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The True Size Of Africa

The True Size Of Africa | APHG EMiller | Scoop.it

This is another old classic image that I might have shared earlier but it merits repeating. As Salvatore Natoli (a leader in geography education) once said, "In our society we unconsciously equate size with importance and even power." This is one reason why many people have underestimated the true size of Africa relative to places that they view as more important or more powerful.


Tags: mapping, Africa, perspective, images. 


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Ricardo Salaya Monsell's comment, November 5, 2012 1:31 PM
Although I do not think they do to "trick", it is true that confuses many people and makes them believe in a world disproportionate. (Apologies for my terrible google-English)
Laurence Cuffe's curator insight, August 1, 2013 4:46 AM

While size is not every thing, and Ireland seems to have returned to the UK, This is an image worth discusing in Class.

Afrikasources's curator insight, January 15, 10:10 AM

Just a reminder

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"Million" Cities

"Million" Cities | APHG EMiller | Scoop.it

From TD-architects Theo Deutinger Rotterdam.

 

Rome was the first city with one million residents, with that occuring in 5 BC.  Over a thousand years later, London and Beijing joined that group as industrialization became the impetus for wide-scale urbanization.  Today we are seeing an explosion of "million cities" throughout the world. 


Tags: urban, megacities, unit 7 cities.


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Seth Dixon's comment, September 21, 2012 1:51 PM
The data is from 2006, so it's a little dated, but still useful.
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The State of Women in the World

The State of Women in the World | APHG EMiller | Scoop.it

Tags: gender, development, worldwide, poverty.


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Lauren Jacquez's curator insight, February 12, 2013 1:39 PM

Gender Development index - CHapter 9 materials

Amy Marques's curator insight, July 2, 2013 11:09 AM

This is a great represenaton for showing the unfortunate truth of the state women in the world today.

Shelby Porter's curator insight, November 4, 2013 11:15 AM

Why are women so unequal to men? Why are women in the Middle East seeing such bad treatment and unequality? How can we fix these problems?

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Tour the States - Music Video

Full album: http://www.marblesthebrainstore.com/brain-beats Music by Renald Francoeur Drawing by Craighton Berman "Tour the States" is track #1 from Brain Beats, a mnemonic CD...

 

It’s so often stated that geography education is so much more than just learning states and capitals. I wholeheartedly endorse that sentiment, but there is still some rudimentary importance to learning about where places are. I see it as analogous for English majors needing to learn basic grammar. You can’t write a masterpiece if you are still fumbling around with the alphabet. In geography, we can't have a nuanced discussion of place and interconnectedness if we have no sense of where any place actually is.

 

Tags: USA, K12, video, GeographyEducation.


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Gillian & Alexis's curator insight, November 27, 2013 5:11 PM

A great, to-the-point video showing the political geography of the United States. Quick and fast facts on the 50 states and capitals made into a catchy song! Chosen for poltical geography content. TOPIC: Geography-Location

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The Cultural Geography of a Viral Sensation

The Cultural Geography of a Viral Sensation | APHG EMiller | Scoop.it
The Gangnam Style! sensation is all over the internet, complete with parodies that both honor and mock the original.  This first video is the original, which in a few short months received well ove...

 

The following link has the video, parodies and infographics to help student explore the meaning behind the cultural phenomenon. 


Questions to Ponder: Considering the concept of cultural diffusion, what do we make of this phenomenon? What cultural combinations are seen in this? How has the technological innovations changed how cultures interact, spread and are replicated?

 

Tags: popular culture, video, diffusion, globalization, culture, place, technology, unit 3 culture. 


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Rich's comment, October 3, 2012 2:27 PM
When I first saw this music video and heard the song I remember myself saying "I have no idea what is going on, but the human race is a better place thanks to this guy." I may not know what he is saying but it puts me in a great mood. This guy is breaking cultural and geographical boundaries with music.
Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, April 14, 6:07 PM

Culture and globalization has spread this song across the United States breaking records and trending on sites such as Twitter. Our exposure to different cultures is great. However, if you do not like songs that get stuck in your head, do not listen to this song . LOL

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Visualizing Regional Population Statistics

It was just over two centuries ago that the global population was 1 billion — in 1804. But better medicine and improved agriculture resulted in higher life expectancy for children, dramatically increasing the world population, especially in the West.

 

This is an excellent video for population and demographic units, but also for showing regional and spatial patterns within the global dataset (since terms like 'overpopulation' and 'carrying capacity' inherently have different meanings in distinct place and when analyzed at various scales). It is also a fantastic way to visualize population data and explain the ideas that are foundational for the Demographic Transition Model.

 

Tags: population, scale, visualization, Demographics, models, unit 2 population, sustainability, regions, spatial.


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olivia estrugo's curator insight, November 12, 2013 2:01 PM

Interesting video.

Alison Antonelli's curator insight, December 4, 2013 9:37 AM

After watching this short clip, it puts the popluation into perspective. I never knew how quickly the populaiton could grow and this video is a pure example of how it does. Over population is going to be a major problem in the future.

Denise Pacheco's curator insight, December 17, 2013 11:07 AM

Watching this video made me think how or if it's possible to have that many people on earth and still have enough food, jobs, and shelter for everyone. The carrying capacity seems way too densed. It is possible to fit a high number of people in one area year by year as long as we know how to use the space thats given to us. I dont think many countries have come up with an good logic or plans on how to sustain the overpopulated areas throught the globe. If they did, then there would be enough food, shelter, and jobs. There wouldn't be so many people unemployed, malnourished, and homeless if the government would come up with a plan.

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Immigrants wanted - But only if they ‘Slovakise’

Immigrants wanted - But only if they ‘Slovakise’ | APHG EMiller | Scoop.it

SLOVAKIA needs migrants to meet the needs of its labour market, but government officials have made it clear that Slovakia will still expect migrants to “fully integrate."  What is the different between cultural assimilation and acculturation?  Why is Slovakia maintaining this cultural stance?  How will this impact Slovak society and immigrants?  Is this a good plan? 


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Commercial from India: Population Control and 3G smartphones

What an Idea Sir ji....Alternative to Population Control :) -JAGJIT...

 

Population growth and technological developments in India.  This commercial is obviously a making light of serious issues, but does it have a point?  Can technology and infrastructural development actually have an impact on population growth?  Speculate a to why that might be.   Some more discussion on the video and topic can be found at: http://blog.foreignpolicy.com/posts/2011/09/12/indian_company_markets_cell_phones_as_birth_control


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Vanuatu: Meet The Natives

"Five men from the remote Pacific island of Tanna arrive in America to experience western culture for the first time, and force us to look at ourselves through brand new eyes..."

 

This cross-cultural experiment reinforces numerous stereotypes, but also seeks to get viewers to look at issues from a variety of perspectives.  Folk cultures, modernization and globalization are all major themes of this show.     


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Caleb Gard's curator insight, December 12, 2013 10:15 PM

These five men that were from the Pacific Island of Tanna go to America to get an experience for themselves of western culture for the first time. They travel many miles to find out for themselves what our culture was like. In doing this they brought over their own culture into America, making this a great expierience for themselves and those that they came in contact with on their journey. When these men came from Tanna to America to experience the cultural difference between the two places. Some long term effects of this experience is that the men might bring American cultures into their tribe, and they most likley had brought their cultures over here with the people that they came in contact with. Over all this excurssion will help the people cominig on contact with it learn about others cultural defferences from their own.

Paige McClatchy's curator insight, December 14, 2013 6:14 PM

This promotion for the series "Meet the Natives" is a laughable cross-cultural experiment in forced globalization. While there are many political and cultural problems with this video, perhaps the Vanuatu people are less isolated and exotic than we really think. It's naive to think they are totally backward with no interest in connecting with the world.

Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, April 23, 6:46 PM

It is amazing to see travels of Pacific Islanders to America and their brief takes on their journey. Usually it is the other way around with the Americans telling the stories. These pacific islanders are greeted by their friends upon their arrival home and talk about how they met so many great people.

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Social construction of gender: Dr. Pepper TEN commercial

This is about as overtly hyper-masculine (and not surprisingly misogynistic) a commercial as you can get.  It is also useful tool to explain the social construction of gender within cultures.  How are they constructing 'masculine' in this commercial?  Conversely, how do they separate this imagined masculine from 'feminine?'  How do we know within the context our culture, what is acceptable for men (or women)?    


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Spanish song--Globalization

This song shows many of the strange cultural, economic and political situations that we can see today, mainly because of globalization.

 

For the lyrics to this song (in Spanish), see: http://www.quedeletras.com/letra-cancion-disneylandia-bajar-63741/disco-12-segundos-de-oscuridad/jorge-drexler-disneylandia.html


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Religious Pilgrimage: the Hajj

Religious Pilgrimage: the Hajj | APHG EMiller | Scoop.it

This is a beautiful photoessay of the Hajj, with excellent captions that shows many of the cultural customs that are associated with the massive pilgrimage.  The tremendous influx of tourists/pilgrims into the Mecca area, there is a huge economic industry that supports and depends on the tourists.  For a BBC article about the market impacts of the Hajj, see: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-middle-east-11777483


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Elizabeth Allen's comment, December 6, 2012 11:21 PM
The photos show what an immense congregation this event really is. If a picture is worth a thoudsand words, than this collection is a jackpot. The colors are captivating, green costumes of participants in the military parade, the hands holding the beads for sale. In the article from bbc.co.uk it is interesting to learn that such a religious event is an opportunity for economic gains. From merchants selling beads and rugs to visitors all the way to hotels capitalizing on the religious pilgrimage. It is amazing to know that every Muslim should make this trip as long as he/she is healthy and can afford to.
Crissy Borton's curator insight, December 11, 2012 8:55 PM

These photo’s are amazing! Number 12 with the crowd of people and the ambulance in the middle shows the massive amount of people. Their heads look like dots in a sea of white. These pictures show what words just cannot describe. 

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Nina Jablonski breaks the illusion of skin color

Nina Jablonski says that differing skin colors are simply our bodies' adaptation to varied climates and levels of UV exposure. Charles Darwin disagreed with ...

 

This insightful TED video explains the biological and geographic reasons for the evolution of skin pigmentations.  Nina Jablonski says that differing skin colors are simply our bodies' adaptation to varied climates and levels of UV exposure. See the TED-ED lessons for this video at: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/nina-jablonski-breaks-the-illusion-of-skin-color


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How future urban sprawl maps out

How future urban sprawl maps out | APHG EMiller | Scoop.it
Projections of urban growth indicate areas where biodiversity is at high risk.

 

The AAG Smart Brief is a fantastic source of geographic news.  This is what they said about this article:  "Areas such as tropical Africa and eastern China are expected to be hot spots of urbanization during the next several years, according to researchers, who used satellite imagery and other data to project future urban expansion through 2030. 'We're not forecasting population, we're forecasting the expansion of urban space,' said Yale University geographer Karen Seto. Their efforts could be used to assist conservation initiatives, Seto noted."

 

Tags: AAG, urban, sprawl, land use, urban ecology, biogeography, unit 7 cities, environment.


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Lauren Fiedler's comment, July 24, 2013 7:56 AM
This article is about urban growth and decline, Africa and Asia are predicted to be hot spots of urban growth in the next few years. Geographer Karen Seto of Yale University in New Haven has creted a graph that finally accounts for variations in how individual cities occupy their land and the impact they have on local ecosystems.
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The New World

The New World | APHG EMiller | Scoop.it
An interactive series of maps show possible new additions to the world’s list of independent nations.

 

This is great way to show examples of devolution and political instability.  Included are 11 potential scenarios where further fragmentation/disintegration might occur or even greater regional integration that would redraw the map.  These case studies include: Somalia, Korea, Azerbaijan, Belgium and the Arabian Gulf Union.

 

Tags: political, devolution, supranationalism, war, autonomy, unit 4 political.


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Benjamin DeRita's comment, September 23, 2012 9:36 PM
Very interesting and informative piece, I found slide (10) especially intriguing with its discussion on the possibility of China claiming parts of Siberia.
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Exclusive Economic Zones

Exclusive Economic Zones | APHG EMiller | Scoop.it

Today, a country’s marine economic area is defined by its Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ), a 200-nautical mile-wide (370 km) strip of sea along the country’s national coast line (hi-res image). This regulation, which was installed by the ‘UN Convention on the Law of the Sea’ in 1982, grants a state special rights to exploit natural (such as oil) and marine (for instance fish) resources, including scientific research and energy production (wind-parks, for example).

 

Questions to ponder: how does this series of buffer zones around the Earth's land masses impact politics, the environment and local economies?  Where might the EEZs be more important to the success of a country/territory than other regions? 

 

Tags:  economic, environment, political, resources, water, sovereignty, coastal, environment depend, territoriality, states, conflict, unit 4 political.  


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What If Rich Countries Shut the Door on Immigration?

What If Rich Countries Shut the Door on Immigration? | APHG EMiller | Scoop.it
Ian Goldin, Director of the Oxford Martin School, warns that a backlash against immigration would wreak havoc on everything from hospitals to the high-tech industry. The interview is part of the Risk Response Network’s “What if?

 

This is article can be an intriguing introduction to a thought exercise geared towards understanding the economic impact of migration and the social processes that create our world. 

 

Questions to ponder:  Which points of the interviewee do you agree with?  Are there some that you think his analysis is off-base?  What do you think the impacts on a given location would be if there was no migration allowed? 

 

Tags:  migration, economic, unit 2 population, immigration, unit 6 industry, labor.


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What Is Geocaching?

Learn about the high-tech treasure hunting game being played around the world by adventure seekers! Learn more at http://www.geocaching.com Subscribe to this...

 

Geocaching is great way to get people outdoors, use geospatial technologies and have fun with the whole family. 

 

Tags: GPS, edtech, geospatial, technology, location.


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Shelby Porter's curator insight, November 4, 2013 10:56 AM

I have tried geocaching and it really does make you use geospatial tools. You have to know exactly where you are in reference to a map, you have to know directions in which you must travel, and you know you have to reach a certain place. While a fun activity, it is also a great geographic learning tool. 

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China's village of the bachelors: no wives in sight in remote settlement

China's village of the bachelors: no wives in sight in remote settlement | APHG EMiller | Scoop.it
Surplus of males caused by preference for sons means poor subsistence farmers have no chance of finding a mate...

 

One-child policy, gender preference, rural-urban divide in modernizing China...the list of applications goes on. 


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Liam Michelsohn's curator insight, October 21, 2013 7:33 PM

I don’t understand how China could kill Chinese girl’s baby’s and not see 20 years down the road how that would affect there country. Even if it’s the family doing it because the boys can work and help the family eat, the government should have created job opportunities for girls motivating the poorer families to raise there children equally.  Maybe they wanted to thin overpopulation in china so they skipped a generation, it seems horrible but empires have done terrible things in history to maintain power.

Kenny Dominguez's curator insight, November 20, 2013 6:23 PM


This was going to happen anyways because china having that one child rule was going to imbalance the population more males less females. Those rules being in place family members were forced to have boys because they would be the one to take over and inherent the land its parents left them. If they would have a girl they that land will go to the husbands family and plus boys would be the favorite child because they can work much faster than what a girl would. That being said the girls would be given up or killed. Now china has millions of males and little females. Which makes it difficult for the males to get married and have children of their own.

The ratio to males to females is six to one talk about crazy. But now that china has allowed a family to have two children instead of one. Now over the years we will see and increase in females and as well as males because of the imbalance of the country. But china allowing to have more than one kid will come at a price because

that is more people they have to maintain and china already being overpopulated will make it even worse for them.

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Do Parents Put Too Much Pressure on Students?

Do Parents Put Too Much Pressure on Students? | APHG EMiller | Scoop.it
Survey results show that Americans are the most likely to say parents should pressure children more about studies, and Chinese are most likely to say they should do so less.

 

Culture isn't just one aspect of society, but one that often cut to the core of social interactions and institutions.  Granted these are opinions that each society has about itself, so we'll take the numbers with a grain of salt.  How is education, parental roles and student expectations are a part of culture?  How (and why) do these factors change from palce to place?


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NYTimes: Our Amish, Ourselves

NYTimes: Our Amish, Ourselves | APHG EMiller | Scoop.it
Many Americans will continue to see the Amish as a backward cult, but many more will persist in mythologizing them, seeing in them what they need to see.

 

Folk cultures and popular cultures have different underriding core values.  Why do some seek to point or the problems with Amish society, while other wish to romanticize it?   


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Body Ritual of the Nacirema

Body Ritual of the Nacirema | APHG EMiller | Scoop.it

Written by Harold Miner, the Body Ritual of the Nacirema was written in part to parallel an early 20th century cultural anthropology report on a culture this can be used to discuss culture and different perspectives of culture groups.  This could be very fun, especially waiting to see when the "aha" moment comes and they understand just who the Nacirema are (the SPOILER will be embedded in the comment section).  It is lengthy and written as academic paper, so for K-12 use, I'd recommend using snippets and having them work in groups to analyze the seemingly bizarre cultural rituals of the Nacirema.  


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Seth Dixon's comment, November 11, 2011 2:17 PM
**SPOILER ALERT** The NACERIMA are is modern American society (American spelled backwards). This little bit of information drastically changes the reading.
Seth Dixon's comment, November 14, 2011 4:05 PM
The "Nacirema" are "American" spelled backwards (or interpreted backwards).
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Gullah Culture in Danger of Fading Away

Gullah Culture in Danger of Fading Away | APHG EMiller | Scoop.it
Time has stood still on the tiny rural island of St. Helena, South Carolina. And the people who live there, descendants of West African slaves who call themselves "Gullahs," want to keep it that way.

 

Diffusion, language, cultural syncretism, folk culture and globalization are themes that can all be taught using this old National Geographic article on Gullah culture.  


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Sinclair Tucker's comment, January 30, 2012 2:20 PM
this is quite interesting due to the fact that i grew up in West Africa, both Liberia, Ghana and Nigeria. Sierra Leone is my hometown neighbor which is Liberia. The slaves from Sierra Leone who now reside in south carolina still have their traditional ways. They eat okra and several other grains, with a lot of sea food because their hometown Sierra Leone is located on the west coast of africa.
elsa hunziker's comment, January 30, 2012 2:31 PM
"Culture is a dynamic phenomenon. There is no such thing as it remaining constant anywhere in the world," said Beverly John, a sociologist and executive assistant to the president at Chicago State University. "People often say, 'Show me the Gullah culture.' But culture comes from within. It isn't openly practiced. Therefore, the Gullah culture will survive." ...Wow!
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Hambone Kneeslap

This amazing Hambone performance by Samuel Hicks starts out at a normal pace and then increases in tempo to a blazing finish. Shot in North Carolina back in ...

 

Folk cultural traits being distributed by popular culture technologies. 


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Cheerleading goes native in India

Cheerleading goes native in India | APHG EMiller | Scoop.it
In season five of cricket's Indian Premier League, the teams' Western-style cheerleaders are taking on a decidedly Indian look, reports Shamik Bag.

 

What happens when westernized cheerleading arrives in India's massively popular cricket sporting events?  After a backlash against the cheerleaders, they culturally reinvented the practice and made it their own, in a fusion of global and traditional cultural practices. 


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