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Border Dispute Between China and India Persists

Border Dispute Between China and India Persists | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
A standoff between troops along a disputed border has entered a third week, causing alarm in New Delhi.
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Out of Africa – Did the Colonial Powers ever Really Leave?

Out of Africa – Did the Colonial Powers ever Really Leave? | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
Africa may have achieved independence, but the old colonial ties are still important as France’s decision to send troops to Mali to fight Islamist extremists shows.

Via Seth Dixon
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Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, March 19, 7:27 AM

This infographic was very interesting.  By using color coding it highlights the areas of influence the colonel powers still maintain over their old possessions.  This map is helpful in understanding how this affects the politics of theses regions today.

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, March 25, 9:59 AM

Colonial ties are still very prevalent due to Europe's dependence upon the resources of Africa. European countries like England and France invest billions in Africa, not to help those African nations, but to build infrastructure for resource extraction or to keep governments stable. Though the true exploitation of Africa has ended, the current situation certainly has the ring of exploitation as the people of Europe enjoy the diamonds and chocolate harvested by the multitudes of impoverished people of Africa.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 1:04 PM

Colony powers are still located within Africa. Just because Africa is technically independent doesn't mean that British Colonial power isn't still in place.

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Regions of Interaction

Regions of Interaction | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
Put away that old Rand McNally map — it's time for a new way to see what America really looks like.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 17, 2013 3:25 PM

There is a great series of maps in this NPR article that show that internal political divisions do not always line up with actual regional interactions.  The map of the United States shows the what money flows within regions that do not always follow state borders (see Wisconsin, Idaho and Pennsylvania).  The map of Great Britain shows the connections based on telephone calls.

 

TagsUSA, UK, borders, mapping, regions.

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New York's Changing Skyline

New York's Changing Skyline | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 26, 2013 12:55 PM

I love this visualization of New York City's evolving skyline from 1876-2013.  The urban landscape of America's prominent cities has changed dramatically. 


Tags: historical,urbanarchitecture, landscape, NYC.

Louis Culotta's comment, May 1, 2013 8:32 AM
I wonder if the tallest building in the first picture is the first stage of the Brooklyn Bridge??????
Louis Culotta's curator insight, May 1, 2013 8:35 AM

if you look at the first picture...it looks like the tall building on the water could be the first stage of the Brooklyn Bridge...any suggestions to this?

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Stray Dogs Master Moscow Subway

Stray Dogs Master Moscow Subway | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it

"Every so often, if you ride Moscow's crowded subways, you may notice that the commuters around you include a dog - a stray dog, on its own, just using the handy underground Metro to beat the traffic and get from A to B.  Yes, some of Moscow's stray dogs have figured out how to use the city's immense and complex subway system, getting on and off at their regular stops."


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Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, February 18, 8:25 PM

This article shows how intelligent some dogs are. They are adapting to the environment around them and figuring out how to survive within the city. I give them credit, as I am sure they have their tactics to survive, whether its begging for food or traveling subways to look for food. 

Jess Deady's curator insight, April 30, 5:46 PM

Dogs are creatures of habit. They get on at one stop and off at another every day or every so often. This is because there is an abundance of stray dogs and since no one is taking them in, Moscow will continue to have interesting subway surfers among them.

Paige Therien's curator insight, May 4, 8:06 AM

Humans commonly think of themselves as separate from nature.  However, we very much are a part of it and animals, like these stray dogs, know it.  When dealing with something more powerful than yourself, you have to learn how to navigate the system in order to survive.  That is exactly what these dogs have done, literally and figuratively, by learning the complex subway systems in Moscow.  It is an example of how animals can adapt to their man-made surroundings and how persistent (the rest of) nature can be.

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What the world eats -- a week's worth of groceries

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Jen-ai's curator insight, May 1, 2013 7:03 AM

!  This is so informative.  

Laurie Diamond's curator insight, May 3, 2013 6:03 AM

An interesting look and different cultures

Samuel Yeats's curator insight, May 7, 2013 9:40 PM

Q1) How does this slideshow depict the differing socioeconomic situations of countries around the world? (Use the example of at least 2 countries)

Q2) Do you think that the image of an Australian weekly diet is accurate to your own family and why?

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The Rights and Wrongs of Slum Tourism

The Rights and Wrongs of Slum Tourism | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
Researchers are heading to Dharavi, Mumbai, to study the impact of slum tours on the residents.

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Ana Cristina Gil's curator insight, November 6, 2013 5:36 PM

I don’t find nothing right about tourist visiting the slum, I feel that the tourist are violating there privacy. They are human being not some historical landmark. If the tourist are not helping this people why are they going? If you are going to visit this places do it because you want to help them, not because you think is interesting their way of living.

Cam E's curator insight, April 1, 8:57 AM

Moral questions are always fun. Personally I don't think going to see slums is all that exploitative in itself, but I would make a distinction between guided tours that cost money, and self-directed tours though. In a guided tour you are paying money to walk through a community and view what life is like for those people, but in a self-directed tour you are just another person walking down the streets and viewing whatever you stumble upon. There are plenty of tours within neighborhoods of different economic value the world over, but these tours are scrutinized because the people touring are as wealthy, or less wealthy, than the people living there. I don't think that a poor community changes this dynamic in an immoral way, as the perceptions of which group is superior come from the own minds of those who feel uncomfortable with it.

 

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, April 10, 6:41 AM

This article rises in interesting question.  Are tours of slums exploitive or beneficial to the slum dwellers?  On the one hand the tours could feel like exploitation and the tourist is viewing attractions at a “zoo”, on the other hand it brings people far removed from slum life in contact with it and can change people’s point of view on the slums.  It can be beneficial if the tour guides donate money to the slums or jobs are sought by slum dwellers to become tour guides.  The question is should slums be hidden away from view or opened up to tourists so that they can see the hardships first hand.  I think that this is an issue that is not clearly black or white; there are many shades of gray involved in this issue.

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A Difficult Choice for Turks in Germany

A Difficult Choice for Turks in Germany | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
Unlike their E.U. counterparts, children of Turkish immigrants have to choose their nationality by the age of 23 or they will lose their German passports.

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The Geography of Chechnya | Geography Education

The Geography of Chechnya | Geography Education | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
The Caucasus region, dominated by the imposing Great Caucasus mountain range and stretching between the Black Sea and the Caspian Sea, has long been known as one of the world’s ethnically and linguistically most diverse areas.

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Peoples, Languages and Genes in the Caucasus: An Introduction

Peoples, Languages and Genes in the Caucasus: An Introduction | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
The Caucasus region, dominated by the imposing Great Caucasus mountain range and stretching between the Black Sea and the Caspian Sea, has long been known as one of the world’s ethnically and linguistically most diverse areas.

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5 pairs of countries that Americans confuse

5 pairs of countries that Americans confuse | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
Newsflash: The Czech Republic is not the same as the Russia region of Chechnya

Via Mr. David Burton
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America's Most Polluted Cities - 24/7 Wall St.

America's Most Polluted Cities - 24/7 Wall St. | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
RTT News
America's Most Polluted Cities
24/7 Wall St.
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Is Google more powerful than some nations? - The Randolph Guide

Is Google more powerful than some nations? - The Randolph Guide | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
Is Google more powerful than some nations?
The Randolph Guide
Through the unit, Google has collaborated with state authorities to dismantle what it calls illicit networks, such as drug cartels and human trafficking, and worked with the U.S.
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Copycat Architecture Rises in China's Building Boom

China's rapid urbanization has fueled an enormous building boom. According to the Economist Intelligence Unit, China has built housing equivalent to roughly ...
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APHG Study App

APHG Study App | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it

"App4Success APHuG is an intuitive app for students to excel in AP Human Geography. Created by two students who scored 5 on all their AP Exams, the app is organized by the topics* indicated by the College Board."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 15, 2013 12:20 PM

I'm not an iPhone or iPad user, but this $1.99 app has received good reviews from within the APHG communities.  Please share in the comments section any feedback. 

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For Chinese Women, Marriage Depends On Right 'Bride Price'

For Chinese Women, Marriage Depends On Right 'Bride Price' | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it

"China's one-child only policy and historic preference for boys has led to a surplus of marriageable Chinese men. Young women are holding out for better apartments, cars and the like from potential spouses...30 to 48 percent of the real estate appreciation in 35 major Chinese cities is directly linked to a man's need to acquire wealth — in the form of property — to attract a wife."

 

Tags: gender, folk culture, China, podcast, culture, population.


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Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, April 10, 7:54 AM

With the new gender imbalance, it is interesting that Chinese families now see boys as the gender that will cost them more money in the long run, it used to be the girl that was a finical burden.  This is a big change in thinking from just a generation ago, it will be interesting to see how this plays out in china over time.

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, April 12, 8:11 AM

This article shows how the One Child Policy has skewed the gender balance in China. There is a shortage of young women and, in order to attract a wife, young Chinese men feel the need to acquire more wealth to gain a competitive advantage in a China with a surplus of men. This wealth grab is possibly fueling the housing market in China, but Chinese women are not seeing many benefits for themselves. The wealth of their husbands tends to be left in the husband's name, leaving women out of the growing economy of China.

 

There is another potential issue as well. The Chinese men are taking out loans to pay for inflated housing prices. If the housing market crashes, these marriage seeking men are left with significant debt for apartments which were overvalued to begin with.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 6:34 PM

This article is recent too which is scary. Men should be able to pick their own brides and money shouldn't be involved. Women shouldn't have to marry someone for the sake of her family but if thats what she wants to do then fine. Different countries operate different ways and in China, this is how they work.

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Chechnya: 200 years of background in four minutes


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Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, February 18, 12:13 PM

Chechnya is an area of terror, death and conflict. The best way to understand a country such as Chechnya is to look into their background. This YouTube clip shows a brief summary of Chechnya's background and why things have gotten so bad.

Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, February 19, 3:15 PM

It appears Russia and Chechnya have a violent past. Chechnya, although small in size, wants to be a country. As a result, some people of Chechnya perform acts of terror to show they are serious about becoming a country. Even today tensions between the two areas remain high.

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, March 3, 6:33 AM

This video gives a good background to understand Chechnya.  The dislocation and genocide that the people had to suffer under Soviet Russia certainly has led to the violence in the region.  We are not separate from our pasts and if anything this video explains where that violence and hatred comes from.  It doesn't excuse the violence but it does explain it.

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Exploring the Brain’s GPS

Exploring the Brain’s GPS | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
May-Britt and Edvard I. Moser are exploring the way the brain records and remembers movement in space, which they speculate may be the basis of all memory.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 30, 2013 1:26 PM

This is more neuroscience than it is geography, but it is incredibly relevant to geographers and spatial analysis.  These Norwegian neuroscientists are charting the brain to understand how we remember where we have been, where we are and how we navigate through space.  They are primarily mapping out the brains of rats, but much of what they’ve discovered appears to hold for all mammals.  There are certain cells that are only active when you are in certain places.  These cells interact as a network in a grid pattern,  forming a very regular hexagonal pattern (central place theory!?!).  These ‘place cells’ or ‘grid cells’ store information about distances and directions and are crucial to navigation.  Read more about it in this article or watch this 6-minute video

 

Tags: spatial, mental maps.

  

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APHG Review Guides

APHG Review Guides | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 2, 2013 10:16 AM

It's that time of year to really buckle down; several teachers have created PDFs versions of review guides for the May 17th AP Human Geography test.  James Nelsen, a veteran APHG teacher has produced a “grand review.”  This resource intentionally does not come with a key to force the students to delve deeper and search for the answers themselves.  Allison Hunt had her students create their own study guide for the APHG test focusing on the ‘big ideas.’  Best of luck and these and other resources are archived on my "thematic" tab on http://geographyeducation.org.

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The Names Behind The States

The Names Behind The States | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it

An infographic of the etymology and cultural origins of the names that made the United States of America.


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Seth Dixon's comment, May 6, 2013 12:21 PM
@Carly, Texas is also inaccurate...
Francisco Javier 's curator insight, May 12, 2013 5:52 PM

The Names Behind The States | @scoopit via @APHumanGeog http://sco.lt/...

Aulde de Barbuat's comment, May 18, 2013 4:08 AM
quite interesting, thanks. Unhappily, the link seems broken..Do you happen to have another one?
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Brazil immigrants face long wait at border town

Brazil immigrants face long wait at border town | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
The BBC's Joao Fellet reports from near Brazil's border with Peru and Bolivia where an influx of immigrants has triggered a "social emergency".

Via Mr. David Burton
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In tiny Lesotho, Chinese immigrants set up shop

In tiny Lesotho, Chinese immigrants set up shop | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
Several thousand Chinese now work in the mountainous southern African nation as shopkeepers and traders, but some claim their presence undercut local entrepreneurs.

Via Mr. David Burton
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Can cashews reduce Senegal poverty?

Can cashews reduce Senegal poverty? | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
Could the humble cashew nut hold the key to eradicating poverty in Senegal's Casamance region? (VIDEO: Can cashews reduce #Senegal poverty?

Via Mr. David Burton
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World Languages Mapped by Twitter

World Languages Mapped by Twitter | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
Twitter is a linguist's dream come true: it compiles millions of messages in hundreds of languages daily, making the question "Who speaks what languages where?" easy to answer.
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AP Human Geography ALL TERMS flashcards | Quizlet

AP Human Geography ALL TERMS flashcards | Quizlet | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
Vocabulary words for AP Human Geography ALL TERMS. Includes studying games and tools such as flashcards. (May 17 is the #APHG exam. What are you doing to prep for the test?
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