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Rescooped by Erin Miller from Geography Education
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How Pandemics Spread

View Full Lesson on TED-ED BETA: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/how-pandemics-spread In our increasingly globalized world, a single infected person can board a pl...

 

This is a great demonstration of why spatial thinking is critical to so many fields, including medicine.

 

Tags: diffusion, medical, historical, spatial.


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Miles Gibson's curator insight, November 23, 2014 11:33 AM

Unit 1 nature and perspectives of geography

This video is about how a world wide pandemic can occur and has occurred in history. I thought this was interesting because it  spoke of many specific events like the black death and the 2010 cholera outbreak in haiti, gave detailed information, and was very informal.

This relates to unit 1 because it shows how pandemics and epidemics occur in a detailed way. It also shows how geography has related to epidemic outbreaks by showing disease spread maps and showing how doctors used this to solve the issue of it.

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Visualizing Regional Population Statistics

It was just over two centuries ago that the global population was 1 billion — in 1804. But better medicine and improved agriculture resulted in higher life expectancy for children, dramatically increasing the world population, especially in the West.

 

This is an excellent video for population and demographic units, but also for showing regional and spatial patterns within the global dataset (since terms like 'overpopulation' and 'carrying capacity' inherently have different meanings in distinct place and when analyzed at various scales). It is also a fantastic way to visualize population data and explain the ideas that are foundational for the Demographic Transition Model.

 

Tags: population, scale, visualization, Demographics, models, unit 2 population, sustainability, regions, spatial.


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Sarah Ann Glesenkamp's curator insight, September 17, 2014 7:55 PM

Unit 2

Mohamed Mohamed's curator insight, October 13, 2014 4:03 PM

This video describes and explains how we got to a population of 7 billion people so fast

Mohamed Mohamed's curator insight, October 13, 2014 4:04 PM

It also uses water to demonstrate it.

Rescooped by Erin Miller from Geography Education
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Designs to Fit More People in Every City

TED Talks How can we fit more people into cities without overcrowding? Kent Larson shows off folding cars, quick-change apartments and other innovations that could make the city of the future work a lot like a small village of the past.

 

This talk is relevant not just because it focuses on many urban issues; it also is a fantastic demonstration of how to use spatial thinking to solve problems.  

 

Tags:  density, urban, spatial, planning, TED. 


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Mike Carney's curator insight, September 30, 2013 5:41 PM

This TED Talk presents some very forward-thinking ideas on urban planning. With cities becoming more and more packed it is important to rethink the way we live and work in cities. Space saving technologies like the fold-up cars and small, changeable apartments seem futuristic but doable. This video challenges the viewer to think about the form and function of cities in new ways. Moving into the future it is important to adapt to the growing congestion in cities by applying new technologies with flexible designs that make cities more livable. I think that the smart apartments are an innovative solution but unlikely to catch on any time soon. I think that the folding cars are more likely to catch on because so many people already use the tiny smart cars and car-sharing services like zip-car are gaining in popularity. 

Anhony DeSimone's curator insight, December 19, 2013 8:51 AM

This video is about how we can design a city that is less crowded. What Kent Larson thinks should happen to a city is basically minimize certain aspects of the city. What that means is adding these new ideas of folding cars,quick-change apartments and other innovations that will lessen the cities population and crowdedness. 

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Indo-European Languages Originated in Anatolia, Biologists Say

Indo-European Languages Originated in Anatolia, Biologists Say | APHG EMiller | Scoop.it
Evolutionary biologists say the first speakers of what would become the Indo-European languages were probably farmers in what is now Turkey — a conclusion that differs by hundreds of miles and thousands of years from a longstanding linguistic theory.

 

This research potentially can explain much about the geography of languages and the distribution of cultural groups in Eurasia. 


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Kampe Kyle's curator insight, May 27, 2014 11:33 PM

In AP Human Geo., this relates to the concept of language, language diffusion, and philological history, as it dates all of the languages of Europe back to a unified whole in the past wherein one language in Anatolia sparked all these other languages to eventually take hold.