Unit 3 (Cultural Geography)
2.4K views | +0 today
Follow
Unit 3 (Cultural Geography)
Folk and Popular, Language, Ethnicity, and Religion
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Anthony Bidwell from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

How a Buddhist shrine transformed a neighborhood

How a Buddhist shrine transformed a neighborhood | Unit 3 (Cultural Geography) | Scoop.it

"Sometimes, rehabilitating a rough neighborhood is a tough process. But in one West Coast American city, it was as simple as adding a Buddha statue.  Since the statue's installation, a street corner has been transformed from a notorious eyesore to a daily prayer spot for local Vietnamese Buddhists.  For this Geo Quiz, we're looking for the city where this shrine is located — can you name it?"


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, December 9, 2014 7:51 AM

This podcast is a great glimpse into an urban transformation that took place without any central planning nor can the changes be classified as gentrification. 


Tags: neighborhood, place, culture, economic, urban.

Rescooped by Anthony Bidwell from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Segregation Hits Historic Low

Segregation Hits Historic Low | Unit 3 (Cultural Geography) | Scoop.it
An exodus of African-Americans from struggling industrial cities such as Detroit and the growth of Sunbelt states have pushed racial segregation in U.S. metropolitan areas to its lowest level in a century, according to a new study.

 

Fifty years ago, nearly half the black population lived in a ghetto, the study said, while today that proportion has shrunk to 20%. All-white neighborhoods in U.S. cities are effectively extinct, according to the report.  While the urban geography of North America is not post-racial, many of the glaringly institutionalized problems (e.g.-redlining) have lessened.  


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Jacob Crowell's curator insight, October 15, 2014 2:11 PM

This article shows how immigration and gentrification have helped convert ghettos into racially mixed communities. Segregation based on race is declining but segregation still exist but based on class and income. The rich are divided from the poor, in the 1950s race and income went together. The demographics of rich and poor are changing. In the early and mid 20th century rural blacks moved to urban centers for work and the population of minorities in the inner city boomed. As gentrification occurs, those populations are being pushed out and it is lowing the amounts of segregation. In North America, economic geography is effecting population geography. 

Rescooped by Anthony Bidwell from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

61 Amazing Manhole Covers from Japan

61 Amazing Manhole Covers from Japan | Unit 3 (Cultural Geography) | Scoop.it

Manhole covers are ubiquitous in the modern urban fabric; they are typically drab and purely utilitarian.  In Japan, municipalities take pride in the this ordinary piece of the landscape and convert them into extraordinary works of art that reflect the local people, place and culture. 

 

Tags: book review, landscape, art, urban, culture, place, EastAsia.

 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, April 14, 2014 6:00 PM

This is a great take on art and the ways of celebrating Japan with touches of personal findings and ideas. These manhole covers are cheery and reflect a piece of Japan that not only tell stories, but embrace history.

Kaitlin Young's curator insight, December 12, 2014 3:17 PM

While many would consider it silly to turn something as ordinary as manhole covers into pieces of art, I believe that it is an amazing way to represent the culture of a place. Different townships and neighborhoods in Japan have distinct designs that relate to that place. This acts as an artistic expression of the characteristics of that place, since the designs are often chosen and designed by the people of that place. Some covers show historical events, animals, and even religious symbolism. I would love to flip through the book and try to imagine why each place chose each design.