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Socket map of the world

Socket map of the world | APHG EMiller | Scoop.it
Tags: cartography, technology, globalization, historical, regions, mapping, colonialism.
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, December 17, 2012 3:57 PM

This map might appear to be completely trivial and it probably is.  Still, there are interesting historical and colonial patterns that can be seen in this technological culture region map. 


Questions to Ponder: Will there one day be a single format?  When?  What are barrier to that happening?  What does this tell us about the extent of globalization?

Mr Ortloff's curator insight, July 23, 2013 4:01 PM

You can map ANYTHING!!!

Justin McCullough's curator insight, December 12, 2013 1:36 PM

This map is interesting because it shows where the former British Empire had its influences , especially in British-Africa territories. The only four countries that use the light blue are all in the southern hemisphere as the article points out, and the American model can be largely seen in the western hemisphere, However, there is the American model in Saudi Arabia. It seems that the rest of the world uses the light green or the dark green models. 

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Guerrilla Cartographers Put Global Food Stats On The Map

Guerrilla Cartographers Put Global Food Stats On The Map | APHG EMiller | Scoop.it
The mapmakers have amassed some 80 maps for Food: An Atlas, ranging from surplus in Northeast Italy to meat production in Maryland. The goal is to spread information about various food systems so they can be adapted locally.

 

Social media is enhancing digital cooperation to enable some intriguing grass-roots projects such as this one. 

 

Tags: food, agriculture, mapping.


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Interactive: Mapping the World's Friendships

Interactive: Mapping the World's Friendships | APHG EMiller | Scoop.it
Technology bridges distance and borders. Individuals today can keep in touch with their friends and family in completely new ways — regardless of where they live. We explored these internatio...

 

People can be digitally connected with anyone around the world these days, without any limitations by distance or culture.  Yet, by analyzing peoples social networks, it is clear that geographic factors are still a crucial factor in mediating our scoial interactions.  The internet can, but doesn't fully conquer space.    

Tags: socialmedia, worldwide, mapping. 


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 23, 2013 4:08 PM

People can be digitally connected with anyone around the world these days, without any limitations by distance or culture.  Yet, by analyzing peoples social networks, it is clear that geographic factors are still a crucial factor in mediating our scoial interactions.  The internet can, but doesn't fully conquer space.    


Tags: socialmedia, worldwide, mapping.

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Soda vs. Pop with Twitter

Soda vs. Pop with Twitter | APHG EMiller | Scoop.it
One of the great things about Twitter is that it’s a global conversation anyone can join anytime. Eavesdropping on the world, what what!

 

While many educators have been using http://popvssoda.com/ to show the linguistic regions in the United States, this is a similar map, with the added social media component.  To map out these regions, the cartographer used the word choice on geo-tagged tweets as the data source.  For another twitter, map, the following link shows which regions are most actively engaged on Twitter: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/07/06/top-countries-on-twitter_n_1653915.html

What do these regions show us?  What types of regions are these?

 

Seth: This is a fun site! 


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Chris W's comment, August 27, 2012 11:02 AM
This is a really cool use of twitter! I use the term soda, which most of the northeast uses as well.
Courtney Burns's curator insight, September 14, 2013 10:35 PM
Twitter is something that is becoming widely used, and is something I usually check everyday. I never really thought of twitter beyond advertising and communicating. It is amazing the kind of data that can be extracted from peoples tweets. In the soda vs. pop argument I would say soda which makes sense since the data shows that people in the Northeast refer to it as soda. Twitter is so current that you can actually get some current and accurate data just from reading the hash tags in peoples tweets. It's amazing that such information can be extracted from all around the world.
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Redistricting Results

Redistricting Results | APHG EMiller | Scoop.it

While this cartoon is flippant, the attached Washington Post article is not.  In the culumative congressional voting, Democrats have more votes but won fewer seats than the Republicans.  Many are starting to question the redistricting process after the 2010 census. 

  

Tags: gerrymandering, political, mapping, census.


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Why Map Projections Matter

This is a clip from the TV show West Wing (Season 2-Episode 16) where cartography plays a key role in the plot.  In this episode the fictitious (but still on Facebook) group named "the Organization of Cartographers for Social Justice" is campaigning to have the President officially endorse the Gall-Peters Projection in schools and denounce the Mercator projection.  The argument being that children will grow up thinking some places are not as important because they are minimized by the map projection.  While a bit comical, the cartographic debate is quite informative even if it was designed to appear as though the issue was trivial. 

 

Questions to Ponder:  Why do map projections matter?  Is one global map projection inherently better than the rest?  

 

Tags: Mapping, geospatial, video, visualization. 

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Lydia Blevins's comment, September 13, 2012 6:17 AM
I think it is very important that we start using more accurate maps. In school, the maps we use are so different from how the world actually is. I agree that children will grow up thinking some places are less important because they are minimized by the map projection.
Greg Atkinson's comment, October 10, 2012 12:31 PM
Great clip. I use it in my WRG class as a comedic introduction to the power of projection.
Mary Patrick Schoettinger's curator insight, December 18, 2012 3:01 PM

This absolutely the best video clip for SS teachers EVER!

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The True Size Of Africa

The True Size Of Africa | APHG EMiller | Scoop.it

This is another old classic image that I might have shared earlier but it merits repeating. As Salvatore Natoli (a leader in geography education) once said, "In our society we unconsciously equate size with importance and even power." This is one reason why many people have underestimated the true size of Africa relative to places that they view as more important or more powerful.


Tags: mapping, Africa, perspective, images. 


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Afrikasources's curator insight, January 15, 2014 10:10 AM

Just a reminder

Edelin Espino's curator insight, December 5, 2014 11:01 AM

It is incredible big, but unfortunately most of the north area is cover by the big Sahara and most of the are is typically unfertilized. 

Jason Schneider's curator insight, March 9, 4:29 PM

As we can see, there's a little overlapping here and some empty spots but it's pretty accurate. The United States and China are in the top 5 largest countries of the world list and they still fit in the 2nd largest continent of the world, Africa. I'd like to see the size comparison between Africa and Russia. I did some research on that and it turns out that Russia is a little over half the size of Africa, maybe the size of the combination of the United States and China.

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A History of Conflicts

A History of Conflicts | APHG EMiller | Scoop.it
Browse the timeline of war and conflict across the globe.

 

This database of global wars and conflicts is searchable through space and time.  You can drag and click both the map and timeline to locate particular battles and wars, and then read more information about that conflict.  This resource would be a great one to show students and let them explore to find what they see as interesting.  This site is brimming with potential.     


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Sakis Koukouvis's comment, August 16, 2012 8:06 AM
Oh... You are lucky ;-)
Paul Rymsza's comment, August 22, 2012 2:15 PM
the potential of this site is amazing between the interactive learning system and the correlation between the timeline and location. If the human geography class is anything like this i can't wait for it!
Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 28, 2013 3:34 PM

 

This database of global wars and conflicts is searchable through space and time.  You can drag and click both the map and timeline to locate particular battles and wars, and then read more information about that conflict.  This resource would be a great one to show students and let them explore to find what they see as interesting.  This site is brimming with potential.