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Ghosts Of Rwanda

This chilling documentary outlines the historical genocide of Tutsi people predominantly by Hutu's in Rwanda during 1994. So often, students who have always lived within a society with effective political institutions are unable to see how such atrocities could even happen. This video lays the groundwork for understanding the disintegration of political institution within Rwanda, reasons the international community underestimated the threat, why the UN in 1994 (after Somalia) was not prepared to use forceful action and why westerners fled. In this state of lawlessness, the cultural tensions and colonial legacy lead to horrific killings. This genocide has no one reason, but a complex set of geographic contexts. This would be a powerful video to show students. WARNING: considering the content, there are necessarily depictions of death.  To learn more about the documentary, see: http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/pages/frontline/shows/ghosts/


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Matt Mallinson's comment, October 31, 2012 9:30 AM
In this situation I look at America and I can't help but ask "Why didn't you help?" These people were getting killed for no good reason, and we as a nation knew this and did nothing. I'm ashamed that we didn't aid them, my heart goes out for the Rwandan people.
Nick Flanagan's curator insight, December 12, 2012 5:08 PM

while watching this video i was reminded of the very good film Hotel Rwanda, starring Don Cheadle.  The only difference is while Hotel Rwanda is based on a ture story, this is a real life look at what was hapening in this area.  It was sad to see hwat was happening and all I could wonder was why no one decided to hel pthem. 

APHuG Culture
Relates to AP Human Geography Unit 3: Culture
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Quebec language watchdog investigating yogurt spoons - Toronto Star

Quebec language watchdog investigating yogurt spoons - Toronto Star | APHuG Culture | Scoop.it
Quebec language watchdog investigating yogurt spoons Toronto Star CJAD also reported the recent “Pastagate” incident that embarrassed the language watchdog, as it made international headlines and led to the departure of the organization's head.
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Religious architecture of Islam

Religious architecture of Islam | APHuG Culture | Scoop.it
Read Religious architecture of Islam for travel tips, advice, news and articles from all around the world by Lonely Planet...

 

This is an excellent article that can be used in a thematic class for analyzing religion, the human landscape, the urban environment and cultural iconography.  For a regional geography class, this show great images from Indonesia, Spain, Egypt, Syria and Israel/Palestine.  


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Cam E's curator insight, March 4, 8:14 AM

I particularly like this article as it demonstrates something which is lost among talk of Islam. I once was speaking to an Imam about how different sects of Islam could spring up when they only had one holy text which was unchanging. The Imam described to me that each culture attached their own ideas to Islam far in the past, to the point where the two become intertwined and indistinguishable from each other. This can account for the differences we see in architecture, but also the differences we can see in belief and practice of Islam.

Quran Coaching's curator insight, July 18, 9:32 AM
The Quran-Coaching is the best platform for the quran learning by taking online quran classes. www.qurancoaching.com
Quran Coaching's curator insight, July 19, 7:00 AM

Help us spread the message of Quran/Hadith around the world.
Online Quran,online Tajweed.In Shaa Allah
http://goo.gl/st4aLZ
Like/Share/Comment.

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Votes and Vowels: A Changing Accent Shows How Language Parallels Politics

Votes and Vowels: A Changing Accent Shows How Language Parallels Politics | APHuG Culture | Scoop.it

"It may seem surprising, but in this age where geographic mobility and instant communication have increased our exposure to people outside of our neighborhoods or towns, American regional dialects are pulling further apart from each other, rather than moving closer together. And renowned linguist William Labov thinks there’s a connection between political and linguistic segregation.

 

"Labov suggests that it’s these deep-seated political disagreements that create an invisible borderline barring the encroachment of Northern Cities Vowels. When he looked at the relationship between voting patterns by county over the last three Presidential elections and the degree to which speakers in these counties shifted their vowels, he found a tight correlation between the two. And the states that have participated in the vowel shift have also tended to resist implementing the death penalty.

 

"Social identities are complex, and can be defined along a number of different dimensions like class, race, or ethnicity. Not everyone feels that politics are a part of their core identity. But I suspect that political ideology may become an anchor for accents to the extent that large social groups collectively identify themselves by their political beliefs. According to Bill Bishop, author of The Big Sort, this is happening more and more as Americans voluntarily cluster themselves into homogenous, politically like-minded communities."


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Over 27 and unmarried? In China, you’re an old maid

Over 27 and unmarried? In China, you’re an old maid | APHuG Culture | Scoop.it
January and February are sweet times for most Chinese — they enjoy family reunions during the spring festival, which this year fell on January 23, and they celebrate Valentine’s Day, which is well-liked in China.

 

Gender roles in cultural norms change from country to country.  What also needs to be understood is how the demographic situation of a given country influences these patterns. 


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Meagan Harpin's curator insight, October 9, 2013 10:22 AM

It is hard for Chinese women to attract men once they reach a certain age in Beijing it was reported in 2009 that there was 800,000 women 27 and unmarried and the number was rising. Many mothers of these women even argue with them or try to set them up with men they dont like. In the US women are getting married older and older and it is viewed as socially acceptable mainly because they are focusing on their carrers and making sure they are settled first. 

Rebecca Farrea's curator insight, October 21, 2013 10:05 AM

This article is interesting as it discusses one example of how gender roles and cultural norms differ from country to country.  Chinese women who are around 30 years old and single are referred to as "leftover girls".  Similar to a growing trend in the United States, Chinese women are focusing on their careers and their own goals and waiting to marry until they find the right person and have their own lives in order.  However, in the United States, this way of life for women is more socially acceptable whereas in China, it is not as acceptable for these "leftover girls".

Marissa Roy's curator insight, December 5, 2013 10:32 AM

It is interesting to see this as in American culture, marrying in your 20s is not a necessity anymore, it's almost unexpected. With so many men to choose from, these girls have time to find a man. The culture is going to shift as these ladies get married later in life.

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Gender: The Shocking Truth

Gender: The Shocking Truth | APHuG Culture | Scoop.it

"In the poorest regions of the world, girls are among the most disadvantaged people on the planet.

 

---One billion people live in extreme poverty—70% are women and girls.67 million children worldwide don’t go to school, over half are girls.

---One extra year of primary school can mean 10-20% higher wages for a girl.

---When a girl in the developing world stays in school for seven or more years, she’ll marry later and have fewer, healthier children."

 

This site links to the "Because I Am a Girl" initiative which is designed to break the cycle of poverty and strengthen communities.  http://www.planusa.org/becauseiamagirl/ ;


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Latvia votes: Is Russian our language, too?

Latvia votes: Is Russian our language, too? | APHuG Culture | Scoop.it
Like a detective at a crime scene, chief language inspector Antons Kursitis scans the lobby of a hotel in downtown Riga. He spots a brochure that lists hotel services in Russian only, a flagrant violation of Latvia's language laws.

 

"Protecting the Latvian language — that is, safeguarding its supremacy over Russian — has been a priority here since the Soviet occupation ended two decades ago. Those efforts face their biggest test yet on Saturday, in a referendum on whether to make Russian the country's second official language."  What historical, political and demographic factors shape this cultural issue of language?  Why is language often seen as so crucial to cultural identity?  

 

The Latvian voters have spoken: in a massive voter turn-out, they struck down the referendum that sought to make Russian an official language.  "Latvia is the only place throughout the world where Latvian is spoken, so we have to protect it," said Martins Dzerve, 37, in Riga, Latvia's capital. "But Russian is everywhere."  For more on the vote, see: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-17083397    


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Nicholas Rose's comment, September 4, 2012 8:48 AM
This article is really interesting to read about. The reason why is because of the existence of the Soviet Union during World War II. Each Soviet Republic during that time had their own language and children were taught to speak Russian during school. Since the Soviet Union fell after the Cold War in 1991, all of the former Soviet Republics are free countries now and should be allowed to speak their official language instead of Russian.
Derek Ethier's comment, October 17, 2012 10:14 PM
It is definitely important for Latvians to hold on tightly to their culture. However, the Soviet Union caused Russian culture and language to spread throughout the USSR and countries are feeling the effects today. There are millions of Russians in former satellite nations who hold on to their Russian culture. At the same time, these nations wish to regain their national pride especially after the fall of the Soviet Union. It is a difficult conundrum, but I do agree with the Latvians' decision.
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Understanding the Darfur Conflict

This is a short, but effective video to quickly explain the geographic factors that have led to such turmoil within the Darfur region.  For more in-depth resources, see:

http://www.scoop.it/t/darfur-devastation

 


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The Best Countries to Be a Woman -- and the Worst

The Best Countries to Be a Woman -- and the Worst | APHuG Culture | Scoop.it
Hint: India is last among the G20 and the United States didn't crack the top five in the latest survey to reflect poorly on the situation of American women.

 

A poll of 370 gender experts yielded some interesting results that reflect the local cultural, economic, political and developmental geographies.  Beyond using the lists of best and worst countries (since the rankings are still based on rather subjective criteria), students can come up with their most important factors in evaluating gender equity and evaluate the countries based on their own evaluations. 


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Why there's an alarming rash of suicides among Dalit students

Why there's an alarming rash of suicides among Dalit students | APHuG Culture | Scoop.it
Despite the country’s claims to be a sleek 21st-century meritocracy, the habits of centuries of discrimination and social exclusion are not so easily shaken.

 

India is modernizing at a rapid pace, but some old class problems rooted in the caste system are still visible.  This is part of a large series called "Breaking Caste" with some excellent videos, articles and personal vignettes to humanize the struggles of those at the bottom of the social hierarchy.   


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Stacey Jackson's curator insight, May 8, 2013 5:34 PM

This was a very sad story to read. It's a shame that many Dalit students feel ostracized at elite Indian institutions, so much so some go as far as to commit suicide. This is a terrible personal loss for the families and neighbors of the students. But it also is unfortunate news for the country as a whole. India's economic and social growth likely depends on moving beyond old views on class and cate.

Cam E's curator insight, April 1, 8:20 AM

This is interesting in that it's not some silent discrimination, but an extremely overt one where many of these people are being told to their faces that they will not be allowed to pass. My greatest respect goes out to those who fight the hardest for what they want and they must keep trying to achieve it, but sadly those in a position of power in the society were direct barriers to their progress, causing their hope to be lost and the Dalit students to commit suicide.

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Soda vs. Pop with Twitter

Soda vs. Pop with Twitter | APHuG Culture | Scoop.it
One of the great things about Twitter is that it’s a global conversation anyone can join anytime. Eavesdropping on the world, what what!

 

While many educators have been using http://popvssoda.com/ to show the linguistic regions in the United States, this is a similar map, with the added social media component.  To map out these regions, the cartographer used the word choice on geo-tagged tweets as the data source.  For another twitter, map, the following link shows which regions are most actively engaged on Twitter: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/07/06/top-countries-on-twitter_n_1653915.html

What do these regions show us?  What types of regions are these?


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Chris W's comment, August 27, 2012 8:02 AM
This is a really cool use of twitter! I use the term soda, which most of the northeast uses as well.
Courtney Burns's curator insight, September 14, 2013 7:35 PM
Twitter is something that is becoming widely used, and is something I usually check everyday. I never really thought of twitter beyond advertising and communicating. It is amazing the kind of data that can be extracted from peoples tweets. In the soda vs. pop argument I would say soda which makes sense since the data shows that people in the Northeast refer to it as soda. Twitter is so current that you can actually get some current and accurate data just from reading the hash tags in peoples tweets. It's amazing that such information can be extracted from all around the world.
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How Gandhi made tea taboo

How Gandhi made tea taboo | APHuG Culture | Scoop.it

Tea is one of India's most popular beverages and may soon become the national drink. But for many years, it was considered a poison.


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Bashar al-Assad has some thoughts on the English language

Bashar al-Assad has some thoughts on the English language | APHuG Culture | Scoop.it
ㅋㅋㅋㅋㅋㅋㅋㅋ "@FP_Magazine: Bashar al-Assad has some thoughts on the English language http://t.co/CO1ZMChD"...
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Latin America And The English Language - Huffington Post (blog)

Latin America And The English Language - Huffington Post (blog) | APHuG Culture | Scoop.it

Latin America And The English LanguageHuffington Post (blog)More importantly, Latino parents know that language is a key to cultural identity and losing it would reduce the chances to preserve their native culture.


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Ancient Hellenes religion makes comeback in Greece - Public Radio International PRI

Ancient Hellenes religion makes comeback in Greece - Public Radio International PRI | APHuG Culture | Scoop.it
Ancient Hellenes religion makes comeback in Greece Public Radio International PRI The summer solstice, June 21, is one of the most important dates in the calendar for many followers of ancient religions, and it's a special time for people in Greece...
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European Maps: Ethnolinguistics

European Maps: Ethnolinguistics | APHuG Culture | Scoop.it

This site houses several good maps, especially this one of the 'core' and 'periphery' of Europe. This map corresponds with maps that show the first places to be industrialized. The map on the formal culture regions is also useful for understanding cultural barriers to diffusion.  What's the connection between the branches of Christianity and Indo-European language families?  


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The Real Boundaries of the Bible Belt

The Real Boundaries of the Bible Belt | APHuG Culture | Scoop.it
The Atlantic CitiesThe Real Boundaries of the Bible BeltThe Atlantic CitiesReligion in America has an unmistakable geographic dimension.

 

We often hear people in the deep South describe there state as the buckle in the Bible Belt.  This map of religiosity in the United States shows a clear Bible Belt with other interesting patterns (with some pertinent political ramifications in an election year). 


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Ghosts Of Rwanda

This chilling documentary outlines the historical genocide of Tutsi people predominantly by Hutu's in Rwanda during 1994. So often, students who have always lived within a society with effective political institutions are unable to see how such atrocities could even happen. This video lays the groundwork for understanding the disintegration of political institution within Rwanda, reasons the international community underestimated the threat, why the UN in 1994 (after Somalia) was not prepared to use forceful action and why westerners fled. In this state of lawlessness, the cultural tensions and colonial legacy lead to horrific killings. This genocide has no one reason, but a complex set of geographic contexts. This would be a powerful video to show students. WARNING: considering the content, there are necessarily depictions of death.  To learn more about the documentary, see: http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/pages/frontline/shows/ghosts/


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Matt Mallinson's comment, October 31, 2012 9:30 AM
In this situation I look at America and I can't help but ask "Why didn't you help?" These people were getting killed for no good reason, and we as a nation knew this and did nothing. I'm ashamed that we didn't aid them, my heart goes out for the Rwandan people.
Nick Flanagan's curator insight, December 12, 2012 5:08 PM

while watching this video i was reminded of the very good film Hotel Rwanda, starring Don Cheadle.  The only difference is while Hotel Rwanda is based on a ture story, this is a real life look at what was hapening in this area.  It was sad to see hwat was happening and all I could wonder was why no one decided to hel pthem. 

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The Invisible Borders That Define American Culture

The Invisible Borders That Define American Culture | APHuG Culture | Scoop.it
We can be connected (or disconnected) based on where we move, how we speak, and even what sports teams we root for.

 

This article is a great source for discussion material on regions (include the ever-famous "Soda/Pop/Coke" regions).  How do we divide up our world?  What are the criteria we use for doing so?


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Belief in God dips, but not everywhere

Belief in God dips, but not everywhere | APHuG Culture | Scoop.it
Belief in God is on the wane, except that as we age, we tend to believe more. Or perhaps not.

 

The geography of religion, religiosity and atheism are all analyzed in this fasinating news article.


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Europe's failure to integrate Muslims

Europe's failure to integrate Muslims | APHuG Culture | Scoop.it
Laws restricting Islamic symbols in the public sphere are fuelling political distrust and a shared sense of injustice.

 

One of the free response questions in the 2012 AP Human Geography test focused on increasing Muslim population in many European countries.  The Muslim community has (in the view of most Europeans polled) has not adequately assimilated into European society, and with many Europeans feeling a cultural threat, have created a politically charged situation.  Has Europe failed to integrate Muslims or have Muslims failed to integrate in Europe?  Is this a problem?  Why or why not?  To see the APHG test question, click here:  http://apcentral.collegeboard.com/apc/public/repository/ap_frq_human_geo_2012.pdf


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Elizabeth Allen's comment, October 3, 2012 5:49 PM
As we leearned in class, Europe has a declining population. If Europe continues to ban certain religions and culture, then obviously its population will continue to decline. It seems as though religion and poitics clash, just as they do elsewhere around the world. If women want to wear headscarves, let them. They are proud of their religion just as many of us are. Seems to me that the world is becoming more secular, restricitve and intrusive than religious.
Shayna and Kayla's curator insight, February 6, 9:29 AM

This represents the religion section because Europe is restricting islamic symbols causing controversy .

Geography Jordan & Danielle's curator insight, February 7, 10:18 AM

Religion: freedom of religion is not a law is some parts of Europe 

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Gendered Survival Guides for Kids

Gendered Survival Guides for Kids | APHuG Culture | Scoop.it

Many items are marketed specifically for boys or girls.  Boys are given rugged survival skills, while the girl's guide suggests tips of social interactions.  How is this a result of cultural patterns and processes?  How does this form of gendered marketing produce cultural patterns and processed? 


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Jesse Gauthier's comment, September 11, 2012 6:40 PM
This looks like an ad for kids’ adventure books from the mid 1900's conservative era. We each have our own genetic roles as males and females, but this is saying to society that girls can't do activities with the boys and vice versa.
Nicholas Rose's comment, September 13, 2012 7:09 AM
I have to agree because of the fact that males and females are different when it comes to likes and dislikes.
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Five of Asia's Most Endangered Languages

Five of Asia's Most Endangered Languages | APHuG Culture | Scoop.it
Meet the "hairy Ainu" of Japan, Taiwan's Saaroa, the Kusunda of Nepal, the last Manchus and the Jarawa of India's Andaman Islands.

 

The rapid spread of  Mandarin, English, Spanish, Hindi-Urdu and Arabic as the 5 largest languages (most native speakers) is connected to the spread of globalization and the cultural aspects of that phenomenon.  These 5 declining languages represent the flip side of those cultural patterns.  


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‘Why Should Boys Have All the Fun?’

‘Why Should Boys Have All the Fun?’ | APHuG Culture | Scoop.it
Rather than focusing on how to make cities safe at any hour for citizens of both genders, the official response has been to curtail women's access to public areas deemed sensitive by authorities.

 

This is an interesting topic to use to debate urban policies and planning issues.  What leads to a safer city for women?  How does the creation of zones not safe for women impact the city long-term?  Think about scale: Is what is best for the city policy what is best for the individual? 


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Kim Vignale's comment, July 16, 2012 7:10 PM
Women in India are outraged due to the decisions the officials have made. Instead of solving the problem fairly, they are covering up the issue. Women are viewed as inferior in many developing countries. The government is enforcing the law by taking the women's freedom away; they aren't allowed in a pub after 8pm. If the law was fair and practical, officials would enforce strict laws on rape and assault and reiterate the seriousness of the crime and consequences.
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Women in parliament

Women in parliament | APHuG Culture | Scoop.it

ALMOST 20% of the world’s parliamentary seats are now occupied by women, up from 17.2% five years ago, according to the Inter-Parliamentary Union.


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“There’s No Crying in Baseball”: Why is gender still an issue in sport psychology?

“There’s No Crying in Baseball”: Why is gender still an issue in sport psychology? | APHuG Culture | Scoop.it
Do you know who Ema Geron was? If you don’t, you are remiss. Ema Geron was the first president of the Fédération Européene de Psychologie des Sport et des Activitées Corporelles (FEPSAC) and her work...
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