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Cities and Urban Land Use

Cities and Urban Land Use | APHUG | Scoop.it
A new advertising campaign is seeking to draw attention to the gap between the wealthy and the poverty-stricken in Mexico by showing how they co-exist in disturbingly close proximity.

Via Seth Dixon
Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's insight:

An advertising campaign hopes to show the differences of income and living standards between neighborhoods in Mexico.

The place of these areas are so vastly different as well as there interactions as the lower class makes shanty architecture and the upper class develops large condos and buildings just for residence.

more...
Alec Castagno's curator insight, October 3, 1:21 PM

The pictures show the deep divide between rich and poor in Mexico. These settlements are built to the point where luxurious condos share a wall with decaying slum housing. The roads do not connect the areas, showing how these places were constructed separately by to distinctly different communities. While the proximity between sections shows that sights, sounds, and smells most likely carry across the two sections, the rich area looks as if it has no idea what lies directly beyond their walls. The fact that the rich areas are literally walled off from the rest of the surrounding area says a lot about the deep economic divides found around the world today.

Jennifer Brown's curator insight, October 5, 9:42 AM

This photo is amazing! Not only does it show the great differance between the rich and the poor but it also shows how Mexicos social class exists. It looks like a before and after! The grass really is greener on the otherside.

Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, December 16, 9:02 AM

Right away from looking at this picture, you can tell which side is which. I didn't even have to read the article yet to find out where the wealthier people lived and where the not so wealthy lived. The colors stood out the most to me. In the picture on the left, it is clear that this is the not so wealthy part in Mexico. The color is just filled with dark and gloominess, mostly shown in gray. The houses are also pushed very closely together. On the right side, it appears that this is the richer side of Mexico. Although the houses are closer together like the picture on the left, they are colorful. They have firm built roofs and appear to be built and taken care of much better. Something else that gives you the sense of which community is more rich is the cars. There is a whole line of cars in the right picture while in the left picture we see a few here and there. The right picture also illustrates lawns. We slightly see some grass in the left, but it is clearly not as well taken care of as the lawns in the right picture. This picture was done as an advertisement to draw attention to the gap between the two different communities. The campaign goes by the name "Erase the Differences" and hopes to get people to realize the differences in poverty that are right in front of them.

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Industrialization and Economic Development China Has Accomplished Something In Global Trade Not Seen Since Colonial Britain

Industrialization and Economic Development                                                  China Has Accomplished Something In Global Trade Not Seen Since Colonial Britain | APHUG | Scoop.it

"China is a true mega-trader — a position last held by colonial Britain, with trade significant not only as a share of world trade (11.5%) but also of its own GDP (47%).  The U.S. is China's top export destination. China's trade with Latin America has risen more than 200 times since 1990 and is the fastest-growing corridor. China's trade is beginning to slow, however. Exports accounted for about 25% of GDP in 2012, down from 35% in 2007." 


Via Seth Dixon
Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's insight:

China's exportation has grown so high and has reached a multitude of nations, not unlike British Imperialism. Though China has reached a lot of nation and has grown economically, it has also slowed down.

The movement of goods is greatly portrayed in economic sectors through trade patterns.

 

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Paige Therien's curator insight, May 4, 9:09 AM

This article offers an interesting piece of insight, which is that China has become the biggest trader in the world, and has even surpassed colonial Britain was at the time.  During colonial times, and throughout history, China kept to themselves.  Britain, on the other hand was becoming a world superpower because of their demands for goods.  The article offers four reasons why this trend will continue for China including a firm control of its position in the market, increasing global demand for China's services, a shift towards a more balanced trade (i.e. more imports), and its established infrastructure.  However, they do not touch upon the negative aspects of environmental and humanitarian issues that have been brought along with global trade, and which may be the demise of China's trade market.

Sean Goins's curator insight, November 13, 1:31 PM

in the global market, china has become the rising power in the exporting market with latin america which has risen more than 200 times since 1990 and is the fastest, but has also slowed down in more recent times but is still one of the largest exporters in the world

Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, December 16, 10:38 PM

A new Standard Chartered report by Madhur Jha and other Standard Chartered economists, titled "Global Trade Unbundled," highlights just how much of a trading giant China has become. "China is a true mega trader-- a position last held by colonial Britain, with trade significant not only as a share of world trade but also of its own GDP", according to Jha. "China will likely become a champion of free trade." In 2013, China topped the United States for the first time. China's imports and exports of goods amounted to $4.16 trillion dollars. The United States is China's top destination for exports. This is obvious because if we look on half the items we use daily, they probably say "Made in China". China's exports with Latin America and Africa are still continuing to grow rapidly. Jha and others believe that China will remain the top trader mostly because the economic recovery is a positive for China. Also because a lot of attention is paid towards exports from China rather than imports. China's trade rates are likely to keep growing at a steady pace.

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Cities and Urban Land Use Primate Cities: Mexico City

http://geographyeducation.org/2014/05/05/primate-cities-mexico-city/


Via Seth Dixon
Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's insight:

Primate Cities are furthered studied using Mexico as an example.

Primate cities affect movement by having a greater pull on migrants.

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dilaycock's curator insight, May 5, 5:52 PM

Seth Dixon, creator of this excellent resource, notes, "I put together this presentation, based primarily on my time researching in Mexico City (download the PPT file to access my notes for each slide).  The problems with primate cities are hardly unique to Mexico City; this additional BBC article bemoans Britain’s lack of a true second city, arguing that London’s shadow looms too large for sustained national development outside of the primate city."

Jason Wilhelm's curator insight, May 22, 12:24 PM

The concept of a primate city has both benefits and drawbacks for the country in which it is located. The large population of the primate city draws new technology and foreign investment into the country. Unfortunately, the large population of the primate city also leads to population and brain drain from the surrounding regions which can damage the overall economic and intellectual status of the country. 

John Nieuwendyk's curator insight, October 6, 2:49 PM

The spatial population of Mexico City is densely packed. The south-west side of the city or the Western Sector zone features upscale, wealthy neighborhoods. The north and eastern sectors of the city are densely populated and are the poorer sectors of the city. It is interesting looking at the city from a top-down aerial view. One can see that the wealthier western sector’s spatial geography is spread out more so than the poorer sectors and features more vegetation, possibly due to an environmentally friendly irrigation system. 

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Population Uneven Population Distribution

Population                                                      Uneven Population Distribution | APHUG | Scoop.it

"60% of Iceland's population lives in the red area."


Via Seth Dixon
Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's insight:

The majority of Iceland's population lives in that one space.

The geography of Iceland keeps the majority of people in the place that sustains life and comfort the best and easiest.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 7, 9:02 AM

Similar to Iceland, Australia's population is also highly clustered.    


Questions to Ponder: Why is Iceland's population so highly clustered?  What is it about the red (and white) areas on the map that explain this pattern?  What other layers of information do we need to properly contextualize this information?  


Tags: Iceland, population, density.

Kaitlin Young's curator insight, December 13, 10:50 AM

Iceland is a beautiful place, yet hash climates and landscapes make it hard for equal population distribution. At the same time, its population is under 400,000 people, making it a relatively small population compared to those of other European countries. With a population that small, it almost makes sense for people to live closer to one another. It would be easier to build infrastructure in a smaller area than to spread it out all over the island, where it would hardly be utilized. Also, the one densely populated area allows for a creative center where money and ideas can be developed.

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Cities and Urban Land Use

Cities and Urban Land Use | APHUG | Scoop.it

"In the above poster the cities are arranged (roughly, in order to maximize space) by population. Clearly, size and population are not directly correlated. Some cities take up a lot more space for a smaller population. The relationship between the two, of course, is known as density (population density, urban density)."


Via Seth Dixon
Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's insight:

The cities are organized (approximately) to population and shows the size of cities accordingly. The different sizes of cities and their correlating populations is thus revealed from urban places around the world. 

Urban regions stay rather functional and could be seem similar across the board, focusing on major economic activity and transportation.

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Vincent Lahondère's curator insight, May 14, 4:38 PM

Surprenant et très pédagogique

Jason Wilhelm's curator insight, May 22, 12:21 PM

Urban sprawl is a rising problem in the world due to the lack of control and its massive impact on the surrounding environment. These footprints show how unique each city's sprawl is. The surrounding environment is playing a huge role in where and how far each city extends. Chicago, for example, is limited on its eastern side due to Lake Erie's close proximity, and Cleveland is in a similar situation but on its north side where Lake Erie is. 

Mrs. K's curator insight, August 27, 7:17 AM

1G Theme 2: 6 Billion people and me

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Political Organization of Space America’s most gerrymandered congressional districts

Political Organization of Space            America’s most gerrymandered congressional districts | APHUG | Scoop.it
A brief overview of crimes against geography in the 113th Congress.

Via Seth Dixon
Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's insight:

A showing of the gerrymandering districts of the most absurd kind.

Gerrymandering bases itself off the place of the districts in an attempt to sway voting in favor of one party or another or even for the most equal by dealing with similar human characteristics.

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Kampe Kyle's curator insight, May 28, 10:01 PM

In AP Human Geo., this relates to the concept of gerrymandering, which is the practice of creating certain political boundaries in order to favor a certain political party and its representative.

Lauren Sellers's curator insight, May 29, 10:04 AM

This concept is used to favor certain political parties in certain areas. There are rules like the ditrict has to be all connected but they can manipulate the redrawing to make it that a certain party still wins that district.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, May 30, 3:15 PM

unit 4

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INdustrialization and Economic Development Where the extremely poor live

INdustrialization and Economic Development                                                     Where the extremely poor live | APHUG | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon
Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's insight:

This graphic reveals the poorest populations and where they live and even though India and China are economic competitors on the global stage they still have the poorest communities. 

IN poor communities, the human place is changed by using less structurally sound architecture and disregarding cultural presence for functionality though holding true to cultural presence in individual lives.

more...
Gorete Queiroga de Figueiredo's curator insight, May 4, 7:34 PM

Os extremamente pobres não vivem [existem] existem mais aqui.

dilaycock's curator insight, May 5, 8:52 PM

This information is taken from the World Bank's 2014 report "Prosperity for All." The report looks at "progress to date in reducing global poverty and discusses some of the challenges of reaching the interim target of reducing global poverty to 9 percent by 2020.... . It also reports on the goal of promoting shared prosperity, with a particular focus on describing various characteristics of the bottom 40 percent."

Amanda Morgan's curator insight, September 18, 11:49 AM

I agree with this article from the Guardian that development should be measured in human rights gains more than economic advancements.  While globalization is taking place and allowing countries to trade and maximize profits, a large percent of people in the world are deprived basic human rights and are entirely forgotten about and not valued.

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Population Population pyramids: Powerful predictors of the future

"Population statistics are like crystal balls -- when examined closely, they can help predict a country's future (and give important clues about the past). Kim Preshoff explains how using a visual tool called a population pyramid helps policymakers and social scientists make sense of the statistics, using three different countries' pyramids as examples."


Via Seth Dixon
Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's insight:

Population statistics help show past, present, and future issues and concerns of certain areas ranging from health to women's' issues.

The movement of people in and out of areas affect population statistics and the landscape of areas either positively of negatively.

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Kyle Kampe's curator insight, May 27, 10:31 PM

In AP Human Geo., this relates to the theme of population pyramids because it gives a compelling explanation of how to interpret population pyramids and why they are significant for extrapolating into the future.

Lona Pradeep Parad's curator insight, May 28, 6:54 PM

This video proves how population pyramids can predict the current and future state of a country such as Rwanda.

Nancy Watson's curator insight, September 26, 4:04 PM

Population unit

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Cities and Urban Land Use Growth Rings

Cities and Urban Land Use                         Growth Rings | APHUG | Scoop.it

"Maps Of U.S. Population Change, 2000-2010.  Blue is population increase, red represents population decline."


Via Seth Dixon
Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's insight:

These maps show the changes of urban areas in America and the patterns and problems each one goes through.

These human places go through similar development patterns and all focus economically but still have different landscapes as a place.

more...
Linda Alexander's curator insight, May 8, 9:55 AM

This series of maps show the population patterns impacting the United States.  

Kate Buckland's curator insight, May 17, 8:01 PM

The donut effect!

Whitney Souery's curator insight, May 29, 4:25 PM

Detroit has an increasing population, along with the outskirts of Chicago (suburbs). This  increasing population represents areas that are prospering  because of economic factors. Just as some businesses in Detroit are coming back, businesses in the suburbs in Chicago are also growing, contributing to an increasing population as well. This map reflects economic and social factors (ethnicity) in the present and can be used to get an understanding of America's population growth/decline. 

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Agricultural and Rural Land Use The Great Green Wall

Agricultural and Rural Land Use                 The Great Green Wall | APHUG | Scoop.it
The Great Green Wall initiative uses an integrated approach to restore a diversity of ecosystems to the North African landscape.

Via Seth Dixon
Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's insight:

The Green Wall hopes to restore the environment of the North African area that was destroyed by desertification from overgrazing.

Desertification is one of the many consequences of Human-Environment Interaction that comes mainly from agricultural activity.

more...
Hector Alonzo's curator insight, December 15, 3:13 PM

Hopefully seeing the efforts of these African countries to better their ecosystem gives the rest of the world the kick it needs to help out countries that are suffering. The countries are the ones that are hit with the worst conditions for their land, causing it to dry up due to the extreme heat and limited rainfall, the overgrazing of animals feeding of the land and contributing to the lands degradation. This Project is moving ahead nicely, with the countries establishing sustainable farms that will help food production.

Alec Castagno's curator insight, December 17, 11:30 AM

By fixing the environmental factors threatening the region, these countries will see not just an improvement in their lands and biodiversity but across political and economic factors as well. It can increase crop yield which can in turn help offer stability to regions that are experiencing problems stemming from poverty in insufficient food sources. The project is promising because it is not a blanket plan across the entire region, but is tailored to fit the unique and different places found throughout the area.

Wilmine Merlain's curator insight, December 18, 11:56 AM

I like the idea of these countries who face the same issues joining together to combat and find a solution for there problems with climate change, desertion, gentrification. I like the idea of the African continent joining arms in order to address the same issues there neighboring countries face. While Africa is always portrayed as a land ridden with war and strife with one another, this great image of all these nations uniting is a positive move towards a bright future for the continent. 

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Cities and Urban Land Use

Cities and Urban Land Use | APHUG | Scoop.it
A new advertising campaign is seeking to draw attention to the gap between the wealthy and the poverty-stricken in Mexico by showing how they co-exist in disturbingly close proximity.

Via Seth Dixon
Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's insight:

An advertising campaign hopes to show the differences of income and living standards between neighborhoods in Mexico.

The place of these areas are so vastly different as well as there interactions as the lower class makes shanty architecture and the upper class develops large condos and buildings just for residence.

more...
Alec Castagno's curator insight, October 3, 1:21 PM

The pictures show the deep divide between rich and poor in Mexico. These settlements are built to the point where luxurious condos share a wall with decaying slum housing. The roads do not connect the areas, showing how these places were constructed separately by to distinctly different communities. While the proximity between sections shows that sights, sounds, and smells most likely carry across the two sections, the rich area looks as if it has no idea what lies directly beyond their walls. The fact that the rich areas are literally walled off from the rest of the surrounding area says a lot about the deep economic divides found around the world today.

Jennifer Brown's curator insight, October 5, 9:42 AM

This photo is amazing! Not only does it show the great differance between the rich and the poor but it also shows how Mexicos social class exists. It looks like a before and after! The grass really is greener on the otherside.

Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, December 16, 9:02 AM

Right away from looking at this picture, you can tell which side is which. I didn't even have to read the article yet to find out where the wealthier people lived and where the not so wealthy lived. The colors stood out the most to me. In the picture on the left, it is clear that this is the not so wealthy part in Mexico. The color is just filled with dark and gloominess, mostly shown in gray. The houses are also pushed very closely together. On the right side, it appears that this is the richer side of Mexico. Although the houses are closer together like the picture on the left, they are colorful. They have firm built roofs and appear to be built and taken care of much better. Something else that gives you the sense of which community is more rich is the cars. There is a whole line of cars in the right picture while in the left picture we see a few here and there. The right picture also illustrates lawns. We slightly see some grass in the left, but it is clearly not as well taken care of as the lawns in the right picture. This picture was done as an advertisement to draw attention to the gap between the two different communities. The campaign goes by the name "Erase the Differences" and hopes to get people to realize the differences in poverty that are right in front of them.