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Thomas Malthus and Population Growth

Learn more: http://www.khanacademy.org/video?v=r1ywppAJ1xs Thomas Malthus's views on population. Malthusian limits.

 

This is a succinct (but not perfect) summary of Malthusian ideas on population.  What do you think of his ideas?  Any specific parts of his theory that you agree with?  Do you disagree with some of his ideas?  What did history have to say about it?  

 

Tags: Demographics, population, models, APHG,  unit 2 population. 


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Lauren Jacquez's curator insight, October 25, 2013 8:01 PM

We will be learning about Malthus in Chapter 2.  Take a sneek peek!

Lauren Sellers's curator insight, May 20, 8:57 AM

The Malthusian ideas maintain that food growth is only linear, while population growth is geometric, so soon population will outgrow food production and famines will occur,

Lona Pradeep Parad's curator insight, May 28, 4:12 PM

This video very well explains the malthusian theory and how it is associated with population

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A world of projections

Welcome, Metafilter visitors! How can you map a sphere unto the plane? well you can't if you want to keep size, shape and proportions. Here are the alternatives... Learn more about the different projections.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 23, 2013 6:23 AM

We are accustomed to spatial distortion in maps; when we see that same distortion on a picture, it gives us an alternative perspective on the level of spatial distortion that we see on maps.  The Azimuthal projections (circular) are my favorite for this photographic project.   


Tagsmapping, cartography, perspective, map.

Ann-Laure Liéval's curator insight, March 24, 2013 4:55 AM

Des cartes pour comprendre le monde...une initiative photographique pour comprendre les projections. 

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Photos of Children From Around the World With Their Most Prized Possessions

Photos of Children From Around the World With Their Most Prized Possessions | APHG Nature and Perspectives, Population and Migration, Culture | Scoop.it
Chiwa - Mchinji, Malawi Shot over a period of 18 months, Italian photographer Gabriele Galimberti's project Toy Stories compiles photos of children from around the world with their prized possesions—their toys.

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John Slifko's curator insight, March 22, 2013 10:53 PM

geography and history were two of Dewey's most important tools in pedagogy in strengthening the imagination of the child 

Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, November 27, 2013 3:40 PM

This is horrifying and really puts things in perspective.  Their toys are not what they need.  None of these kids had anything creative except for the building blocks... I would have liked to have seen some paints and paintings, because I hugely believe that schools suck the creativity out of people's lives.  Toys can be... 'imaginative,' but not really.  Toys get put away when a kid turns 10.  Then they're in school.  Then they're at work... it was interesting to see the farmer girl with farm toys, but seriously, again, creativity should be encouraged at that age.  If people are not creative, they become creatures that absorb the habits and things that they are taught, with no ability to deal with new situations, or adapt their environment in a positive manner to better suit themselves or others.  I hate the stagnancy of the world today.  I used to play guitar in Providence on the streets, I have publically painted at URI, I have given paintings away to friends, and I love sharing ART, which can change the world, if only by one mind at a time.  I believe in the butterfly effect and that these kids should have something artsy as their most prized possession, because to not have that is to reflect the corporate importance in society on buying manufactured goods.  As for the kid with toy guns, it really isn't my business to speak ill of him, but seriously! He will end up with a TV show like Duck Dynasty one day or something... hope it works out for him.

Lauren Sellers's curator insight, May 20, 9:01 AM

This shows us how kids from different regions in the world value certain items that to others may seem almost trivial. Around the world everything is seen differently because situations are different.

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The Struggle for Jihad

The Struggle for Jihad | APHG Nature and Perspectives, Population and Migration, Culture | Scoop.it
Two opposing groups battle to define the word jihad on public buses and subways.

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Kimberly Hordern's comment, April 30, 2013 5:07 AM
It is sad that these people are feeling the negative connotations of people who commit crimes under their own definition of the word jihad. When in actuality the word means to Islamic followers a personal struggle.
Conor McCloskey's comment, April 30, 2013 7:27 AM
Islamic cultural has been isolated and generalized in American society after September 11th, 2001. Because of this, the Islamic religion is often misunderstood or misrepresented. There are extremist factions of every religion, even Christian, though sometimes our culture forgets that. This video is about a Muslim organization that is trying to take back the definition of “jihad” in American society. Since 9/11, the world has been synonymous with violence, though many Muslims do not believe their struggle for a better life with God is a violent struggle.
Cultures are multilayer. While some Muslim’s believe jihad is a holy war, others see it as a personal struggle. American culture has a lot to learn about the Muslim cultures through out the world, including the differences between the extremist and non-extremist factions. Extremist factions tend to get the most press coverage and attention from outsiders because they are by name extreme. It would be interesting to see how this relationship with jihad would differ if September 11th never happened.
Zakary Pereira's comment, April 30, 2013 1:31 PM
Before seeing this video I had always thought of a Jihad as a religious war started by radical Muslims. After watching I felt bad personally that I had confused this word with something that many people hold as just a goal or a personal struggle for them. I do not know if it is because post-9/11 there was much anti-Islam and anti-muslim sentiment in the US (still are today) and that the word became a radical term in the United States, I don’t know. I agree with Conor and saying that the reason many people know Jihad as a religious war is because of the media attention that radical Islamists receive when they bomb/hurt/kill and that is hurting the image of Muslims and Jihad in America.
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Habemus papam: There is a new pope

Habemus papam: There is a new pope | APHG Nature and Perspectives, Population and Migration, Culture | Scoop.it
(3rd UPDATE) The new leader of the world's 1.2 billion Catholics is expected to deliver a speech in an hour

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Maricarmen Husson's comment, March 14, 2013 5:42 AM
I'm so happy! The first Argentine Pope!
Al Picozzi's curator insight, July 10, 2013 12:44 PM

As a Catholic I see the need for tradition in culture.  Even as culture changes, I think there is still a place for it even in today's modern, fluid culture.  Tradition gives us a base to build a culture.  Yes cultures do change, but they have to start somewhere and traditions are the place to start.  Question, where would you be without some of your traditions? what would you miss?  We all start somewhere, after I was married and had kids, we started our own family traditions, but alot of them are based on older traditions,like a huge dinner at Christmas....mmm 5 courses and an expanding wasitline :).

Al Picozzi's comment, July 10, 2013 12:46 PM
I agree, there still is a place for tradition even in modern culture. We need somewhere to start and traditions are a good place.
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Cultural Perspectives

Cultural Perspectives | APHG Nature and Perspectives, Population and Migration, Culture | Scoop.it

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Shelby Porter's curator insight, November 4, 2013 7:12 AM

This political cartoon is just another great example of how different cultures are across the globe. Here in America, we are told that the appropriate swimwear to wear to the beach only covers about a third of our body. Where as in the Middle East, wearing a burka is what they are told is the right type of clothing to wear. Whether it be for religious, cultural, or fashionable reasons, women wear all types of clothing and I don't believe it is directly due to male influence. There are many things that could cause this influence such as the church, family, or the media. Yet as the cartoon says, each woman thinks the men in that country are forcing them into wearing clothes like that and their culture is dominated by men. I guess it just shows the different perspectives each culture can have. 

megan b clement's comment, December 15, 2013 9:51 PM
This cartoon depicts the cultural differences between two different cultures. On the right you have a woman in a traditional burka that covers all but her eyes. On the left you have a woman in a bikini which is what is apropriate to wear on the beach or to bed. Two totally different societies and beliefs and they both look at one another and see the other person as inapropriate. This is not the first time another country has looked at the USA and turned their nose up to something that we do differently.
Jacqueline Landry's curator insight, December 16, 2013 3:31 PM

when I look at this the first thought that comes to mind is it is easy for other people to judge. just by there comments they have no idea what the others beliefs are,. This is a classic judging a book by it's cover. The are both assuming it has to do with a male dominating world. I think it has to do with what you are comfortable with. 

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Religion and Spirituality: God and Violence

Religion and Spirituality: God and Violence | APHG Nature and Perspectives, Population and Migration, Culture | Scoop.it
It’s the age-old “problem of evil”: If God is both loving and all-powerful, why doesn’t he prevent evil in the world? (Is there a contradiction between Christ as conquering King of kings and as Prince of Peace?
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Introduction / The Land and the People | Middle East Research and Information Project

Introduction / The Land and the People | Middle East Research and Information Project | APHG Nature and Perspectives, Population and Migration, Culture | Scoop.it
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Our Christian Earth: The astounding reach of the world’s largest religion, in charts and maps

Our Christian Earth: The astounding reach of the world’s largest religion, in charts and maps | APHG Nature and Perspectives, Population and Migration, Culture | Scoop.it
A new study from Pew shows Christianity's amazing reach and its vast majorities across several regions.
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Refugees as a Part of World Migration Patterns

Refugees as a Part of World Migration Patterns | APHG Nature and Perspectives, Population and Migration, Culture | Scoop.it

A refugee is a person who has been pushed away from their homeland and seeks refuge in another place. The United Nations High Commissioner on Refugees (UNHCR) provides a more narrow definition of a refugee as someone who flees their home country due to a “well-founded fear of being persecuted for reasons of race, religion, nationality, membership of a particular social group or political opinion.”


As Neal Lineback notes in this Geography in the News post, not all refugees are covered by this definition.  Environmental refugees have been forced to leave their homes beause of soil degradation, deserticfication, flooding, drought, climate change and other environmental factors. 


Tags: environment, environment depend, migration, unit 2 population.


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Briley Angle's comment, September 16, 2013 6:58 PM
* chance *
Blake Welborn's curator insight, November 11, 2013 7:34 PM

A map that details the countries with the highest count of refugees. This map shows the patterns of immigrants and possible areas that would be prone to conflict and refugees. 

Lauren Sellers's curator insight, May 20, 8:55 AM

This shows us how people have been pushed away from various places around the world and congregated to form large communities in other areas.

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What Is Geocaching?

Learn about the high-tech treasure hunting game being played around the world by adventure seekers! Learn more at http://www.geocaching.com Subscribe to this...

 

Geocaching is great way to get people outdoors, use geospatial technologies and have fun with the whole family. 

 

Tags: GPS, edtech, geospatial, technology, location.


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Shelby Porter's curator insight, November 4, 2013 7:56 AM

I have tried geocaching and it really does make you use geospatial tools. You have to know exactly where you are in reference to a map, you have to know directions in which you must travel, and you know you have to reach a certain place. While a fun activity, it is also a great geographic learning tool. 

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Struggle For Smarts? How Eastern And Western Cultures Tackle Learning

Struggle For Smarts? How Eastern And Western Cultures Tackle Learning | APHG Nature and Perspectives, Population and Migration, Culture | Scoop.it
For the most part in American culture, intellectual struggle in school children is seen as an indicator of weakness, while in Eastern cultures it is not only tolerated, it is often used to measure emotional strength.

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E. Erny-Newton's curator insight, March 21, 2013 6:46 AM

What is described here is what psychologist Carol Dweck highlights in her research : fixed mindset vs growth mindset ; some people tend to see achievements as based on innate abilities -they have a fixed mindset. Others see them as the fruit of effort and work -they have a growth mindset.Those two groups react very differently to setbacks : fixed minsets will give up, while growth mindsets will see an opportunity to improve.For more on that, see http://news.stanford.edu/news/2007/february7/dweck-020707.html ou en français : http://owni.fr/2011/02/07/apprendre-est-un-etat-d%E2%80%99esprit/

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, April 10, 8:06 AM

This article has a message about the view of struggling in eastern and western cultures, and how this affects learning.  As an aspiring teacher, I found this very instructive.  The examples used were good and I really find myself wanting to read more on this topic.

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 23, 11:20 AM

In this article the resources or lack there of are a huge issue for the children in these schools. It makes me think of our society and the technology and other resources that we have aviable to and dont think twice about compared to this society that has nothing. This also triggered my mind of a prospective teacher as to thinking of the differnces between learning styles in the regions.

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Catholic Demographics

Catholic Demographics | APHG Nature and Perspectives, Population and Migration, Culture | Scoop.it
Infographics showing the distribution of the Roman Catholic population in the world, where it has risen and fallen in recent years.

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Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, February 11, 9:29 AM

As the Roman Catholic population decreases in Europe, it drastically increases in Africa. However, Latin America still holds the largest population of Catholics according to the Vatican.

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, February 28, 7:33 PM

This infographic shows the changing world Catholic demographic. South America is home to by far the largest Catholic population in the world where once Europe was. Now Europe has a rapidly declining Catholic population over the past 40 years (probably due to declining religiosity and low birth rates) while Africa, particularly in DR Congo, is seeing the most rapid increase in Catholics (likely due to missionaries and converts). Interestingly, there's a growing number of Catholics in Asia, possibly due to missionaries or just migration.

Lona Pradeep Parad's curator insight, May 27, 4:37 PM

This is a distribution map, showing how Catholicism is spread throughout the world. It is a choropleth map and a bar graph on the side.

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Women's Political Rights

Women's Political Rights | APHG Nature and Perspectives, Population and Migration, Culture | Scoop.it
International Women's Day: political rights around the world mapped

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Nancy Watson's curator insight, March 15, 2013 2:19 PM

The UN Millenium Goals include gender equity and gender empowerment. The  goals are set to be achieved by 2015.

Rishi Suresh's curator insight, December 5, 2013 6:04 PM

This map is interesting because it shows several rights that were historically denied women except in modern times. Based on the information on the map, most countries only gave women these rights in the 20th century, usually within the last 50 years. This is shocking because it shows just how recently women were granted rights that men have had for millenia. In fact, Saudi Arabia and the UAE still don't grant women the right to vote in the 21st century.  In the last century, we have gone to the moon, we have created weapons that can level countries, and we have planned to go to Mars, but some people still do not have the right to choose their leaders. 

Dandavikranth Reddy's curator insight, December 5, 2013 8:02 PM

This article is about women having their political and personal rights such as freedom from oppression, abuse, and other things. Also, this article is about how people are trying to spread women's political rights throughout the world but it is just too hard. This article is on this page because it relates to how women are struggling to get their freedom while some countries have gotten it easily. This article benefits people who are motivated to help those in dire need or support, people who will continue to stand uo for these women, and people who can start a movement to end this madness once and for all. This article is related to the book Half the sky because most of the developed countries around the world have freedom for their women, but some countries are still fighting the horrors of rape, genital mutilation, prostitution, bridal and honor killings, and many more. 

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Africa Map Collection

Africa Map Collection | APHG Nature and Perspectives, Population and Migration, Culture | Scoop.it

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Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, March 19, 7:30 AM

It is always informative to look at old maps.  They show how the cartographers saw the world and how the passage of the map makers revealed the passage of settlements in this case of colonel Europeans.

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, March 25, 10:38 AM

This collection of maps are interesting as they show how mysterious the African continent was to Europeans. With deep expeditions into the continent expensive, difficult, and dangerous, central Africa remained very much a mystery into the 20th century. The Mountains of the Moon and the Mountains of Kong, the supposed sources of the Niger and Nile river, were completely fabricated guesswork which remained on maps until the 20th century. For central Africa, rather than make guesses as to the terrain, cartographers frequently left the area blank or with scant details.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 1:06 PM

Maps come in all shapes and sizes. This one shows the divisions in Africa and how its been shaped and defined since colonization.

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38 Maps You Never Knew You Needed

38 Maps You Never Knew You Needed | APHG Nature and Perspectives, Population and Migration, Culture | Scoop.it

"Some prime examples of fascinating maps." 


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Miguel Ángel Vargas's curator insight, March 3, 2013 9:03 AM

Mapas poco comunes, poco útiles, aunque curiosos.

Jordan Macpherson's comment, November 4, 2013 8:50 PM
CRAZY!
Lona Pradeep Parad's curator insight, May 27, 4:46 PM

This shows 38 maps of the world in completely different formats with different map projections and colorings. 

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Time Zones

Time Zones | APHG Nature and Perspectives, Population and Migration, Culture | Scoop.it

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 27, 2013 11:07 AM

Coordinating a meeting across time zones can be confusion logistical task and one that people rarely can do off the top of their head or consulting some resources.  It is, however, fundamentally a geographic task.  Our friends at the Global Catastrophic Risk Institute put together this collection of 5 maps (and this time zone converter) to help global collaboration.

Louis Culotta's comment, February 27, 2013 12:16 PM
good info...I use a app on my phone most of the time for this info.
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Primer on Palestine, Israel and the Arab-Israeli Conflict | Middle East Research and Information Project

Primer on Palestine, Israel and the Arab-Israeli Conflict | Middle East Research and Information Project | APHG Nature and Perspectives, Population and Migration, Culture | Scoop.it
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Humour in the steppes of Mongolia

Humour in the steppes of Mongolia | APHG Nature and Perspectives, Population and Migration, Culture | Scoop.it
I can´t stop smiling from a photo I stumbled upon on the facebook page of Nomaden (a Norwegian travel store) – I just love it! I tried to find the source of the photo, but no luck. I found it sprea...

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 18, 2013 9:39 AM

I think this is my new litmus test for potential friends.  If this picture from Mongolia doesn't bring a smile to your face, I just don't think that we can be friends.  If anyone can find the original source (or a hi-res version), I'd love to hear about it.  

chris tobin's comment, February 21, 2013 10:33 AM
Great happy photo. This is a possible National Geographgic photo
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Thomas Malthus and Population Growth

Learn more: http://www.khanacademy.org/video?v=r1ywppAJ1xs Thomas Malthus's views on population. Malthusian limits.

 

This is a succinct (but not perfect) summary of Malthusian ideas on population.  What do you think of his ideas?  Any specific parts of his theory that you agree with?  Do you disagree with some of his ideas?  What did history have to say about it?  

 

Tags: Demographics, population, models, APHG,  unit 2 population. 


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Lauren Jacquez's curator insight, October 25, 2013 8:01 PM

We will be learning about Malthus in Chapter 2.  Take a sneek peek!

Lauren Sellers's curator insight, May 20, 8:57 AM

The Malthusian ideas maintain that food growth is only linear, while population growth is geometric, so soon population will outgrow food production and famines will occur,

Lona Pradeep Parad's curator insight, May 28, 4:12 PM

This video very well explains the malthusian theory and how it is associated with population

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The Economic and Political Impact of Immigrants, Latinos and Asians State by State

The Economic and Political Impact of Immigrants, Latinos and Asians State by State | APHG Nature and Perspectives, Population and Migration, Culture | Scoop.it

Not every state is equally impacted by migration, and the demographic profile of migrants is different for every state. This is an online mapping tool to search a large database that can give the user state specific information about the impact of economics and politics based on migration from Latin America and Asia on any given state.

 

Tags: Immigration, unit 2 population, migration, economic, statistics, mapping, political.


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