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APHuG Culture
Relates to AP Human Geography Unit 3: Culture
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Religious architecture of Islam

Religious architecture of Islam | APHuG Culture | Scoop.it
Read Religious architecture of Islam for travel tips, advice, news and articles from all around the world by Lonely Planet...

 

This is an excellent article that can be used in a thematic class for analyzing religion, the human landscape, the urban environment and cultural iconography.  For a regional geography class, this show great images from Indonesia, Spain, Egypt, Syria and Israel/Palestine.  


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Quran Coaching's curator insight, August 4, 3:03 PM

The Quran-Coaching is the best platform for the quran learning by taking online quran classes.
www.qurancoaching.com

Quran Coaching's curator insight, August 12, 2:14 PM

The Quran-Coaching is the best platform for the quran learning by taking online quran classes.
http://goo.gl/st4aLZ
Like/Share/Comment.
#quran #onlineQuran #islam #Tajweed

Quran Coaching's curator insight, August 21, 2:10 PM

The Quran-Coaching is the best platform for the quran learning by taking online quran classes.
http://goo.gl/st4aLZ
Like/Share/Comment.
#quran #onlineQuran #islam #Tajweed

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Over 27 and unmarried? In China, you’re an old maid

Over 27 and unmarried? In China, you’re an old maid | APHuG Culture | Scoop.it
January and February are sweet times for most Chinese — they enjoy family reunions during the spring festival, which this year fell on January 23, and they celebrate Valentine’s Day, which is well-liked in China.

 

Gender roles in cultural norms change from country to country.  What also needs to be understood is how the demographic situation of a given country influences these patterns. 


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Meagan Harpin's curator insight, October 9, 2013 1:22 PM

It is hard for Chinese women to attract men once they reach a certain age in Beijing it was reported in 2009 that there was 800,000 women 27 and unmarried and the number was rising. Many mothers of these women even argue with them or try to set them up with men they dont like. In the US women are getting married older and older and it is viewed as socially acceptable mainly because they are focusing on their carrers and making sure they are settled first. 

Rebecca Farrea's curator insight, October 21, 2013 1:05 PM

This article is interesting as it discusses one example of how gender roles and cultural norms differ from country to country.  Chinese women who are around 30 years old and single are referred to as "leftover girls".  Similar to a growing trend in the United States, Chinese women are focusing on their careers and their own goals and waiting to marry until they find the right person and have their own lives in order.  However, in the United States, this way of life for women is more socially acceptable whereas in China, it is not as acceptable for these "leftover girls".

Marissa Roy's curator insight, December 5, 2013 1:32 PM

It is interesting to see this as in American culture, marrying in your 20s is not a necessity anymore, it's almost unexpected. With so many men to choose from, these girls have time to find a man. The culture is going to shift as these ladies get married later in life.

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The Invisible Borders That Define American Culture

The Invisible Borders That Define American Culture | APHuG Culture | Scoop.it
We can be connected (or disconnected) based on where we move, how we speak, and even what sports teams we root for.

 

This article is a great source for discussion material on regions (include the ever-famous "Soda/Pop/Coke" regions).  How do we divide up our world?  What are the criteria we use for doing so?


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Bella The Non-Vampire's curator insight, August 21, 10:22 AM

i believe that these fifty states are divided into three different regions that define them by what those regions are made of. Those regions im talking about are the formal, functional, and vernacular regions. Some types of examples of those regions are common language, transportaion, and mental maps. 

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Belief in God dips, but not everywhere

Belief in God dips, but not everywhere | APHuG Culture | Scoop.it
Belief in God is on the wane, except that as we age, we tend to believe more. Or perhaps not.

 

The geography of religion, religiosity and atheism are all analyzed in this fasinating news article.


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Gendered Survival Guides for Kids

Gendered Survival Guides for Kids | APHuG Culture | Scoop.it

Many items are marketed specifically for boys or girls.  Boys are given rugged survival skills, while the girl's guide suggests tips of social interactions.  How is this a result of cultural patterns and processes?  How does this form of gendered marketing produce cultural patterns and processed? 


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Jesse Gauthier's comment, September 11, 2012 9:40 PM
This looks like an ad for kids’ adventure books from the mid 1900's conservative era. We each have our own genetic roles as males and females, but this is saying to society that girls can't do activities with the boys and vice versa.
Nicholas Rose's comment, September 13, 2012 10:09 AM
I have to agree because of the fact that males and females are different when it comes to likes and dislikes.
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Five of Asia's Most Endangered Languages

Five of Asia's Most Endangered Languages | APHuG Culture | Scoop.it
Meet the "hairy Ainu" of Japan, Taiwan's Saaroa, the Kusunda of Nepal, the last Manchus and the Jarawa of India's Andaman Islands.

 

The rapid spread of  Mandarin, English, Spanish, Hindi-Urdu and Arabic as the 5 largest languages (most native speakers) is connected to the spread of globalization and the cultural aspects of that phenomenon.  These 5 declining languages represent the flip side of those cultural patterns.  


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The Real Boundaries of the Bible Belt

The Real Boundaries of the Bible Belt | APHuG Culture | Scoop.it
The Atlantic CitiesThe Real Boundaries of the Bible BeltThe Atlantic CitiesReligion in America has an unmistakable geographic dimension.

 

We often hear people in the deep South describe there state as the buckle in the Bible Belt.  This map of religiosity in the United States shows a clear Bible Belt with other interesting patterns (with some pertinent political ramifications in an election year). 


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Ghosts Of Rwanda

This chilling documentary outlines the historical genocide of Tutsi people predominantly by Hutu's in Rwanda during 1994. So often, students who have always lived within a society with effective political institutions are unable to see how such atrocities could even happen. This video lays the groundwork for understanding the disintegration of political institution within Rwanda, reasons the international community underestimated the threat, why the UN in 1994 (after Somalia) was not prepared to use forceful action and why westerners fled. In this state of lawlessness, the cultural tensions and colonial legacy lead to horrific killings. This genocide has no one reason, but a complex set of geographic contexts. This would be a powerful video to show students. WARNING: considering the content, there are necessarily depictions of death.  To learn more about the documentary, see: http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/pages/frontline/shows/ghosts/


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Matt Mallinson's comment, October 31, 2012 12:30 PM
In this situation I look at America and I can't help but ask "Why didn't you help?" These people were getting killed for no good reason, and we as a nation knew this and did nothing. I'm ashamed that we didn't aid them, my heart goes out for the Rwandan people.
Nick Flanagan's curator insight, December 12, 2012 8:08 PM

while watching this video i was reminded of the very good film Hotel Rwanda, starring Don Cheadle.  The only difference is while Hotel Rwanda is based on a ture story, this is a real life look at what was hapening in this area.  It was sad to see hwat was happening and all I could wonder was why no one decided to hel pthem. 

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Latvia votes: Is Russian our language, too?

Latvia votes: Is Russian our language, too? | APHuG Culture | Scoop.it
Like a detective at a crime scene, chief language inspector Antons Kursitis scans the lobby of a hotel in downtown Riga. He spots a brochure that lists hotel services in Russian only, a flagrant violation of Latvia's language laws.

 

"Protecting the Latvian language — that is, safeguarding its supremacy over Russian — has been a priority here since the Soviet occupation ended two decades ago. Those efforts face their biggest test yet on Saturday, in a referendum on whether to make Russian the country's second official language."  What historical, political and demographic factors shape this cultural issue of language?  Why is language often seen as so crucial to cultural identity?  

 

The Latvian voters have spoken: in a massive voter turn-out, they struck down the referendum that sought to make Russian an official language.  "Latvia is the only place throughout the world where Latvian is spoken, so we have to protect it," said Martins Dzerve, 37, in Riga, Latvia's capital. "But Russian is everywhere."  For more on the vote, see: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-17083397    


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Nicholas Rose's comment, September 4, 2012 11:48 AM
This article is really interesting to read about. The reason why is because of the existence of the Soviet Union during World War II. Each Soviet Republic during that time had their own language and children were taught to speak Russian during school. Since the Soviet Union fell after the Cold War in 1991, all of the former Soviet Republics are free countries now and should be allowed to speak their official language instead of Russian.
Derek Ethier's comment, October 18, 2012 1:14 AM
It is definitely important for Latvians to hold on tightly to their culture. However, the Soviet Union caused Russian culture and language to spread throughout the USSR and countries are feeling the effects today. There are millions of Russians in former satellite nations who hold on to their Russian culture. At the same time, these nations wish to regain their national pride especially after the fall of the Soviet Union. It is a difficult conundrum, but I do agree with the Latvians' decision.
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The Best Countries to Be a Woman -- and the Worst

The Best Countries to Be a Woman -- and the Worst | APHuG Culture | Scoop.it
Hint: India is last among the G20 and the United States didn't crack the top five in the latest survey to reflect poorly on the situation of American women.

 

A poll of 370 gender experts yielded some interesting results that reflect the local cultural, economic, political and developmental geographies.  Beyond using the lists of best and worst countries (since the rankings are still based on rather subjective criteria), students can come up with their most important factors in evaluating gender equity and evaluate the countries based on their own evaluations. 


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Why there's an alarming rash of suicides among Dalit students

Why there's an alarming rash of suicides among Dalit students | APHuG Culture | Scoop.it
Despite the country’s claims to be a sleek 21st-century meritocracy, the habits of centuries of discrimination and social exclusion are not so easily shaken.

 

India is modernizing at a rapid pace, but some old class problems rooted in the caste system are still visible.  This is part of a large series called "Breaking Caste" with some excellent videos, articles and personal vignettes to humanize the struggles of those at the bottom of the social hierarchy.   


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Stacey Jackson's curator insight, May 8, 2013 8:34 PM

This was a very sad story to read. It's a shame that many Dalit students feel ostracized at elite Indian institutions, so much so some go as far as to commit suicide. This is a terrible personal loss for the families and neighbors of the students. But it also is unfortunate news for the country as a whole. India's economic and social growth likely depends on moving beyond old views on class and cate.

Cam E's curator insight, April 1, 11:20 AM

This is interesting in that it's not some silent discrimination, but an extremely overt one where many of these people are being told to their faces that they will not be allowed to pass. My greatest respect goes out to those who fight the hardest for what they want and they must keep trying to achieve it, but sadly those in a position of power in the society were direct barriers to their progress, causing their hope to be lost and the Dalit students to commit suicide.