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Golden Temple of Amristar

"The Golden Temple is the holiest shrine of the Sikh religion. It is also home to one of the largest free eateries in the world. Read the related article."


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Louis Mazza's curator insight, April 6, 4:33 PM

The Golden Temple of Amristar, located in the northern Punjab region of India, is renowned as the holiest shrine in the Sikh religion. 80,000 -160,000 people come here each day to enjoy a free eatery on top of prayer. This is the largest free eatery in the world. What an unbelievable idea that this huge number of people can enjoy free food. Food is cooked up by workers in large vats in order to feed the masses. This is not a homeless shelter, there was a man in this video who said he was from a prominent family and he can to the temple because he felt peace of mind here. The temple is covered in glitter and gold hence its name.

Felix Ramos Jr.'s curator insight, April 24, 10:53 AM

I think this idea is excellent. Sikhism is a blend of Islam and Hinduism.  They believe that everyone is equal and strive for peace and tranquility.  The Golden Temple is, essentially, a place to go to get away from the fast-paced and cut-throat environment of everyday-life.  They accept all races and religions.  I love this model and idea.  I hope the Sikhs gain more attention and spread their simple idea of peace, love, and volunteerism.

Kevin Cournoyer's curator insight, May 7, 8:29 AM

This video provides some valuable insight into a religion that not many people know about. Sikhism combines elements of Hinduism and Islam, but rejects the Hindu concept of a caste system. It is practiced predominantly in the Punjab region of India, but practicing Sikhs can be found around the world. The Golden Temple of Amristar is one of Sikhism's most important holy sites, and adherents of any religion are welcome at the temple. There is a large community kitchen inside the temple, where volunteers produce tens of thousands of meals for temple visitors everyday. Everyone who visits the temple sits and eats together in the community eatery, as Sikhs believe all people are equal, and so they are not concerned with separating visitors by gender, race, or religion.

 

Sikhism and its Golden Temple are really interesting examples of cross-cultural pollination. While it is not unusual to see cultures adapt elements of fashion or music from other cultures, it is unusual to see one culture fuse its religion with another. Generally, religion is seen as a concrete ideology with immutable truths that should not be disturbed or tampered with. Sikhism sheds this rigidity and incorporates elements of two major religions into one, creating a religion of peace, equality, and tolerance. This is the ideal of any religion, and Sikhism exhibits wonderfully. The Punjab region of India acts as a melting pot for Hinduism and Islam, creating a geographic center for ideologies that reach far beyond their geographic origins. Though Sikhism is a small religion compared to Islam or Hinduism, it provides a fascinating and excellent example of how cultures can come together peacefully to create something new and positive. 

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Cityscapes of Chicago

Cityscape Chicago II is a personal timelapse piece that I have worked on periodically over the past two years. The inspiration behind the project ties similarly with the original piece. As the city of Chicago continues to change, my fascination with it grows as well. The goal for me is always to capture the city in a unique way from new perspectives, and to continue exploring it.

 

Tags: Chicago, urban, place, landscape,  video.


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 12, 2014 8:08 AM

A little closer to my home and workplace, here is a similar video about Providence, Rhode Island.

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How harsh environments make you believe in God (or gods)

How harsh environments make you believe in God (or gods) | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
A new study links climatic instability and a lack of natural resources to belief in moralizing gods in cultures around the world.

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Scott Langston's curator insight, November 16, 2014 6:25 PM

Inspiring faith? Is God an environmental construct?

Kelli Jones's curator insight, December 2, 2014 1:06 AM

This article talks about how where we live can influence our religion. I couldn't agree more. Although I have been an active member of a church for a long time now I can't help but think that if I didn't live in the US I wouldn't be a Christian. If I were born in China for example I may not even know the name Jesus Christ. That's a scary thought. 

Molly McComb's curator insight, March 21, 3:59 PM

This shows how different cultures have adapted to harsh environments 

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Kuwaiti cartoonist battles opponents on how to portray Islam to the world

Kuwaiti cartoonist battles opponents on how to portray Islam to the world | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it

"Naif al-Mutawa, creator of comic book series THE 99, spoke with Al-Monitor about the recent death threat by the Islamic State and how US President Barack Obama's enemies became his."

 

Seven years after the Kuwaiti psychologist and entrepreneur first launched his comic book series based on the 99 attributes of Allah, he's facing a sudden onslaught of death threats, fatwas and lawsuits (his comic books were highlighted in this TED talk on cultural change in the Islamic World). His US distributor, meanwhile, continues to sit on a TV deal, in part because of pressure from conservative bloggers who object to any positive description of Islam.

 Tags: Middle East, religion, Islam.
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Kaitlin Young's curator insight, December 12, 2014 3:06 PM

Islam faces many challenges in today's world. Many Muslims  believe that media and pop culture threaten to undermine the value and teachings of Islam, there are people who are trying to embrace world cultural trends in order to make the religion more relative to today's youths. A Kuwaiti psychologist is combining pop culture with Islam by meshing together comic book superheros and religion. This adaptation to the changing world is angering fundamentalists, but in order for a religion to remain viable in a changing world, it needs to remain static. 

Bob Beaven's curator insight, March 19, 2:56 PM

It is very difficult to be trapped between two cultures, as this article shows.  Mutawa tried to create a positive image for Islam by creating a group of comic superheros entitled the "ninety nine".  However, this not only backfired in the Middle East but also in the United States of America.  Radical Muslims, including the IS, are upset by his actions and the Islamic State even called for his head on twitter.  In the US, on the other hand, conservatives believe that his comic, and the subsequent cartoon that was to be developed from it, were going to create a sense of radicalism in children.  The conservatives in the US even went as far to say that it would encourage them to become suicide bombers.  Yet, before all these outbursts started about Mutawa's project, the Saudi's believed it was alright, and Obama praised it.  This just shows how intolerance to an idea can come from more than one direction.  In a sense, this shows that race and culture are very controversial, and it also shows that understandings of the same thing can vary upon the region one lives in.   

 

Jared Medeiros's curator insight, March 29, 4:23 PM

This could have been a great way for Muslim customs to be taught to a whole new demographic of people all over the world.  People are very uneducated all across the globe when it comes to religions outside of their own.  Anytime you can show a side of your culture to a large audience to change a negative perception it should be taken advantage of.

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40 Percent Of The World's Cropland Is In Or Near Cities

40 Percent Of The World's Cropland Is In Or Near Cities | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
Just how much of the world's cropland can we really call urban? That's been a big mystery until now.

 

Now, a study published in the journal Environmental Research Letters has an answer: Somewhere around 1.1 billion acres is being cultivated for food in or within about 12 miles (20 kilometers) of cities. Most of that land is on the periphery of cities, but 16.6 percent of these urban farms are in open spaces within the municipal core.


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Evan Margiotta's curator insight, March 20, 2:42 PM

This is a perfect application of how Von Thunen model still applies today. Von Thunen mapped how crops were distributed around cites. The crops near the city were labor intensive while the crops farther away from the city were labor extensive. Von Thunen's model is often disputed today in a world with such fast transportation, but this study shows that it still applies today. Unit 5 Agriculture

Ellen Van Daele's curator insight, March 22, 3:34 PM

This research explores the concept of urban agriculture and the water supply needed and used. It came up with surprising results that state that 80% of urban agriculture is in the developing world and 40% of urban agriculture is in or near cities.  

 

The research also covered water supply, stating that most of urban agriculture relies on irrigation. This is especially true in South Asia, and since the water resources are already scarce, the farmers have to compete for water with the government.

Raychel Johnson's curator insight, March 22, 7:55 PM

Summary: This article is mostly about how much of our agriculture is grown within 20 miles of a city. It turns out 40% of agriculture is grown in this proximity of a city, and this mostly occurs with irrigated agriculture in South Asia. Most of these urban farms are in the developing world as well. 

 

Insight: This article relates to the von Thunen model because it directly talks about the rings that occur around a city, although it is a skewed version of it. I think this is also a good example of how cities have changed since the developing of the von Thunen model, showing that developed countries are supporting the idea of urban agriculture. 

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Here's what 9,000 years of breeding has done to corn, peaches, and other crops

Here's what 9,000 years of breeding has done to corn, peaches, and other crops | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
Corn, watermelon, and peaches were unrecognizable 8,000 years ago.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 28, 2014 1:25 PM

I think the term 'artificial' in the image might be misleading and it depends on your definition of the word.  Humans have been selectively breed plants and animals for as long as we've been able to domestic them; that is a 'natural' part of our cultural ecology and has lead to great varieties of crops that are much more suitable for human consumption than what was naturally available.  Long before climate change, humans have been actively shaping their environment and the ecological inputs in the systems with the technology that their disposal.  This is a good resource to teach about the 1st agricultural revolution.     


Tags: food, agriculture, consumption, unit 5 agriculture.

Emerald Pina's curator insight, March 22, 9:39 PM

This article shows how crops were entirely different 8,000 years ago. It shows how much we have breeded and affected the natural crops. With the example of peaches, watermelons, and corn, the article shows how the natural crop didn't taste as good and was a lot smaller. The natural peach had 64% edible food; whereas the 2014 peach had 90% edible food. The pictures comparing the natural and artificial crops also illustrated how the many varieties of that specific crop had grown and where the crop is found has grown. Lastly, the diagrams compares the water and sugar percentages. This article paints a good picture as to how much mankind has affected our land and agriculture. Also, how much our crops have changed due to selective breeding.

 

The article gives a good illustration of topics in Unit 5: Agriculture, Food Production, and Rural Land Use. The article shows how selective breeding has affected many crops. It gives a good view as to how selective breeding and agriculture has been affected and changed in the Neolithic Agriculture Revolution. The article explains what what life was like and how it changed in the Neolithic times. This article is really interesting in showing how crops were changed.

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Asian Border Disputes

Asian Border Disputes | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it

Tags: borders, political, conflict, infographic, map.


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Asie(s)'s curator insight, November 23, 2014 10:23 PM

A good overview on the matter!

Kevin Barker's curator insight, November 25, 2014 8:20 AM

A great primer for discussions over border disputes.  In this modern geopolitical climate, some of these claims can seem aggressive to say the least.  The strategies/responses can also be very interesting when military options are put aside.

Jake Red Dorman's curator insight, November 25, 2014 12:36 PM

I was looking at the disputes between the Paracel Islands, the Spratly Islands, and the Scarborough Shoal. What I notices with all oft he disputes, the land being fought over is all claimed by China but the land location itself is all closer to the country china is disputing it over. For the Paracel Islands, China and Vietnam are in dispute especially after China put 2 oil rigs by their land. The other dispute between the Spratly Islands, China and the Philippines each claim entire ownership of the lands but Malaysia, Indonesia, and Brunei all claim some part of the islands as well. For the Scarborough Shoal, it is a lot closer to the Philippines than it is to China but China claims it as their own since they discovered the land. Now china has restricted access to the island following a standoff.    

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Geography of Thanksgiving

Geography of Thanksgiving | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 26, 2014 3:31 PM

I am very pleased to be blogging for National Geographic Education.  Here is the link to my first post on the geography of Thanksgiving. 

Rich Schultz's curator insight, November 28, 2014 2:34 PM

Dr. Seth Dixon also has geographyeducation.org, one of the finest sites of its kind...

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Flat Earth Theory Explained

How do you see it? http://theflatearthsociety.org/cms/ http://www.tfes.org/

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 20, 2014 1:29 PM

DISCLAIMER THAT I WISH I DIDN'T HAVE TO MAKE: I don't believe in the flat Earth theory and think that this video is total jibberish; but it is delightfully inaccurate!  This is a good way to get students to think critically about epistemology (how we know what we know) and defend their own world view.  This also helps students to assess the validity of online sources


Tagssocial media.

Jeremy Hansen's curator insight, December 1, 2014 11:27 AM

Wow. This is why a knowledgable, educated populace is important. To refute misinformed and mistaken "science." 

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MLA Language Map


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 30, 2014 7:51 PM

This is a great ESRI-powered portal to information and spatial data about languages in the United States.


Tags: language, culture, English, ESRI, USA.

Aria Snedegar's curator insight, January 30, 10:02 AM

This is cool

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Most Tibetans Genetically Adapted To The High Life

Most Tibetans Genetically Adapted To The High Life | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
Ninety percent of Tibetans share a genetic mutation that prevents their blood from becoming dangerously clogged with red blood cells at high altitudes—a response that can be deadly for non-native mountaineers. Karen Hopkin reports.

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Kristin Mandsager San Bento's curator insight, April 7, 9:20 PM

Life will evolve and adapt or it will die off.  Tibetans have adapted to their living situations.  Isn't this natural selection?  I think so, especially because 90% of Tibetans have this genetic mutation.  The mutation only arrived 8,000 years ago.  

Danielle Lip's curator insight, April 7, 9:27 PM

The fact that the people in Tibet have become environmentally and culturally adapted to the land shows just how serious the whole mutation is. Many people who would travel to such high heights would not be able to respond in the same was as the Tibetans. This mutation prevents blood from becoming severely clogged and could injure those who are not mountaineers in the area. This mutation started about 8,000 years ago which is interesting because who was the first person to have this gene mutation and what caused the mutation? Tibetan people have a rare gene sequence that shows just how special they are to their land and I find it quite interesting because not everyone would be able to live with it? What would happen if the people of Tibet happen to move someone outside of Tibet, would their blood start to clog? 

90% of people in Tibet have this gene sequence and shows how the gene adaptation will change due to levels of height, having a play on words because the Tibetan people are always at very high levels. Thin air and clogged blood are not a good combination.

Felix Ramos Jr.'s curator insight, April 15, 9:45 AM

This is extremely interesting.  When I think of the mutated gene that most Tibetans have I think of evolution happening right in front of our eyes.  Most lowland humans would not be able to survive at the Tibetan level of living, which goes to show you that over time the people who live in this area were naturally selected due to the special genes of their ancestors who survived while others without the gene died off.

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See How Humans Have Reshaped the Globe With This Interactive Atlas

See How Humans Have Reshaped the Globe With This Interactive Atlas | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it

"

Earth is changing rapidly, and an increasing number of scientists say that humans have become the dominant force driving these changes. While the term has no formal definition, many agree that we are now living in an age shaped by human activity: the Anthropocene.

Evidence for the Anthropocene ranges from worldwide population booms to the expansive transformation of the landscape. But solutions are cropping up at the local level that could help create a more resilient global community." 

 


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Olga Boldina's curator insight, December 3, 2014 3:25 AM

добавить ваше понимание ...

Truthbehere2's curator insight, December 5, 2014 10:01 AM

Well duh...we are very greedy leeches that don't want to take the time to restore and repair what we take and destroy...

Kristen McDaniel's curator insight, December 8, 2014 10:58 AM

Excellent use of an Esri Storymap to outline how humans have changed Earth over time.

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Ethiopia's refugee camps swell with South Sudanese escaping war – in pictures

Ethiopia's refugee camps swell with South Sudanese escaping war – in pictures | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
Tens of thousands of South Sudanese people have poured across the border into Ethiopia to escape conflict in recent months
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How cultures around the world make decisions

How cultures around the world make decisions | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
Is the American obsession with individual freedom really such a great idea? What other cultures know about how to make good choices.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 6, 2014 1:16 PM

This article show three distinct cultural approaches to the concept of choice, showing how they shape people and communities and cultural systems.  The three models discussed are:

  • One American model: Give me personal autonomy or give me death.
  • The Amish model: Belonging, not choice, is crucial.
  • One Asian model: Focus on interdependence and harmony, not independence and self-expression.

This TED talk from Malcolm Gladwell is also an interesting exploration into the world of choice and options.


Tagsculture, worldwideTED.

Dennis Swender's curator insight, November 11, 2014 3:31 PM

Decision tilmes, more or less

Scott Langston's curator insight, November 16, 2014 6:26 PM

Culture's influence on decision-making

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Geography of Europe Games

Geography of Europe Games | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it

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Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, December 17, 2014 1:59 AM

I thought that this game was really useful for getting to know all different aspects of Europe. I really like how it was separated into a variety of different categories that focused on different things in Europe. Of course I was familiar with the countries category. Some things that I was not familiar with before finding this game was all the bodies of water in Europe. I am now aware of the different lakes, seas, and rivers in Europe. I thought it was really cool how it went into some real detail and included aspects like the ports, volcanoes, monarchies, and the battles. I definitely was not aware with any of these before seeing this game. I think this is a very useful game if you wish to know more about Europe or maybe even if you're traveling there and want to get some background knowledge.

Jared Medeiros's curator insight, February 18, 5:49 PM

An absolutely great and fun way to learn and explore different geographic locations.  Anytime learning can be made fun or turned into a game is always a win-win.  I found myself screwing around with these mini games and before I knew it, 45 minutes had passed, and I was not as good at Geography as I thought I was.  I will be back to play/learn more!

Lena Minassian's curator insight, February 18, 6:59 PM

This is an interesting way to learn geography in a more interactive way. This link provides many different games that allow you to not only play a game but learn while you do it! These games can test capitals, rivers, monarchies, countries, regions, peninsulas, battles, etc. All of these relate to Europe and can provide different learning techniques for anyone who is interested in them.

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The largest city in Brazil is running dangerously low on water

The largest city in Brazil is running dangerously low on water | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
Thanks to the worst drought in eight decades, millions of people in São Paulo are facing water outages.

 

Tags: Brazil, urban, water, urban ecology, climate change, environment depend, sustainability, agriculture, food production.


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Adilson Camacho's curator insight, November 23, 2014 4:59 PM

adicionar a sua visão ...

Jake Red Dorman's curator insight, November 25, 2014 12:49 PM

Brazil’s largest city, Sao Paulo, which provides one third of the countries GPD, is now running low or water due to one of the worst droughts in 8 years. There are more than 21 million people in this city and 13 million of them are facing water outages. If it doesn't rain soon, the city could face a collapse. The city has blamed the drought of lack of water in the vapor clouds that the amazon usually provides to the city. They also blame it on deforestation and global warming. President Dilma Rousseff has questioned the cities misusage of their water supply, claiming that the city mismanaged their water supply.  

Lydia Tsao's curator insight, March 23, 10:16 AM

This shows just how important water is the human race. It also shows how humans have no sense of urgency in conserving water until it's too late. The saying "you never know a good thing until it's gone" applies in this case. The Brazilian government did not take any sufficient measures to conserve water until it realized how depleted the reservoir is. This event demonstrates the environmental impact of  water depletion on humans, and how humans have such a huge impact on the geographical landscape on Earth. As seen in the picture above, many greens turned yellow as a result of the lowering water levels. The river beds are soon going to be overgrown by shrubbery as water no longer exists there. These are all results of a combination of natural (lack of rain) and human causes of resource depletion.

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Uganda planning new anti-gay law

Uganda planning new anti-gay law | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it

"Uganda plans to introduce a new anti-gay law that will withstand any legal challenge, a government minister has told the BBC. It will not explicitly refer to homosexuality, but will rely on the penal code which prescribes a life sentence for 'unnatural acts', he said. Activists say the plan is more draconian than anti-gay legislation annulled by the courts in August. The US and other donors cut funding to Uganda in protest against the law. Uganda is a deeply conservative society where homosexual acts are already illegal."

 

Tag: sexuality, Uganda.


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India's Potty Problem

India's Potty Problem | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it

Which statement is true? 

 

A. 60% of all households without toilets in the world are in India.
B. India’s Muslims are less affected by the sanitation problem than Hindus.
C. India’s lack of toilets is worse than China’s.
D. Lack of toilets in India puts women at especially high risk.


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Brett Laskowitz's curator insight, April 19, 7:41 PM

Excellent article for sparking discussion on the costs of development.

Jared Medeiros's curator insight, April 22, 6:37 PM

Unfathomable to see that all of these are true, but at the same time not unbelievable.  I can see sanitation problems being relevant wherever there is overpopulation in the world.  Especially here where Muslims are defecating outside as a part of ritual, you wonder if they would use toilets even if they had them.  India is lucky they don't have some disease running ram,pant that can kill large portions of their population in a hurry like the plague in England.

Felix Ramos Jr.'s curator insight, April 24, 10:48 AM

In America, this story is not fathomable.  The sanitation problem in India goes beyond cultural norms, in my opinion.  I think it is evident of an infrastructure that is way behind the country's socioeconomic level of growth.  It seems like finally, after electing a new prime minister, that there will be much focus brought on the issue.  It also seems that if they don't shore up this sanitation issue that they will have a bigger epidemic on their hands, as there have been recent murders and rapes of young women in these sanitation fields.

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23 maps and charts on language

23 maps and charts on language | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it

"Did you know that Swedish has more in common with Hindi than it does with Finnish? Explaining everything within the limits of the world is probably too ambitious a goal for a list like this. But here are 23 maps and charts that can hopefully illuminate small aspects of how we manage to communicate with one another."

 

Tags: language, culture, English, infographic.


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Rich Schultz's curator insight, November 26, 2014 1:40 PM

Mapping of languages...

Isabella El-Hage's curator insight, March 19, 11:15 AM

This article links with Unit Three through "language and communication". These 23 maps range from the history of languages, which languages connect with which, common languages in certain places, different phrases used in the same country for the same thing, and more. Looking at maps to spatially see language helps when trying to understand how the world communicates. One of the maps that I found interesting was the "New York tweets by language". It shows how diverse that city is, and how people are still preserving their native language in a English prominent country.  

Avery Liardon's curator insight, March 23, 9:00 PM

Unit 2:

Shows how many languages are actually closely related. Whether or not they sound the same or are located in similar regions, many share the same origins. For example: many words in Spanish and English are the same due to their similar roots. 

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Africa, Uncolonized: A Detailed Look at an Alternate Continent

Africa, Uncolonized: A Detailed Look at an Alternate Continent | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
What if the Black Plague had killed off almost all Europeans? Then the Reconquista never happens. Spain and Portugal don't kickstart Europe's colonization of other continents. And this is what Africa might have looked like.

 

Tags: Africa, colonialism, borders, historical, map.


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Alec Castagno's curator insight, December 17, 2014 10:37 AM

It is fascinating to see how different the political borders of Africa would have been without European colonial influence. One thing this map predicts is that if the Europeans would not have pushed into Africa, Arab and Islamic influences would have filled the void. The huge number of independent states or regions on this map show how large the continent is and how many different ethnic and religious groups there are.

Wilmine Merlain's curator insight, December 17, 2014 5:59 PM

I sometimes do question, what would Africa look like today if it weren't colonized by the Europeans. Before the discovery of Africa, Africa was a land that was dominated by wealthy kingdoms that spent most of its time conquering other countries. With the ideology that Africa was a land flowing with milk and honey inhabited by uncivilized human beings, conquering Africa seemed like the ideal thing for European super powers to do in order to exploit the lands natural resource at no cost. If Africa was not colonized by Europeans, Africans would have more access to their own natural resources, and the instability that most of African countries face today would most likely not be in existence.

Bob Beaven's curator insight, March 26, 2:26 PM

An interesting fact for a geographer/historian to look at is how different events happening in history can affect a map.  This is very fascinating, because Africa or should I say Alkebu-Lan has very strong looking kingdoms without the Influence of Europe.  Another interesting element of the map is how it is not Euro-centric, Africa is shown as the top of the world.  I guess in this history, Northern Europe instead of being a powerhouse of the world, would be classified as the dark region (like the Congo was in our own world).  It is also interesting how the map is not Euro-centric, but the fact to keep in mind there is the old saying, history is written by the winner.  In this case, the map of the world was drawn by the winning Europeans as well, and this map completely reverses that.  Another interesting fact, is that the Iberian is part of an Islamic Empire.  It looks, as if in this history, Portugal was overcome by the "Arabes" and Spain never even attempted to launch the Reconquista.  History and Geography, especially Political Geography are very closely linked with one another.  

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Changing The World, One Map At A Time

Maps have always been a source of fascination and intrigue. Today's maps, however, can also help to save lives during disasters, document human rights abuses and monitor elections in countries under repressive rule. This presentation will explain how today's live maps can combine crowds and clouds to drive social change.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 20, 2014 1:03 PM

On this Thanksgiving, I want to remind this community that geospatial skills can be used to help othersWant to see geographic knowledge and geospatial skills in action?  Crowd-sourced mapping is increasingly an important resource during an emergency.  Poorer places are often not as well mapped out by the commercial cartographic organizations and these are oftentimes the places that are hardest hit by natural disasters.  Relief agencies depend on mapping platforms to handle the logistics of administering aid and assessing the extent of the damage and rely on these crowd-sourced data sets made by people like you and me. 


Tagsdisasters, mapping, cartographyTED201, video.

Jon Olaizola's curator insight, November 28, 2014 11:55 AM

You can help!

Rich Schultz's curator insight, November 28, 2014 2:47 PM

Tedx

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Industrial Revolution--Urban Game

Industrial Revolution--Urban Game | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it

"Each student should have a large piece of butcher block paper (15x20).  They should use a pencil for this activity (color pencils are optional).Using the template provided, each student should make their own template.  It is crucial that size for each of the 'characters' in the city be the same. As you read each of the Rounds, your pace should increase so that by Round 15 the students will only have a short time to draw their buildings."                                

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This brilliant illustration shows how much public space we've surrendered to cars

This brilliant illustration shows how much public space we've surrendered to cars | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
How lopsided the the proportions of an urban street corner really are.

 

Most roads in the US are built for cars, not for pedestrians. Whether we're happy or unhappy with this, most of us are aware of it.

But this brilliant illustration, made by Swedish artist Karl Jilg and commissioned by the Swedish Road Administration, shows just how extreme the situation truly is — even in an urban business district that's designed with pedestrians in mind. 


Tags: urban, transportation, planning, art.


Via Seth Dixon
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Why are the Mint countries special?

Why are the Mint countries special? | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon
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Edelin Espino's curator insight, December 13, 2014 2:45 PM

The next generation will come with more country's developments and those could be the MINT countries which are, Mexico, Indonesia, Nigeria and Turkey, their economy are increasing and are far more bigger than what it was in the 2003. That would be awesome to see all those countries with a developed economy. That will improve the lives of millions and specially Mexicans! Can't wait to see how it will turn out.

Bob Beaven's curator insight, February 5, 2:05 PM

Mexico, along with the other countries in the MINT category, are developing countries that could one day become economic powerhouses.  Mexico, as noted in the article, is in a strong position to become an economic powerhouse, due to the fact that it is in between the United States and the developing countries to its south.  Mexico does face a battle however, as the country has been dominated by corruption for decades, yet the new president, who is young and energetic, is attempting to reform the system and put an end to the wide spread problem.  If Mexico can become a major economic powerhouse, it along with Canada and the United States, could from a strong North American Trio, originally envisioned when the NAFTA was signed into law, back in the 1990s. 

Kristin Mandsager San Bento's curator insight, March 1, 10:00 PM

The MINT countries aren't that surprising.  After China purchased some of the US debt, it really opened my eyes to who the new powerhouse is.  Mexico could certainly be another powerful country if they could get their act together.  It will be interesting to see the shifts taking place in the next 20 years.  

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Starry Night: Illuminated Bike Paths Light the Way for Dutch - NBC News

Starry Night: Illuminated Bike Paths Light the Way for Dutch - NBC News | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
The world's first glow-in-the-dark cycle path, designed by Daan Roosegaarde was unveiled in the Netherlands earlier this week. The path, made of thousands of...
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