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Afghan Troops Get a Lesson in American Cultural Ignorance

Afghan Troops Get a Lesson in American Cultural Ignorance | Unit 3 (Cultural Geography) | Scoop.it
Afghan troops are told that insulting behavior by Americans is an oversight, not a slight.

 

Cross-cultural interactions can be beautiful when immersed into a new cultural setting and the visitor learns to appreciate it.  Unfortunately, it can often lead to clumsy missteps that are born out of ignorance of a new guiding set of cultural norms.  Some missteps can lead to great laughter while others can be gravely insulting.  The United States military seeks to train U.S. soldiers about Afghan customs, but they are trying a new tactic as well to minimize these issues.  The U.S. military has prepared a cultural guide to teach the Afghan soldier that they work with about the curious customs that are part of social interaction in the United States but not considered offensive. 

 

Tags: culture, war, unit 3 culture, conflict.


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Charles Matley's comment, October 1, 2012 8:31 AM
Shows that the United States could use a higher quality education.
Rich's comment, October 3, 2012 10:28 AM
We could have used an idea like this quite a long time ago. The cultural bridges have already been burnt to the ground.
Unit 3 (Cultural Geography)
Folk and Popular, Language, Ethnicity, and Religion
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Ukraine: To Face Europe or Russia?

Ukraine: To Face Europe or Russia? | Unit 3 (Cultural Geography) | Scoop.it

"This map illustrates the country's deep division – and why the protests might not be what you think. Ukraine has been wracked by protests for two-plus weeks over President Viktor Yanukovych's decision to reject a deal for closer integration with the European Union. Russian President Vladimir Putin had been pressuring Yanukovych to quit the EU deal and join with a Moscow-led trade union of former Soviet states instead. Will Ukraine's future be with Russia or with Europe?"


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Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 11, 2013 8:52 PM

Language and ethnicity are often tied to a political oriantation because maybe the people feel as if they can connect to someones ideas or beliefs because they are the same gender, race, or share the same cultural traditions. People like to be able to relate to others. 

Tony Aguilar's curator insight, December 12, 2013 11:41 AM

language and ethnicity make a big difference in a country like ukraine, ethncity usually brings along with it relgious and political ties. It would be easier for a country divided as ukraine to ramain autonomous and trade with Russia, and the EU. It would not hurt the country to stay that way.  Right now citizens are tearing down russia related statues and are politcally divided not wanting to merge with Russia with their president. it is important to choose what is most viable for their citizens and country

Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 4, 11:29 AM

There is such a solid division right through the middle of the country maybe it should split like Czechoslovakia did. The North can go with the EU and the south can go with Russia.

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An Annotated Map of Today's Protests and of the 'Muslim World'

An Annotated Map of Today's Protests and of the 'Muslim World' | Unit 3 (Cultural Geography) | Scoop.it

Red indicates violent protests over the film, yellow indicates non-violent protests. Click to enlarge. Protests against the anti-Islam film Innocence of Muslims have erupted in cities from Morocco to Somalia and Pakistan to Indonesia, an agglomeration of otherwise disparate societies that we sometimes refer to as "the Muslim world." That phrase appears today in headlines at, for example, CBS News, the U.K. Telegraph, Radio Free Europe, and many others. A very handy interactive map of the protests so far, produced by The Atlantic Wire's John Hudson, shows just how widely the protests have spread across the diverse Muslim societies of the world.


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Will Data Replace Religion? The new culture of personal data

Will Data Replace Religion? The new culture of personal data | Unit 3 (Cultural Geography) | Scoop.it
PSFK, with The Curve Report from NBCUniversal Content Innovation and Creative Marketing, is examining the new culture of personal data.

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Mixed Girl Tag

Here it is! The Mixed Girl Tag! Ya'll keep at it with the questions so here's a video talking about my ethnicity and all that jazz. I've been hesitant to tal...

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The First Grader — Make a Difference

Watch The First Grader trailer and make a difference! For every trailer viewing on YouTube, Capella University will donate $.50* to the following organizatio...

 

The geography of education can provide some heartbreaking as well as heartwarming stories.  This trailer shows the distinction between traditional and popular cultures while highlighting conflicts based on ethnicity and nationalism, all within the post-colonial context in Kenya.


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Denying ‘Israeli nationality’ only perpetuates discrimination | +972 Magazine

Denying ‘Israeli nationality’ only perpetuates discrimination | +972 Magazine | Unit 3 (Cultural Geography) | Scoop.it
One group of Israelis is working tirelessly to ensure that every citizen of Israel feels like they belong, regardless of religion or ethnicity.

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Crowdsourcing an Israeli-Palestinian Border

Crowdsourcing an Israeli-Palestinian Border | Unit 3 (Cultural Geography) | Scoop.it

A new interactive tool allows you to decide how many Israeli settlers to annex and what constitutes a viable Palestinian state.

 

This article from the Atlantic is a great introduction to a mapping tool that puts the user at the virtual negotiation table.  Peace talk proposals often center around the amount of land that Palestinians want and the Jewish settlements in the West Bank that the Israelis want as a part of the state of Israel.  This interactive, titled Is Peace Possible?, allows the user to propose potential land swaps, see the demographic breakdown of West Bank settlements and videos to introduce users to on 4 major issues: borders, security, refugees and Jerusalem. 

 

Tags: Israel, borders, Palestine, territoriality, political, mapping. 


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The Italians who want to be Austrian

The Italians who want to be Austrian | Unit 3 (Cultural Geography) | Scoop.it
It is Italy's richest province, and has been part of the country for almost 100 years - but some in South Tyrol just do not feel fully Italian.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, December 14, 2012 6:18 AM

While the idea of everyone of the same nationality belonging to the same country might be considered an ideal situation, the world's ethnic geography is too jumbled to create perfect nation-states.  South Tyrol is a part of Italy that is one of those places with mixed a ethnic, linguistic and political heritage.  By different criteria, many of the residents could be considered German, Austrian or Italian or a combination of the them.  Since the Euro Zone fiscal crisis, the push for political autonomy in South Tyrol has intensified, in part because this region has avoided the crisis and is economically fairing better than the rest of Italy.  


Questions to Ponder: How do political borders reveal and conceal "the truth" about places on either side of the line?  What elements are a part of a regions heritage?  Can regions have multiple, overlapping heritages?  How does devolution impact the whole country?  


Tags: Italy, states, autonomy, ethnic, language, devolution.

Scarpaci Human Geography's curator insight, December 14, 2012 8:13 AM

Questions to Ponder: How to political borders reveal and conceal "the truth" about places on either side of the line?  What elements are a part of a regions heritage?  Can regions have multiple, overlapping heritages?  How does devolution impact the whole country?

Allison Anthony's curator insight, December 14, 2012 10:46 AM

Take note Kate and Johnny!!

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Inside Mecca

For over 1400 years, Mecca has been one of the most important cities in the Arabian Peninsula. By the middle of the 6th century, there were three major settl...

 

As the heart of Islam, Mecca brings in pilgrims from around the world.  This documentary gives a great overview of the historical, spiritual and cultural reasons why this is sacred space to over one billion Muslims.  Additionally, this documentary contains an analysis of the logistics that are a part of the Hajj.  

 

Tags: Islam, tourism, place, transportation, religion, Middle East, culture. 

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The Invisible Borders That Define American Culture

The Invisible Borders That Define American Culture | Unit 3 (Cultural Geography) | Scoop.it
We can be connected (or disconnected) based on where we move, how we speak, and even what sports teams we root for.

 

This article is a great source for discussion material on regions (include the ever-famous "Soda/Pop/Coke" regions).  How do we divide up our world?  What are the criteria we use for doing so?


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Religion and Demographics

http://www.ted.com Hans Rosling had a question: Do some religions have a higher birth rate than others -- and how does this affect global population growth? ...

 

What are the connections between religion and demographics?  How does this impact population structure in a particular country?  I found this video from Jeff Martin's fabulous website; Check it out!  http://www.martinsaphug.com/  


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Roland Trudeau Jr.'s comment, July 9, 2012 9:26 AM
An intelligent man, to say the least. i particularly enjoyed the demonstration at the end of birth rates. I found it somewhat surprising that birth rates are not effected much by religion. I felt that typically the religions, such as those that require the couple to be married, would suffer, it being harder to have a child later on. I suppose this would be no difference if they were married early on however.
Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 19, 2013 10:09 AM

What are the connections between religion and demographics?  How does this impact population structure in a particular country?  I found this video from Jeff Martin's fabulous APHG website; Check it out!

Juliette Norwood's curator insight, January 13, 6:21 AM

This can be viewed in the perspective of a citizen of an LDC. In LDCs, there are religions that cause the woman to be subservient to men. A higher birth rate could be the cause. If these  small religions were to distribute and be adhered to, there could possibly be a spike in the birth rate.

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Religion and Tolerance

Religion and Tolerance | Unit 3 (Cultural Geography) | Scoop.it

Just be nice to everyone. 


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Linguistic Geography: My Fair Lady

This is a most decidedly dated reference for pop culture, but a great movie for making explicit the idea that the way we speak is connected to where we've lived (also a good clip to show class differences as well as gender norms). The clip highlights many principles and patterns for understanding the geography of languages.

 

Tags: Language, class, gender, culture, historical, London, unit 3 culture and place.


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João Carreira's comment, September 4, 2012 10:24 AM
...Even as portuguese, I apreceated it very much. Thank you.
Don Brown Jr's comment, September 6, 2012 6:30 AM
This movie clip does demonstrate how language is connected not only to space and location but individual or group experiences as well. The languages used by the upper and lower orders in addressing each other or an “outsider” are very distinct within this film. Therefore if you’re socioeconomic status effects the way you speak then perhaps the type of langue you use can indicate what different social groups within a society consider comical or entertaining such as dance and music?
Jess Pitrone's comment, April 29, 2013 6:18 PM
My Fair Lady has always been one of my favorite movies, and it really sparked my interest in linguistics and accents. Not only does your accent define where you’re from physically, but it defines where you’re from socially, as well. While Eliza Doolittle is from the same country, region, and city as Prof Higgins and the people coming out of the theater, she sounds completely different. Right away, her speech gives away what kind of social background she comes from.
Similarly to the “When did Americans lose their British accents?” article, this article helps relay how accents can help define a physical area, and it also shows a connection between accent and economics. Accent is both a cultural and an economic part of geography.
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14 unbelievably racist things European politici...

14 unbelievably racist things European politici... | Unit 3 (Cultural Geography) | Scoop.it
Anti-Roma hate speech in Europe is nothing new. But somehow, it's always worse than you expect.
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U.S. Religion Map and Religious Populations

U.S. Religion Map and Religious Populations | Unit 3 (Cultural Geography) | Scoop.it
The Pew U.S. Religious Landscape Study religion map diagrams which religions have the highest populations in each state.

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Travis Winger's curator insight, January 7, 7:14 PM

This shows how different cultures and religions have spread throughout America and how certain regions atract certain types of religion. This affects the areas culture and movement of people to certain areas.

Hye-Hyun Kang's curator insight, January 9, 9:13 PM

This shows how different religions have affected different states in the U.S. This affects certain areas in the states and their culture. 

Ryan Randomname's curator insight, January 16, 9:36 AM

Khanh Fleshman's insight: This relates to Key Issue #1 because it shows the distribution of religions on a national scale. It also  highlights the dominance of Christianity and Protestantism in the US.

 

Graham Shroyer's insight: This relates to key issue 1 because it shows the prevalence of christianity, a universalizing religion, in the US.

 

Vinay Penmetsa: This relates with the section, showing how Christianity is an universalizing religion, and its distribution in America.

 

Zahida Ashroff's Insight: This relates to Key Issue #1 because it shows the distribution and density of Protestants in the U.S. This map shows that the highest density of Protestants occur oin the South-Eastern region of the U.S.

 

Rishi Suresh: This relates to the distribution of denominations within America. It shows how the distribution is related to the patterns left by the original settlers. 

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Watch how the major religions have conquered the entire world

Watch how the major religions have conquered the entire world | Unit 3 (Cultural Geography) | Scoop.it
Christianity. Islam. Judaism. Buddhism. Hinduism. All the major religions have basically competed with each other in an epic, historical game of Risk. Who can gain the most converts? Which religion is the most right at being right?

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Juliette Norwood's curator insight, January 6, 9:06 AM

Unlike the distribution map of the USA, this map shows the entire globe and the religions distributed across it. This map shows major universalizing religions that have conquered ethnic religions and how that has impacted the clustering and location of the religions. 

Ryan Randomname's curator insight, January 16, 9:47 AM

Khanh Fleshman's insight: This relates to Key Issue #1 because it shows why the major world religions are distributed as they are today. It shows the determining factors of how far a religion would distribute. 

 

Rishi Suresh: This shows how universalizing religions dominate the religious landscape in most of the world. Ethnic religions like Hinduism are mostly limited to one area. 

 

Vinay Penmetsa: This map shows how religions has spread rapidly through the world, and how universalizing religions religions are young, and have the largest following, while ethnic are smaller and in smaller areas.

 

Graham Shroyer's insight: The map shows distribution of religions around the world and this relates to key issue 1 because it shows how ethnic stay close and universalizing spread around.

 

Zahida Ashroff's Insight: This relates to Key Issue #1 because it shows the distribution of major world religions as they spread throughout the world. The different major world religions are shown to distribute in  different places. 

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Is Beyonce Black, White, Mixed Race, African American? Her Biracial Ethnicity Nationality Heritage

Is Beyonce Black, White, Mixed Race, African American? Her Biracial Ethnicity Nationality Heritage | Unit 3 (Cultural Geography) | Scoop.it
BEYONCE IS OF MIXED ETHNICITY. Her father is of African American heritage, while her mother is a Louisiana Créole. Learn more about her biracial mix.

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Un-Fair Campaign

Un-Fair Campaign | Unit 3 (Cultural Geography) | Scoop.it

The University of Wisconsin-Superior is in one of the least ethnically diverse regions of the United States and the university is partnering with other local organizations across that region aimed at highlighting structural advantages within society for Caucasians.  This campaign to make 'white privilege' visible has not surprisingly generated controversy and has made race and its impact of society an issue quite visible, to the discomfort of many.   The author of the book, "Colorblind," speaks about this issue on PBS as he argues that the United States is not in a post-racial society. 

Questions to Ponder:  In what tangible ways can you see 'white privilege' in our society?  Is this ad campaign a good idea?  What does the term normativity mean and how does it relate to this topic? 

Tags: race, racism, culture, unit 3 culture, book review and ethnicity.


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Jesse Gauthier's comment, September 4, 2012 8:56 AM
I believe this campaign is being made aware in the Wisconsin area of the U.S. because the population is primarily white. Therefore, this region may be trying to make its people aware of the fact that racism can still exist even though this region may be ignorant to this issue. And this region is not to blame for its ignorance because a vast, non-diverse racial community is all they are exposed to, and all they know.
Seth Dixon's comment, September 4, 2012 6:29 PM
I think some people feel that pointing out institutionalized bias feels as though the campaign is blaming them for simply being white. I had a special blue ticket to go to the front of the DMV line today and I was thrilled but it made me think about the others still waiting. There's an analogy in there but I don't want to force it.
steffiquah's curator insight, July 16, 4:25 AM

There is no logic as to why whites should be treated better than the blacks. It is society being biased and we could make a difference. A colour shouldn't define a person's personality, fate, or future. We should not be biased towards them but instead, give them fair and equal opportunities as any other people. I personally do not think racism should be a problem in the first place. What makes them discriminate blacks and make them lower than the whites in the first place? I hope something can be done about this.

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On Israel's system of segregated roads in the occupied Palestinian territories

On Israel's system of segregated roads in the occupied Palestinian territories | Unit 3 (Cultural Geography) | Scoop.it

Tags: MiddleEast, territoriality, transportation, borders, conflict, governance, political, unit 4 political. 


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Cam E's curator insight, March 4, 8:32 AM

A relatively grim reminder that even things as clear-cut as road systems can be inherently political. This system forces segregation by the law of which roads can be driven on, but it's a good jumping point to remember that even the placement of roads can exclude or include communities. I'm reminded of the proposed idea for a NAFTA superhighway running through Mexico, Canada, and the US. One of the criticisms was that the highway would not provide exits for anywhere but major economics centers, effectively cutting off small towns from the rest of the area.

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Chinese-Mexicans Celebrate Return To Mexico

Chinese-Mexicans Celebrate Return To Mexico | Unit 3 (Cultural Geography) | Scoop.it
MEXICO CITY — Juan Chiu Trujillo was 5 years old when he left his native Mexico for a visit to his father's hometown in southern China. He was 35 when he returned.

 

Migratory patterns and globalization can lead to some intriguing cultural blends that would seem improbable 100 years ago. This story of shows vividly how ethnicity does NOT always correspond to culture.


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Cam E's curator insight, February 4, 9:17 AM

What a journey that must have been, to not return to your country for 30 years after going on vacation. Apart from the personal story in the article, the notion of ethnic groups that we practical never hear of is really interesting. While it makes sense that there were Chinese people in Mexico, it's just something which I never actively realized. There should be a  book of ethnic conflicts which never make the well-known history books, if there isn't one already.

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As Kurds Fight for Freedom in Syria, Fears Rise in Turkey

As Kurds Fight for Freedom in Syria, Fears Rise in Turkey of Following Suit

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Joshua Choiniere's comment, December 18, 2012 8:23 AM
This is really interesting professor
Eliana Oliveira Burian's curator insight, December 28, 2012 3:34 AM

How to handle it?

 

Dawn Haas Tache's curator insight, January 8, 2013 10:15 AM

Since the fall of the Ottoman Empire, the Kurds have been caught in other people's plans for what the states of the Middle East should look like and are the largest 'stateless nation' in the world.  Divided between Iraq, Iran, Syria and Turkey, the Kurds have not been able to politically mobilize support for Kurdistan as they have been violently oppressed in these countries.  The Kurds in Iraq have been able to gain political autonomy with the fall of Saddam Hussein's regime, and the Syrian Kurds are hoping to do the same if and when the Assad regime crumbles at the end of the civil war.  This make Turkey concerned that the Kurds in the southeastern part of Turkey will make renewed efforts to push for sovereignty. 


UPDATE: This PBS feature explains the historic timeline of the important political events for the Kurds in Iraq.This article from the Economist focuses on the key reason that outside forces won't leave the Kurds alone: oil.

 

Tags: Syria, ethnic, conflict, political, Turkey, culture, devolution.

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The Geography of Thanksgiving Foods

The Geography of Thanksgiving Foods | Unit 3 (Cultural Geography) | Scoop.it
The terms cooks enter into search engines can provide clues as to what dishes are being cooked around the nation.

 

Some fascinating (if not entirely scientific) maps that show the most common searches on www.allrecipes.com and regional differences in food preferences.  More importantly, it also is an interesting glimpse into the geography of language.  Some similar dishes are called by more regional names (e.g.-"Stuffing" in the Northeast and West, "Dressing" in the Midwest and South).  This set of maps also reinforces the concepts of regions.  This is a fun way to teach some actual content and enjoy the holiday.

 

Tags: language, food, diffusion, regions, seasonal.


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Persian or Iranian? Is there a Difference?

Persian or Iranian?  Is there a Difference? | Unit 3 (Cultural Geography) | Scoop.it
Over the next few months, Ajam Media Collective will host a series that focuses on and describes various elements of the cultural, ethnic and linguistic mosaic that we refer to collectively as Iran...

 

What is in a name?  We know that there are subtle differences between Hispanic, Indigenous, Latino and Mexican that are bound with the history of these words and how they have been used by both insiders and outsiders to construct identity.  Likewise, the distinctions between the terms Persian and Iranian are often used interchangeably.  However there are political, ethnic, linguistic and religious connotations that shape the meanings behind these terms.  While I don't necessarily agree with all of the arguments, this is an interesting look at the historical roots of these distinctions and the ramifications of these terms.   


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Ms. Harrington's comment, July 3, 2012 8:17 PM
This is interesting, I have wondered this myself, when hearing a person describe themselves as Persian. The article goes on to say being Persian is a cultural subset of Iranians, who share a common language and culture. It can be conditered a cultural or political statement to call ones self Persian rather than Iranian.
Cam E's curator insight, March 4, 8:23 AM

This has always been a question between my friends and I, as one of my friends identifies as Persian. In my limited experience in the US it seems that the people who identify themselves as Iranian have immigrated in the last two generations or so. In comparison to families which came over quite a few generations ago who refer to themselves as "Persian"

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Ethnicity and Religion: A Case Study

Ethnicity and Religion: A Case Study | Unit 3 (Cultural Geography) | Scoop.it
In a nation of 230 million people, 700 languages and some 300 ethnicities, ethnic Chinese are one of Indonesia’s historic minorities.

 

Religion and ethnicity are often connected, but not always.  This case study of such a group, the Chinese Muslims of Indonesia, provide an interesting glimpse into the economic, historic and political patterns of these cultural groups that are parts of communal identities.  


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WalkerKyleForrest's curator insight, April 8, 6:42 AM

This article explains the connection between someones ethnicity and someones religion. This connection may not always be as closely linked as youd think. FORREST

Lona Pradeep Parad's curator insight, May 29, 8:40 AM

Pie charts to display ethnicity, religion, and population across the world,

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Mass Sacrifice Found Near Aztec Temple

Mass Sacrifice Found Near Aztec Temple | Unit 3 (Cultural Geography) | Scoop.it

Below street level in Mexico City, archaeologists have found a jumble of bones dating to the 1480s.

 

In the 1970s, construction workers unearthed numerous archaeological finds as the subway was being constructed.  The Mexican government decided to clear the several block of old colonial buildings to reveal the Templo Mayor, the ancient Aztec religious center.  Not coincidentally, the Spaniards built their religious center in the same place.  During the colonial era, the indigenous residents who spoke Spanish in Mexico City still referred to this portion of the city as la pirámide.  Today more finds such as this one are continuing to help us piece together the past of this immensely rich, multi-layered place filled with symbolic value. 

 

Tags: Mexico, LatinAmerica, historical, images, National Geographic, colonialism, place and culture.


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Cam E's curator insight, February 4, 8:58 AM

This should remind us all that we're quite literally built on the sacrifices of our ancestors, no pun intended. Many of the ancient cities of the world lay right under the surface of their modern counterparts, and the secrets yet discovered which they contain is enough to spend lifetimes studying!

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, February 6, 7:42 AM

This article talks about not only the recent archeological find but the relevance of it.  Also included in this article are links to other relevant articles and a cool picture of the past superimposed over the modern day site.

Jess Deady's curator insight, April 17, 1:09 PM

It is not uncommon to find bones underneath rubble and construction sites. To find this amount of ancient bones and bodies underneath that whole place is quite absurd. Now that this has been exposed and people are aware of it, government has cleared the block and revealed the temple.