for cities and city management for the future. 


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Living in the New Metropolis

Living in the New Metropolis | APHuG Economic and Urban Development | Scoop.it
Documenting the megacities of our time....

 

Over half of humanity is living in cities and that statistic is likely to reach 70% by 2050.  Studying the urban environment, especially the 'megacities' (cities with populations over 10 million people) which are growing especially fast, becomes increasingly important.  This photo gallery of the worlds 23 megacites employs long exposure images, with highlights the movements and dynamism of the urban networks.  To see the gallery and this stunning image of Jakarta's rush hour traffic, visit: http://www.nytimes.com/slideshow/2012/05/06/sunday-review/06METROPOLIS.html?ref=sunday#4   


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Niger 'worst place to be mother'

Niger 'worst place to be mother' | APHuG Economic and Urban Development | Scoop.it
The West African state of Niger is now the worst place in the world to be a mother, a Save the Children annual report says.

 

Gender, demographics and development are the main geographic themes that run through this report.  As many countries prepare to celebrate Mother's Day, the Non-Governmental Organization Save the Children considers the geography of motherhood and the difficulties in raising a healthy, educated, well-fed child with economic opportunities for the future.  The variables used in the index included factors such as health, education, economic status and nutrition as key indicators that would be pertinent to motherhood. 

 

The most difficult place to raise a child according to the report are: 1) Niger, 2) Afghanistan, 3) Yemen, 4) Guinea-Bissau and 5)Mali.  The best places to raise healthy, education children are: 1) Norway, 2) Iceland, 3) Sweden, 4) New Zealand and 5)Denmark.  For more information about Save the Children, see: http://www.savethechildren.net/


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Concentric Zones of Building Age in Chicago

Concentric Zones of Building Age in Chicago | APHuG Economic and Urban Development | Scoop.it

"Many of the original and innovative contributions to the field of urban sociology came out of the University of Chicago in the early 20th Century. Influenced by the natural sciences, in particular evolutionary biology, members of the Chicago School forwarded an ecological approach to sociology emphasizing the interaction between human behavior, social structures and the built environment. In their view, competition over scarce resources, particularly land, led to the spatial differentiation of urban areas into zones of similar use and similar social groups.

Two of the major proponents of urban ecology were Ernest Burgess and Robert E. Park, professors at the University of Chicago, who together in 1925 published a book entitled The City." 

 

Many students struggle with models when there isn't a corresponding example.  The Concentric Zone Model and Chicago are a great marriage. 


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Making Cities Sing

Making Cities Sing | APHuG Economic and Urban Development | Scoop.it
In urban centers around the country, local governments are looking to attract emerging industries and the next generation of entrepreneurs.

 

This video shows a panel of urbanists presenting at the Aspen Ideas Festival.  The panelists specialize in revitalizing cities and creating economically and culturally vibrant urban centers.  They focus not on public policy, but rather finding ways to implement the locally produced ideas of people from the neighborhood with an intimate knowledge of the community as well as a vested in strengthening the local networks.  They also highlight the arts, sense of place and the culture of a neighborhood as key components create attractive cities.

 

More videos from the Apsen Ideas Festival on urbanism, see: http://www.aspenideas.org/session/advice-megacity


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Urban Development: EXPLODING A MYTH | Orissa Post

Urban Development: EXPLODING A MYTH | Orissa Post | APHuG Economic and Urban Development | Scoop.it
BOTTOM1 India's urban population is increasing at a faster rate than its total population. For the first time in the history of demographic record the Census of 2011-12 finds that the urban population growth rate is faster than ...
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One billion slum dwellers

One billion slum dwellers | APHuG Economic and Urban Development | Scoop.it
One billion people worldwide live in slums, a number that will likely double by 2030. The characteristics of slum life vary greatly between geographic regions, but they are generally inhabited by the very poor or socially disadvantaged.

 

There was significant publicity last year when the world population reached 7 billion.  Barely a whisper was heard when the global population of slum dwellers exceeded 1 billion.  When the world's population reached 7 billion, it was used as a moment to reflect on sustainable growth, resources and the common good for humanity.  This 'milestone' of 1 billion slum dwellers needs to also serve as a teaching moment to reflect on urbanization, migration, human development and the underlying causes that have lead to this explosive growth primarily in the developing world. 


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Nasry Says Hi's curator insight, January 17, 4:49 AM

So, by 2030, its likely that there will be 2 billion people living in slums.

 

Wonderful.

 

What I find most peculiar is, that no matter how much the first world nations insinuate that they are doing their best to solve the problem, work together to end world hunger, blah blah blah. The fact is, according to a video I recently watched, that no matter how much money in alms are given to those in poverty, the country will almost always include taxes, pay deductions, etcetera, and this amount is more than the amount that they had given to them. So technically, the situation is getting worse.

 

Fantastic.

 

I understand that money is a sensitive matter, but really, if you think about it, the government of poorer countries would be overrun by corruption. All because the richer nations care about making money and put that priority over everything else. And here in the fourth richest nation in the world (as of now), our ministers are getting paid hundreds of thousands of dollars monthly to prevent corruption, but we're still rolling in seas of money.So why not help these less privileged countries?

 

I can think of only one reason, and that reason i have mentioned earlier: Corruption. We might be donating to the people of a country, but before that money goes to the people, it would have to go through the government. And there it begins. Say we donate 2 Million Dollars. A lot of money, right? Well, say that Country X has a hundred members of parliament. And to shut everyone up, everyone gets ten thousand dollars. Common sense tells us that they will not get the full amount. Count the authorities the money has to pass through, how many hands the money has exchanged with, the number of pockets that amount of money has filled, and you get only a fraction of what we gave. Considering Country X is a fairly large country, the amount of money will get further divided and the people will only get probably a millionth of what they were supposed to get.

 

Now I have lived in Singapore all my life, and I know I am not in the right position to say this, because i probably will never know how the poorest of the poor survive. But I'm gonna say it anyway.

 

WHY SO MATERIALISTIC???????

 

The money you have is only temporary. Its just a piece of paper. If you have been corrupted, please stop. Because the poorest people in your country are probably farmers. And farmers make food. More money for them,  more incentive for them to work. More work done, more food you get. The more food you get, the less starved you are, the better your country will improve, and eventually, Country X could be a powerful nation.

 

Singapore is a perfect example. Back when it gained independence in 1965, the entire country was practically a slum. But now, less then half a century later, we are now the fourth richest nation in the world.

 

And for the record, I have no idea why I sounded so angry at the beginning.

 

Sean Lim Lin Yuan's comment, January 27, 8:15 PM
Hi wow
Jung Dohun's comment, January 27, 8:43 PM
It is not so easy as you think. There are many countries that does not have land suitable for farming. Also, farming requires water and many countries does not even have water for people to drink. If it was so easy for a country to be wealthy, there might not even be a poor country at all. There must be a good reason behind it and we, for now should not interfere. At most we can do is to donate :)
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Urbanology

Urbanology | APHuG Economic and Urban Development | Scoop.it

"What would your future city look like? Find out now by playing Urbanology online.  Urbanology is a game that examines the complex ways in which cities develop."  This is a great teaching tool since you are asked 10 questions that city planners need to answer that will shape the cultural and economic patterns of the city.  For example, would you remove an automobile lane to put in a bike lane or expand the sidewalk?   Based on your answers, it will tell you what city is most similar to the one you envision and what is your highest (and lowest) priority in laying out the city.  


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Don Brown Jr's comment, July 29, 2012 2:23 PM
It seems Berlin is the ideal city for me since I have a high priority for innovation. How does a specialized city affect it longevity? Is it difficult to redesign, thus serving as a deterrent to innovation? Once you specialize, design and develop it for a certain purpose don’t you also make it venerable to change? (I’m thinking about Detroit)
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Low-income countries are a cigarette's best friend

Low-income countries are a cigarette's best friend | APHuG Economic and Urban Development | Scoop.it

Between 1990 and 2009, cigarette consumption in regions of the world like Western Europe dropped by more than 25% - but that is only one side of the coin.  Historically, cigarette consumption has been a privilege to the rich and high-income countries. Now, with those countries understanding the risks of cancer and the dangers of smoking, the number of smokers decline. But in the past twenty years, for example, the use of cigarettes in the Middle East and Africe has increased by 60%: "Among the 14 countries where 50% or more of men smoke all but one country (Greece) are classified as low- or middle-income."

 

"As consumption rates continue to increase in low- and middle-income countries," the ACS report reads, "these countries will experience a disproportionate amount of tobacco-related illness and death."  In 2009, China consumed 40% of the world's cigarettes.


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Global Healthcare Patterns

Global Healthcare Patterns | APHuG Economic and Urban Development | Scoop.it
The Guardian's health editor introduces our health factfile - and the full dataset behind it...

 

Discussion questions: What regional patterns are there in the per capita healthcare spending?  What connection would you expect between per capita health care spending and the quantity of doctors?  What areas spend the least on healthcare?  How come? 


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Dhaka: fastest growing megacity in the world

A five-part, multimedia series on the coming dystopia that is urbanization.

 

This is a great introduction to the explosion of the slums within megacities.  This video as a part of the article is especially useful.   Click on the title to read the accompanying article.


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Brett Sinica's curator insight, November 19, 2013 11:21 AM

I recently did a project on the topic of megacities in the past, present, and future and how the natural risks they posed.  In past decades there was Tokyo, New York City, or even Mexico City.  I also covered present cities such as Shangai and Los Angeles to name a few.  The city that basically topped the growth charts in my statistics was Dhaka.  The city literally is growing like a chia pet, but with no direct plan or proper use of land.  According to future calculations, the city of Dhaka can reach roughly 23 million by 2025, that's about 600,000 new people coming in every year up until that point.  This video is just an example of how poorly planned this megacity is, and what the future holds for all of the people living there.  It's simply chaos.  There are already squatter settlements and unorganized living conditions for the current residents, picturing the population to grow even more is outrageous!

Meagan Harpin's curator insight, November 20, 2013 8:43 AM

The city of Dhaka has experienced a massivie boom in population. Both the rich and the poor are flowing into this city causing many problems that all complain the government is ignoring instead of fixing. The city is very inefficient, with traffic so bad that it is costing the city millions of dollars. There are frequent water shortages resulting in protests in the streets. There is much infrastructure throughout the city as well. But it is also represents a sense of hope to the people that are coming in and moving into the slums, that with the better jobs and money they will be able to get they can better provide for themselves or their family.

Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, April 6, 8:23 PM

Dhaka is the fastest growing city in the world, as rich and poor people move to the city everyday. So many poor people are moving here due to the fact there is no other place worth living in Bangladesh. The city is facing many problems, such as lack of traffic signals, minimal clean drinking water for residents and horrible housing for many people. However, some feel the city’s slums offer the best chance for an improved life.   

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2012 United States Peace Index

For a static version of this information, see: http://www.visionofhumanity.org/unitedstatespeaceindex/2012/


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Indiana's new right-to-work law could prompt copycats

Indiana's new right-to-work law could prompt copycats | APHuG Economic and Urban Development | Scoop.it
When Indiana Gov. Mitch Daniels signed legislation this month making Indiana the nation's first new right-to-work state in more than a decade, it turned up the heat on a long-simmering debate about the true intent and impact of the controversial...

 

Why do industries locate in particular places?  The accompanying graph and map are loaded with great thematic and spatial information for geography students.  Look at the 'right-to-work' states and mentally overlay what you know of the political map...How does that fit within the ideological leanings of these states?  How does that change employment, industry and income patterns in the various states of the United States?  Why might right-to-work laws be spreading in the near future?  What is the political leaning of the author?  What evidence to leads to that conclusion?      


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Downtowns: How Did We Get Here?

Kennedy Smith is considered one of the nation's leading experts on downtowns, downtown economics, independent business development and the economic impact of urban sprawl, with a long career in downtown revitalization.

 

This video discusses the decline of the American Central Business District, the rise of shopping malls, the importance of the automobile and spatial organization of particular economic sectors.

 

Parts Two  http://vimeo.com/37041011 ; and Three  http://vimeo.com/37050944 ; continue the discussion with an emphasis on practical urban planning policies for small cities to revitalize the downtown region with some domestic and foreign examples. 


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Kenny Dominguez's curator insight, December 11, 2013 9:38 PM

I have wondered about that where these downtowns came from. I have thought of it because I am very curious to learn about downtown providence and how it became a downtown. Where did the word downtown come from? It is amazing how things are being called in this world.

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Kids Who Get Driven Everywhere Don't Know Where They're Going

Kids Who Get Driven Everywhere Don't Know Where They're Going | APHuG Economic and Urban Development | Scoop.it
A new study suggests vehicular travel affects children's ability to navigate their neighborhood and connect to their community.

 

We learn about the places around us by exploring.  Literally our mental map is formed by making choices (in part through trial and error) and that process strengthens our spatial perception of the neighborhood.  Research is showing that kids with a 'windshield perspective' from being driven everywhere are not able to draw as accurate maps as children for who walk and bike their neighborhood.  The built environment and the transportation infrastructure in place play a role in developing spatial thinking skills for young minds. 

 

This is a compelling article with some important implications.  What are the ramifications for geographers?  City planners? Educators?  Families moving to a new neighborhood?   


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Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 11, 2013 7:52 AM

We may not realize it but when we take our kids out on drives to run errands or if we move to a different area we are ruining their understanding of the area they live in. Children often have a hard time of figuring out where they are if they constantly in a car looking at new places. This can cause them to lack a sense of direction and maybe have trouble remembering streets or landmarks near their homes. 

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Interactive: Locating American Manufacturing

Interactive: Locating American Manufacturing | APHuG Economic and Urban Development | Scoop.it
With the slight resurgence of U.S. manufacturing in the recent years—termed a potential "manufacturing moment" by some—it is important to consider not just the future of manufacturing in America but also its geography.

 

This interactive map is brimming with potential to both teach and learn about the changing industrial geographies of the United States.


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Al Picozzi's curator insight, September 12, 2013 4:21 PM

Amazing to see that there still is manufacturing in the US given all the news about it moving to China and other countries.  As the map shows there still is big manufacturing in east of the Mississippi and then manily along the West Coast.  I really thing the US as a whole needs to get back to basics.  Manufacturing is what made this country strong, and I believe that a strong manufacturing sector with a strong services sector will help this country grow.

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Ten Ways Walmart Changed the World

Ten Ways Walmart Changed the World | APHuG Economic and Urban Development | Scoop.it
On July 2, 1962 -- 50 years ago today -- Sam Walton opened the very first Walmart store in Rogers, Arkansas.

 

The Walmart business model has profoundly reshaped the economic paradigm of retail these has 50 years.  Walmart is commonly cited as a business that exemplifies the processes of globalization.  How has Walmart reshaped aspects of society such as industrial production, environmental standards, labor, urban shopping locations, the outsourcing of manufacturing and consumption? 


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Jordan Simon's comment, August 17, 2012 9:12 AM
It is crazy to think that one store could change the world but this one has. Their effective ways of selling and buying products have made this store very well known. Walmart has more than 140 millions customers shop a week which is very impressive. Without Walmart where would we be?
Rj Ocampo's comment, August 24, 2012 4:11 PM
Its amazing to see how far Walmart has come in just 50 years! Sam Walton's philosophy "Always low prices," shaped Walmart to be so successful and could not be the same without it. It's crazy to know that one store could change the globe, I just wonder how much longer Walmart can keep their success going.
Matt Nardone's comment, September 2, 2012 12:19 PM
I have to say that Walmart is my mom's favorite store. I like going there because I know that things are cheaper and I can end up saving money when I get something I need. But I never realized that they put so many small companies out of business trying to make things cheaper for customers. It is a good thing for us but bad for small business guys. What is the right balance?