APHG EMiller
Follow
Find
250 views | +0 today
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Erin Miller from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

The Burgess and Hoyt Models

The Burgess and Hoyt Models | APHG EMiller | Scoop.it

It is possible in many cities to identify zones with a particular type of land use - eg a residential zone. Often these zones have developed due to a combination of economic and social factors. In some cases planners may have tried to separate out some land uses, eg an airport is separated from a large housing estate.

 

The concentric and sector models in one news article?  The BBC is showing once again the possibilities available if only the United States taught more geography in the schools. 

 

Tags: urban, models, unit 7 cities, APHG.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Sally Egan's curator insight, June 25, 2013 7:50 PM

Useful to develop understanding of the models of urban landuse zones within cities.

Rescooped by Erin Miller from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Jodhpur - India's Blue City

Jodhpur - India's Blue City | APHG EMiller | Scoop.it

DB: The aesthetics of architecture within a society not only reveal the communities interpretation of what is considered beautiful or pleasing in appearance but also differentiates between what is considered sacred or important. The symbolic significance of aesthetics in colors, designs and a place of residence can be indicative of socioeconomic standing is within society and what the community values.  Jodhpur, India is well known for the beautiful wave of blue houses that dominate the landscape of a rather dry region. However, it is believed that these blue houses originally were the result of ancient caste traditions. 

 

Brahmins (who were at the very top of the caste system) housed themselves in these “Brahmin Blue” homes to distinguish themselves from the members of other castes. Now that the Indian government officially prohibits the caste system, the use of the color blue has become more widespread. Yet Jodhpur is one of the only cities in India that stands steadfast to its widespread aesthetics obsession with the color blue which is making it increasingly unique, creating a new sense of communal solidarity among its residence.

 

Questions to Consider: How has color influenced the cultural geography of this area?  How are the aesthetics of this community symbolic of India’s traditional past, present and possible future?

 

Tags: South Asia, culture, housing, landscape, unit 3 culture.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
ctoler geo 152's curator insight, July 22, 2:10 AM

never knew this city existed. Blue City!

Rescooped by Erin Miller from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Where Does the South Begin?

Where Does the South Begin? | APHG EMiller | Scoop.it
Roads? Religion? Accent? Food? Which factor dictates where the North ends?

 

This is a great intellectual expercise to help student think about regions and how we define them.  The article can help also inform some of their thinking since one of the main problems for students in drawing regional boundaries is a lack of place-based knowledge.   

 

Tags: regions, USA.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, October 12, 2013 6:49 PM

Borders... the first thing I think of was a giant bookstore near my hometown... it now ceases to exist, having been replaced by Barnes and Nobel...  As for the political organization of space, I could apply this situation and laugh.  Borders will cease to be, and they will be called after people's last names!  I think this has already happened, when people unite together in countries such as the USA- although borders are specific, the general federal laws and many policies still apply in all states... generally. And people's names are often the namesakes of places.  I don't like the idea of borders, though, it seems like a bunch of warmongers trying to get ahead in a world where they can't truly cheat death, so they cheat other people of land that may have been decreed in ancient documents as property of their ancestors, or even in accordance with the righteousness of the universe and what should be alloted to whom.  Ownership is a concept of denial, because no one can truly own anything, not even our bodies, which contain trillions of infinite universes the size of the large one around us that we commonly refer to.  Borders are relative, and will likely become recognized as obsolete.  I know this was abstract, but it's my thoughts on the topic.

Rescooped by Erin Miller from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Los Angeles Walking Tour

Los Angeles Walking Tour | APHG EMiller | Scoop.it

"This map-based site contains hundreds of images of downtown Los Angeles, Displaying its tremendous architectural, cultural, and economic diversity. Maps of seven downtown subregions are accessible either by clicking on this map or on the list of subregion names to the left. Each regional map provides access to specific places in downtown in the same way."


This is a great example of a neighborhood project than shows the economic and cultural differences between places. 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Erin Miller from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

How Pandemics Spread

View Full Lesson on TED-ED BETA: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/how-pandemics-spread In our increasingly globalized world, a single infected person can board a pl...

 

This is a great demonstration of why spatial thinking is critical to so many fields, including medicine.

 

Tags: diffusion, medical, historical, spatial.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Erin Miller from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Timelapse of Route 66

USA Route 66 Cross Country Road Trip Map, Data, Summary, Photos, Equipment Used: http://www.defreesproductions.com/road-trip-route-66-cross-country-usa-2012 ...

 

I saw this video on an Atlantic Cities article and was struck by the rural and "off-the-beaten path" feel that timelapse of the Mother Road manages to capture.  Route 66 looms large in Americana, in part because it represents a bygone era, a time when the automobile was new and exciting. This empowered many to make a cross-country road trip, but during this time the car was not so ubiquitous that it was the overwhelming force that is so visually prominent in urban landscapes as it is today.  The historical and cultural critique of the U.S. automobile culture in the Pixar movie Cars may be fictional and for a child audience, but it is quite accurate in noting that cities disconnected from the interstate system sharply declined and were never the same.  These places represent for many people then, a classic pop culture landscape of yesteryear.  

 

Tags: transportation, landscape, place, culture, timelapse.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Jon Meyerjon's curator insight, November 6, 2013 8:13 AM

The Route 66 trip in 3 min. Wow! Great work.

Rescooped by Erin Miller from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Designs to Fit More People in Every City

TED Talks How can we fit more people into cities without overcrowding? Kent Larson shows off folding cars, quick-change apartments and other innovations that could make the city of the future work a lot like a small village of the past.

 

This talk is relevant not just because it focuses on many urban issues; it also is a fantastic demonstration of how to use spatial thinking to solve problems.  

 

Tags:  density, urban, spatial, planning, TED. 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Mike Carney's curator insight, September 30, 2013 5:41 PM

This TED Talk presents some very forward-thinking ideas on urban planning. With cities becoming more and more packed it is important to rethink the way we live and work in cities. Space saving technologies like the fold-up cars and small, changeable apartments seem futuristic but doable. This video challenges the viewer to think about the form and function of cities in new ways. Moving into the future it is important to adapt to the growing congestion in cities by applying new technologies with flexible designs that make cities more livable. I think that the smart apartments are an innovative solution but unlikely to catch on any time soon. I think that the folding cars are more likely to catch on because so many people already use the tiny smart cars and car-sharing services like zip-car are gaining in popularity. 

Anhony DeSimone's curator insight, December 19, 2013 8:51 AM

This video is about how we can design a city that is less crowded. What Kent Larson thinks should happen to a city is basically minimize certain aspects of the city. What that means is adding these new ideas of folding cars,quick-change apartments and other innovations that will lessen the cities population and crowdedness. 

Rescooped by Erin Miller from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Guerrilla Cartographers Put Global Food Stats On The Map

Guerrilla Cartographers Put Global Food Stats On The Map | APHG EMiller | Scoop.it
The mapmakers have amassed some 80 maps for Food: An Atlas, ranging from surplus in Northeast Italy to meat production in Maryland. The goal is to spread information about various food systems so they can be adapted locally.

 

Social media is enhancing digital cooperation to enable some intriguing grass-roots projects such as this one. 

 

Tags: food, agriculture, mapping.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Erin Miller from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Israel and Palestine

Watch this Jewish Voice for Peace 6 minute mini-primer about why Israelis and Palestinians are fighting..

This video from the Jewish Voice for Peace has a more politically motivated angle than most of the resources that I post on this site, but I feel that they do justice to both sides as well as the truth. In a simple way it lays out the roots of many of the problems in the region with historic and geographic perspectives.

Tags: Israel, Palestine, conflict, political, borders.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's comment, November 29, 2012 9:51 PM
I must admit, I did struggle on whether to post it or not. In the video the use of term 'indigenous people' to refer to the Palestinians bothered me as did a few other references, but I did feel it tried to be accurate even if their political perspective was obvious.
I would most certainly be open to posting something more pro-Israeli since I'm not trying to advocate a particular point or push a perspective, but I did think it was a good, is somewhat flawed resource. It's near impossible to find anything without bias so I decided that sharing some flawed sources is better than not sharing any on a pretty weighty topic.
Dawn Haas Tache's curator insight, January 8, 2013 1:16 PM

This video from the Jewish Voice for Peace has a more politically motivated angle than most of the resources that I post on this site, but I feel that they do justice to both sides as well as the truth.  In a simple way it lays out the roots of many of the problems in the region with historic and geographic perspectives.   

 

Tags: Israel, Palestine, conflict, political, borders.

Maegan Connor's curator insight, December 17, 2013 7:34 PM

This video is a really helpful, simplified explanation of the fighting in Israel that is fiercely complicated and has gone on for decades now with one repressed group repressing another. If I ever need to explain the struggle to students, this video would be an excellent introduction.

Rescooped by Erin Miller from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

McDonald's Goes Vegetarian — In India

McDonald's Goes Vegetarian — In India | APHG EMiller | Scoop.it
McDonald's plans to open the first in a series of all-vegetarian restaurants in India next year. But rest assured, in most locations around the world, meat will stay on the menu.

 

Many of the most successful global companies or brands use highly regional variations that are attuned to local cultural norms and customs.  The McAloo Tikki burger— which uses a spicy, fried potato-based patty — is the Indian McDonald's top seller.

 

Questions to ponder: What are the forces that lead towards an accelaration of human connectivity around the globe?  What are the postive impacts of this increased connectivity?  What are some negative impacts?  Are these impacts the same in all places?  Explain. 

 

Tags: Globalization, food, culture, unit 3 culture and SouthAsia.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, April 14, 11:21 PM

I believe this is a wise decision by McDonald's to adjust their menu for the people of India who are vegetarian. India's population is over one billion now; many of those people are vegetarian. McDonald's is one of the world's most successful fast food chains and they have a chance to lure millions of new customers into their restaurant. This is a great example of a global company making small changes in order to attract people with specific customs and cultural norms. 

Paige Therien's curator insight, April 24, 12:49 PM

When one thinks about huge brands like McDonalds, very specific food items may come to mind.  These items, like the Big Mac in the United States and other select countries, are very iconic in terms of representation to its consumers and competitors.  However, traveling to a different country would expose one to the fact that the cuisine at a restaurant owned by the same company may be quite different.  McDonalds is a master at globalization because they have created a huge reputation and have a lot of power in the global market.  At the same time, they have tuned in to the local cultures and their values and traditions.  In places like India, this is very neccesary if McDonalds is to maintain a strong market there because a large portion of the population is vegetarian.  Not only would they not enjoy eating a Big Mac, they may be insulted by its presence on the menu and feel generally ignored by the company in terms of their traditions and beliefs.

Tracy Galvin's curator insight, April 29, 6:20 PM

I am impressed that McDonald's knows their clientele so well! This is a company that will last since it is very globally conscious and therefore can open a restaurant in any country.

Rescooped by Erin Miller from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

The Separatist Map of Africa

The Separatist Map of Africa | APHG EMiller | Scoop.it
When African states gained independence, the continent's new leaders agreed to respect the old colonial borders to avoid endless wars.

 

This interactive map shows the major conflicts on the African continent where the combatants have geopolitical aspirations to separate from the state and create a new, autonomous state.  Click on the red arrows and you can read about the warring factions and the current situation in that region.   

 

Tags: political, governance, Africa, unit 4 political, war, conflict, states, colonialism.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Kristen McDaniel's curator insight, January 4, 2013 10:15 AM

Fascinating interactive map looking at the separatist movements in Africa.  

Cynthia Williams's curator insight, July 3, 2013 2:00 PM

It seems as though African countries are actually trying to go back to their pre-colonial boundaries. The agreement they made to respect the old colonial borders to avoid war has never been effective.

Arya Okten's curator insight, March 27, 11:48 PM

Unit IV - Non American

Rescooped by Erin Miller from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Interactive: Mapping the World's Friendships

Interactive: Mapping the World's Friendships | APHG EMiller | Scoop.it
Technology bridges distance and borders. Individuals today can keep in touch with their friends and family in completely new ways — regardless of where they live. We explored these internatio...

 

People can be digitally connected with anyone around the world these days, without any limitations by distance or culture.  Yet, by analyzing peoples social networks, it is clear that geographic factors are still a crucial factor in mediating our scoial interactions.  The internet can, but doesn't fully conquer space.    

Tags: socialmedia, worldwide, mapping. 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 23, 2013 4:08 PM

People can be digitally connected with anyone around the world these days, without any limitations by distance or culture.  Yet, by analyzing peoples social networks, it is clear that geographic factors are still a crucial factor in mediating our scoial interactions.  The internet can, but doesn't fully conquer space.    


Tags: socialmedia, worldwide, mapping.

Rescooped by Erin Miller from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

What Would Happen If The Entire World Lived Like Americans?

What Would Happen If The Entire World Lived Like Americans? | APHG EMiller | Scoop.it

After making an infographic depicting how much space would be needed to house the entire world’s population based on the densities of various global cities, Tim De Chant of Per Square Mile got to thinking about the land resources it takes to support those same cities.


Tags: consumption, development, resources, energy, density, sustainability.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Michelle Carvajal's comment, September 18, 2012 6:23 PM
Its very interesting that the United Arab Emirates would need more land mass than lets say China and the US. I guess what I'm trying to say is that the common misconception of people is that China has the greatest population. I definetely will rescoop this because people could actually see how hard it must be to house people who in essence would need all this land mass to live comfortably.
Thomas D's comment, April 22, 2013 4:13 PM
I thought that this was a very interesting graph and article to read. It shows that if the rest of the world lived like us Americans we would need four times the world’s surface, which is pretty substantial to think about. Although the United Arab Emirates is the leading this graph it’s hard to believe that America is in second. This goes to show that our way of living is out of hand, that the only reason we haven’t consumed everything is because the rest of the world is living of more reasonable amounts of resources or no resources at all. That we need to be as a country more conservative of our resources before we have to rely even more heavily than we already do on other countries. I was surprised to see that India has such a small percentage of resource consummation considering it is such a highly populated country.
Brianna Simao's comment, April 30, 2013 10:23 PM
Countries with a more advanced and urbanized way of life clearly would need more space to survive but if everyone lived like these more developed countries then natural selection dies and survival of the fittest takes over. Eventually all the natural resources would be used up. If they all continued to use the same amount and reproduce then the fertility rate would rapidly increase making the area overpopulated and the quality of life decreased. It is a good thing the entire world lives differently and has a diverse ecological footprint because it creates a balance in the world. As one country’s consumption is out of control another is holding down the fort because they lice more reasonably. It is interesting to see that even though China and India have the largest populations they don’t consume as many resources as the United States and the United Arab Emirates.
Rescooped by Erin Miller from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

The Corner Where Afghanistan, Iran and Pakistan Meet

The Corner Where Afghanistan, Iran and Pakistan Meet | APHG EMiller | Scoop.it
In the dusty triangle where Afghanistan, Iran and Pakistan meet, there is more than one war going on.

 

Geopolitically, there is a fascinating confluence of competing interests at this border.  This is "the scariest little corner of the world." It's a dangerous place that is often beyond the authority of any of state.  It also represents (depending on how you divide the world up) at the intersection of the three major regions in the area: Central Asia, the Middle East and South Asia.      

 

Tags: Afghanistan, political, borders, MiddleEast, SouthAsia, Central Asia, unit 4 political.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Meagan Harpin's curator insight, October 15, 2013 9:35 PM

This is a dangerous place with no authority. This area is filled with fighting, bombing and constant war. But this area is also an important intersection for three major regions Central Asia, Middle East, and South Asia. 

Cam E's curator insight, March 4, 11:35 AM

A meeting of different worlds at a border. I can't imagine the things one would see or hear living or growing up on a border of conflict such as this. Refugees are a common site, and no authority can dominate the others, making the area effectively lawless.

Rescooped by Erin Miller from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

The British have invaded 9 out of 10 countries

The British have invaded 9 out of 10 countries | APHG EMiller | Scoop.it
Britain has invaded all but 22 countries in the world in its long and colourful history, new research has found.

 

This is a great map to show the historical impact of colonialism on the world map.  The map is based on the work in the new book All the Countries We've Ever Invaded: And the Few We Never Got Round To.   

 

Tags: book reviews, colonialism, war, historical, UK. 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Don Brown Jr's comment, November 5, 2012 1:22 PM
Military conflict is often at times overlooked at as a source of language diffusion however the information displayed in this article can help explain how English has become one of the most popular languages in the world today.
Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, October 12, 2013 7:33 PM

The British have done this in reality, in the physical world, in space and time... but perhaps the Chinese have done this in our minds!  Everything our country trades for has parts made in China.  We simply can't live without these things that may be invented in the US, and designed in the US, but assembled in China.... China has a name for itself, and they're playing a game of Monopoly.  They have hotels on Board walk and Park place, and they're eating us alive... I've conferred with politicians, who say that they're on the verge of turning their hidden empire into a physical one, and going from simple monetary domination to war.  They outnumber the US, and have better technology, and evidently more skill and products.  Not much to say about that, but if they learn from the mistakes of the British, the Chinese could really create a truly elite empire that could outlast any other in human history...  But really, if they include American/Chinese cuisine in their menu, I'm sold at General Tao's chicken... Go China! 

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, March 17, 8:36 PM

This map illustrates just how wide-reaching the British Empire was throughout its history. Though the map cheats a little by including the activities of sanctioned pirates and minor invasions, almost the whole world excepting several very small nations and some difficult to reach inland ones.

 

The most surprising was Sweden considering the proximity and the frequent viking invasions on the British isles which were apparently never reciprocated.

 

Scooped by Erin Miller
Scoop.it!

Inside Mecca

For over 1400 years, Mecca has been one of the most important cities in the Arabian Peninsula. By the middle of the 6th century, there were three major settl...

 

As the heart of Islam, Mecca brings in pilgrims from around the world.  This documentary gives a great overview of the historical, spiritual and cultural reasons why this is sacred space to over one billion Muslims.  Additionally, this documentary contains an analysis of the logistics that are a part of the Hajj.  

 

Tags: Islam, tourism, place, transportation, religion, Middle East, culture. 

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Erin Miller from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Redistricting Results

Redistricting Results | APHG EMiller | Scoop.it

While this cartoon is flippant, the attached Washington Post article is not.  In the culumative congressional voting, Democrats have more votes but won fewer seats than the Republicans.  Many are starting to question the redistricting process after the 2010 census. 

  

Tags: gerrymandering, political, mapping, census.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Erin Miller from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Africa for Norway

Africa for Norway | APHG EMiller | Scoop.it

This website is an incredibly humorous parody of Eurocentric charitable organizations that, while well-intentioned, propogate many negative stereotypes about Africa. 

    

Questions to Ponder: What do you think the 'point' of Radi-Aid is?  Do you agree with their point?  How does the media influence our idea of places?   

 

Tags: Africa, development, NGOs, Norway.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Rebecca Farrea's curator insight, November 8, 2013 10:12 AM

When I saw this video in class I was confused at first.  I now understand it to be a parody that pokes fun at Eurocentric charities that have good intentions but often undermine places such as Africa.  Yes, Africa faces poverty and there are many charities to help support African countries, but the leaders of these charities must realize that Africa cannot exclusively be based on this one idea of poverty.  I agree with the point of "Radi-Aid", that the African story is much more positive than what the Eurocentric world makes of it.  Media always has the ability to influence our ideas about places.  We see one commerical about a charitable organization trying to help Africa and the first thing we think of is how impoverished Africans are.  Media exposes us to so many stereotypes which may not all be untrue, but incomplete.

Rescooped by Erin Miller from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Israeli/Palestinian Conflict

With a simple class hashtag (e.g.-#geog400ric) you can create a backchannel for student to collaborate outside the classroom walls. 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Erin Miller from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Global food crisis

Global food crisis | APHG EMiller | Scoop.it
Climate change, changing diets and a growing global population has pushed food security to the top of the international agenda.

 

Food problems are fundamentally geographic.  Understanding local economics, agriculture and development all play a critical role in contextualizing place-based shortages.  This interactive media guide highlights where these issues are the most problematic. 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Mr Ortloff's curator insight, October 10, 2013 12:39 PM

Neo-Malthusian point of view?

Rescooped by Erin Miller from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

The Geography of a Pencil

A film from the Competitive Enterprise Institute, adapted from the 1958 essay by Leonard E. Read.

 

This year's Geography Awareness Week's theme was "Declare Your Interdependence!"  The GAW poster for 2012 focused on the Geography of a Pencil and this video works together nicely as a supplement to that poster.  You may see the economics of capitalism and globalization in a less optimistic light than Leonard Read, but the theme of interconnectedness makes this a great resource. 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 17, 2013 4:17 PM

This year's Geography Awareness Week's theme was "Declare Your Interdependence!"  The GAW poster for 2012 focused on the Geography of a Pencil and this video works together nicely as a supplement to that poster.  You may see the economics of capitalism and globalization in a less optimistic light than Leonard Read, but the theme of interconnectedness makes this a great resource.

Rescooped by Erin Miller from IB Geography STCC - Paper 1 other resources
Scoop.it!

The largest migration in history: China's migrant workers

Migration from inland villages to coastal cities has transformed China. Now that is changing, as regional cities inland become the new focus of migration pat...

Via Mary Robinson
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Erin Miller from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Why Map Projections Matter

This is a clip from the TV show West Wing (Season 2-Episode 16) where cartography plays a key role in the plot.  In this episode the fictitious (but still on Facebook) group named "the Organization of Cartographers for Social Justice" is campaigning to have the President officially endorse the Gall-Peters Projection in schools and denounce the Mercator projection.  The argument being that children will grow up thinking some places are not as important because they are minimized by the map projection.  While a bit comical, the cartographic debate is quite informative even if it was designed to appear as though the issue was trivial. 

 

Questions to Ponder:  Why do map projections matter?  Is one global map projection inherently better than the rest?  

 

Tags: Mapping, geospatial, video, visualization. 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Lydia Blevins's comment, September 13, 2012 6:17 AM
I think it is very important that we start using more accurate maps. In school, the maps we use are so different from how the world actually is. I agree that children will grow up thinking some places are less important because they are minimized by the map projection.
Greg Atkinson's comment, October 10, 2012 12:31 PM
Great clip. I use it in my WRG class as a comedic introduction to the power of projection.
Mary Patrick Schoettinger's curator insight, December 18, 2012 3:01 PM

This absolutely the best video clip for SS teachers EVER!

Rescooped by Erin Miller from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

England, Britain and the UK

England, Britain and the UK | APHG EMiller | Scoop.it

This is the short version of the differences between these interrelated places and terms; the long version is much more complicated than this. 

 

Tags: Europe, political, unit 4 political, states, toponyms.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Ally Clark/Mayse Thao's curator insight, February 7, 11:09 AM

This is kinda like the video we watched where that guy who talks fast explained the uk. Oh and this is political

Rescooped by Erin Miller from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Seeds of A Revolution » 21st Century African Land Rush

Seeds of A Revolution » 21st Century African Land Rush | APHG EMiller | Scoop.it

Interesting map about farming land lending to other countries in Africa. Impossible to find the original source, but is attricuted to the Financial Times. 

 

Here is a link to the image (in low res) without political content (UN related): http://new.uneca.org/lpi/africanlandrush.aspx ;

 

Tags: Africa, agriculture, unit 5 agriculture.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.