Unit 3 (Cultural Geography)
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Unit 3 (Cultural Geography)
Folk and Popular, Language, Ethnicity, and Religion
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Europe’s Empty Churches Go on Sale

Europe’s Empty Churches Go on Sale | Unit 3 (Cultural Geography) | Scoop.it
Hundreds of churches around Europe have closed or are threatened by plunging membership, posing a question for communities: What to do with the once-holy, now-empty buildings?

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Chris Plummer's curator insight, February 24, 2015 8:01 AM

Summary- Hundreds of churches around Europe  are being closed and sold to other people. This is due to the lack of membership coming from the people that used to go there. People are turning these churches into various things such as skateparks. I think this is a very disrespectful act, turning a place of worship into a place to destroy. 

 

Insight- In Unit 3 religion is a big part. From this article, we can ask ourselves why the memberships of churches are declining. Do be just not care anymore? Are people moving away? Although the answer is no stated in this article, I think people there are just not as devoted to church as they used to be.

Louis Mazza's curator insight, February 26, 2015 8:09 PM

Europe’s Empty churches going on sale is not upsetting to me, unless they are being used as skateboard parks. The main reason to the church’s closings are a rise in secular beliefs. With less people attending and making tributes to the churches they are given no choice but to shut down. These are buildings of great archaic integrity and I think that they should be sold to museums or to state governments as holy sites or something to that effect. These buildings should be preserved because they are a giant standing living history of this world. But as of now skate ramps and parks occupy these churches and may be damaging them. 

Edgar Manasseh Jr.'s curator insight, March 7, 2015 9:25 PM

Empty buildings now turned into just churches used for fun, or by the picture skateboarding. Europe is always known as the power house especially during their colonial period, when they colonized Africa and brought some of their religious beliefs towards the Africans. Europe is filled with big catholic traditions tracing back to the past, but now with this going on its a very sad state seeing something so significant in history in the European community go to waste..

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The Geography of Thanksgiving Foods

The Geography of Thanksgiving Foods | Unit 3 (Cultural Geography) | Scoop.it
The terms cooks enter into search engines can provide clues as to what dishes are being cooked around the nation.

 

Some fascinating (if not entirely scientific) maps that show the most common searches on www.allrecipes.com and regional differences in food preferences.  More importantly, it also is an interesting glimpse into the geography of language.  Some similar dishes are called by more regional names (e.g.-"Stuffing" in the Northeast and West, "Dressing" in the Midwest and South).  This set of maps also reinforces the concepts of regions.  This is a fun way to teach some actual content and enjoy the holiday.

 

Tags: language, food, diffusion, regions, seasonal.


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Ethnicity and Religion: A Case Study

Ethnicity and Religion: A Case Study | Unit 3 (Cultural Geography) | Scoop.it
In a nation of 230 million people, 700 languages and some 300 ethnicities, ethnic Chinese are one of Indonesia’s historic minorities.

 

Religion and ethnicity are often connected, but not always.  This case study of such a group, the Chinese Muslims of Indonesia, provide an interesting glimpse into the economic, historic and political patterns of these cultural groups that are parts of communal identities.  


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Lona Pradeep Parad's curator insight, May 29, 2014 11:40 AM

Pie charts to display ethnicity, religion, and population across the world,

Felix Ramos Jr.'s curator insight, May 7, 2015 1:26 PM

This is a very unusual circumstance.  The Chinese were originally immigrants to Indonesia.  Then they were regarded as higher on the social status than native Indonesians under Dutch rule.  And eventually when Indonesia got its independence, assimilation was forced on the Chinese.  This is a clear case of racism and religion-forcing at its finest.

Mark Hathaway's curator insight, November 28, 2015 7:17 AM

Indonesia is often identified as the largest Muslim nation in the world. That identification, is only telling a portion of the true Indonesian story. Indonesia is one of the most diverse nations on the planet. The nation has over 700 languages, and has some 300 different ethnicities. Among those may ethnicities, are ethnic Chinese Muslims. Each ethnicity possesses its own cultural identity. In the years following the Second World War, a vast program of persecution was directed at the ethnic Chinese. Many felt, that it was impossible for ethnic Chinese and Indonesians to coexist. After a long struggle, by 2000 ethnic Chinese rights were reinstated.  

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Where Does the South Begin?

Where Does the South Begin? | Unit 3 (Cultural Geography) | Scoop.it
Roads? Religion? Accent? Food? Which factor dictates where the North ends?

 

This is a great intellectual expercise to help student think about regions and how we define them.  The article can help also inform some of their thinking since one of the main problems for students in drawing regional boundaries is a lack of place-based knowledge.   

 

Tags: regions, USA.


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Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, October 12, 2013 6:49 PM

Borders... the first thing I think of was a giant bookstore near my hometown... it now ceases to exist, having been replaced by Barnes and Nobel...  As for the political organization of space, I could apply this situation and laugh.  Borders will cease to be, and they will be called after people's last names!  I think this has already happened, when people unite together in countries such as the USA- although borders are specific, the general federal laws and many policies still apply in all states... generally. And people's names are often the namesakes of places.  I don't like the idea of borders, though, it seems like a bunch of warmongers trying to get ahead in a world where they can't truly cheat death, so they cheat other people of land that may have been decreed in ancient documents as property of their ancestors, or even in accordance with the righteousness of the universe and what should be alloted to whom.  Ownership is a concept of denial, because no one can truly own anything, not even our bodies, which contain trillions of infinite universes the size of the large one around us that we commonly refer to.  Borders are relative, and will likely become recognized as obsolete.  I know this was abstract, but it's my thoughts on the topic.

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Forget Midwest. We Are North: Repositioning Minnesota's National Identity for the 21st Century

Forget Midwest. We Are North: Repositioning Minnesota's National Identity for the 21st Century | Unit 3 (Cultural Geography) | Scoop.it

“The Midwest is this big nebulous part of the country and it's kind of what's left over after all the other regions of the country are defined. Those regions have much stronger identities if you think of the East Coast or maybe New England or the Pacific Northwest or certainly the South. The Midwest is kind of the catchall for what's left.  We [Minnesota] should be called the North.”


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, December 9, 2014 1:48 PM

Whether I agree or not with the ideas being discussed, I simply love that this discussion is taking place and how intensely geographical the ideas and evidences being brought forward are.  


Questions to Ponder: So what region do you live in?  What defines that region?  Are there other regions that you can claim to be a part of also?  How would you divide the United States into various regions?  How come?


Tagsplaceregions, culture

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The Invisible Borders That Define American Culture

The Invisible Borders That Define American Culture | Unit 3 (Cultural Geography) | Scoop.it
We can be connected (or disconnected) based on where we move, how we speak, and even what sports teams we root for.

 

This article is a great source for discussion material on regions (include the ever-famous "Soda/Pop/Coke" regions).  How do we divide up our world?  What are the criteria we use for doing so?


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Bella The Non-Vampire's curator insight, August 21, 2014 10:22 AM

i believe that these fifty states are divided into three different regions that define them by what those regions are made of. Those regions im talking about are the formal, functional, and vernacular regions. Some types of examples of those regions are common language, transportaion, and mental maps. I.C.

Kedryn bray's curator insight, March 15, 9:45 AM
I think the United states does have many invisible cultural borders like the way people use certain words like soda or pop or coke. These define where different types of people love and it shows different sides of America. We are split up by many different kinds of small borders but those borders sometimes change the way we all speak and do things.
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Ethnicity and Religion: A Case Study

Ethnicity and Religion: A Case Study | Unit 3 (Cultural Geography) | Scoop.it
In a nation of 230 million people, 700 languages and some 300 ethnicities, ethnic Chinese are one of Indonesia’s historic minorities.

 

Religion and ethnicity are often connected, but not always.  This case study of such a group, the Chinese Muslims of Indonesia, provide an interesting glimpse into the economic, historic and political patterns of these cultural groups that are parts of communal identities.  


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Lona Pradeep Parad's curator insight, May 29, 2014 11:40 AM

Pie charts to display ethnicity, religion, and population across the world,

Felix Ramos Jr.'s curator insight, May 7, 2015 1:26 PM

This is a very unusual circumstance.  The Chinese were originally immigrants to Indonesia.  Then they were regarded as higher on the social status than native Indonesians under Dutch rule.  And eventually when Indonesia got its independence, assimilation was forced on the Chinese.  This is a clear case of racism and religion-forcing at its finest.

Mark Hathaway's curator insight, November 28, 2015 7:17 AM

Indonesia is often identified as the largest Muslim nation in the world. That identification, is only telling a portion of the true Indonesian story. Indonesia is one of the most diverse nations on the planet. The nation has over 700 languages, and has some 300 different ethnicities. Among those may ethnicities, are ethnic Chinese Muslims. Each ethnicity possesses its own cultural identity. In the years following the Second World War, a vast program of persecution was directed at the ethnic Chinese. Many felt, that it was impossible for ethnic Chinese and Indonesians to coexist. After a long struggle, by 2000 ethnic Chinese rights were reinstated.