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Unit 3 (Cultural Geography)
Folk and Popular, Language, Ethnicity, and Religion
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Chinese-Mexicans Celebrate Return To Mexico

Chinese-Mexicans Celebrate Return To Mexico | Unit 3 (Cultural Geography) | Scoop.it
MEXICO CITY — Juan Chiu Trujillo was 5 years old when he left his native Mexico for a visit to his father's hometown in southern China. He was 35 when he returned.

 

Migratory patterns and globalization can lead to some intriguing cultural blends that would seem improbable 100 years ago. This story of shows vividly how ethnicity does NOT always correspond to culture.


Via Seth Dixon
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Cam E's curator insight, February 4, 2014 12:17 PM

What a journey that must have been, to not return to your country for 30 years after going on vacation. Apart from the personal story in the article, the notion of ethnic groups that we practical never hear of is really interesting. While it makes sense that there were Chinese people in Mexico, it's just something which I never actively realized. There should be a  book of ethnic conflicts which never make the well-known history books, if there isn't one already.

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Mass Sacrifice Found Near Aztec Temple

Mass Sacrifice Found Near Aztec Temple | Unit 3 (Cultural Geography) | Scoop.it

Below street level in Mexico City, archaeologists have found a jumble of bones dating to the 1480s.

 

In the 1970s, construction workers unearthed numerous archaeological finds as the subway was being constructed.  The Mexican government decided to clear the several block of old colonial buildings to reveal the Templo Mayor, the ancient Aztec religious center.  Not coincidentally, the Spaniards built their religious center in the same place.  During the colonial era, the indigenous residents who spoke Spanish in Mexico City still referred to this portion of the city as la pirámide.  Today more finds such as this one are continuing to help us piece together the past of this immensely rich, multi-layered place filled with symbolic value. 

 

Tags: Mexico, LatinAmerica, historical, images, National Geographic, colonialism, place and culture.


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Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, October 16, 2014 6:20 PM

Of course archaeological finds like this are always interesting for understanding the past but this story has two angles. First and probably the most obvious is the wealth of anthropological and history information that can be gathered. This could potentially lead to an advancement in the understanding of Aztec society. But on another angle it is an interesting article because it illustrates how so often the new is built right on top of the old. Where was the old capital of the Aztec Empire? Right under the new capital of Mexico. While by doing so one definitely keeps the same advantages that lead to choosing that land in the first place but it also destroys history and origins of a peoples history.  

Shanelle Zaino's curator insight, October 16, 2014 8:50 PM

Wow! What an amazing archaeological discovery. Seeing the image of the Aztec temple superimposed to Mexico city really shows the immense size of this structural relic.It is interesting to know that the Spaniards had also built their religious temple on this location. This is a tremendous find not only structurally but also in human biology. Many bodies were exhumed during this discovery. The bodies can not only tell us scientifically what has happened ,we can also learn from them what type of funerary processes were used during this time.

Hector Alonzo's curator insight, October 26, 2014 10:00 PM

While the Aztec' civilization has been gone for a very long time, there are still traces of it resurfacing today. With the uncovering of the bones, it shows that the Aztec temple was very much in the heart of Mexico City has still has more secrets to uncover