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The World’s 10 COOLEST Car Parks

The World’s 10 COOLEST Car Parks | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it

Parking garages generally have a bad reputation – particularly now that cars are seen as such an environmentally unfriendly way to travel, not to mention the fact that they are often unattractive utilitarian structures. To counteract this common perception, the website Stress Free Airport Parking has launched an award for the World’s Coolest Car Park. Read on after the break to find out which 10 parking structures have been shortlisted for the top award.


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What You Need to Know About the Ebola Outbreak

What You Need to Know About the Ebola Outbreak | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
Questions and answers on the scale of the outbreak and the science of the Ebola virus.

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Raven Blair's curator insight, August 21, 10:10 AM

I believe that the reason the Ebola outbreak was so bad in West Africa was because of the overpopulation and lack of medical resources. Attempts of containing the virus are being made by asking for the travel history of anyone that comes into the US with a fever. If they had been to West Africa, then they are screened and tested. Alarms have been raised in New York City at 3 hospitals, but no Ebola cases have turned up.

 

~Raven Blair

Robert Hardy Simpkins's curator insight, August 21, 10:16 AM

The Ebola virus is a very frightening virus. The fact that there is a chance it could spread to the United States is also scary. Hopefully there will be a cure found for this virus. The side effects of Ebola could be fatal, until there is a cure we should prevent to many trips to areas near West Africa.

Alex Lewis's curator insight, August 27, 9:53 AM

More than 2,600 people in Guinea, Liberia, Nigeria and Sierra Leone have become infected with the Ebola virus since March. The Ebola Virus is spreading rapidly between not only African and less developed countries, but also being transported to some more developed countries, such as the United States. There are so many different things we have to bring attention to, this included. The people in Africa are transferring the disease more rapidly, in my opinion, due to the lack of medical attention and the lack of space and resources.

                                     Alex Lewis

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Time-Space Compression

Time-Space Compression | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
In this age of fast travel and instant digital communications, we tend to forget that not so long ago, distances were subjectively very different.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, December 14, 2012 4:17 PM

This series of maps shows the great leaps and bounds that were made during the 19th century in transportation technology in the United States.  This impacted population settlement, economic interactions and functionally made the great distances seem smaller.  This is what many call the time-space compression; the friction of distance is diminished as communication and transportation technologies improve.  


Questions to Ponder: When someone says they live "10 minutes away," what does that say about how we think about distance, transportation infrastructure and time?  How is geography still relevant in a world where distance appears to becoming less of a factor?  

 

Tags: transportation, models, globalization, diffusion.

geofoodgraz's curator insight, December 15, 2012 4:35 AM
Seth Dixon, Ph.D.'s insight:

"This series of maps shows the great leaps and bounds that were made during the 19th century in transportation technology in the United States.  This impacted population settlement, economic interactions and functionally made the great distances seem smaller.  This is what many call the time-space compression; the friction of distance is diminished as communication and transportation technologies improve.  

 

Questions to Ponder: When someone says they live "10 minutes away," what does that say about how we think about distance, transportation infrastructure and time?  How is geography still relevant in a world where distance appears to becoming less of a factor?  "

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Charting culture

"This animation distils hundreds of years of culture into just five minutes. A team of historians and scientists wanted to map cultural mobility, so they tracked the births and deaths of notable individuals like David, King of Israel, and Leonardo da Vinci, from 600 BC to the present day. Using them as a proxy for skills and ideas, their map reveals intellectual hotspots and tracks how empires rise and crumble. The information comes from Freebase, a Google-owned database of well-known people and places, and other catalogues of notable individuals. The team is based at the University of Texas at Dallas."


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MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 10:47 AM

APHG-U3

wereldvak's curator insight, August 13, 10:00 AM

Geografische concepten als stedelijke ontwikkeling en diffusie patronen worden zichtbaar. Primate city en rank-size rule.....en demografische veranderingen in gebeiden.

Stewie Clock's curator insight, August 27, 9:25 PM

Hi it's one of your students try to guess who it is��

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Border Economies: the Maquiladora Export Landscape

Border Economies: the Maquiladora Export Landscape | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it

Maquiladoras are a well-known example of developed countries outsourcing factory work that is cited as a factor leading to de-industrialization in the Northeastern USA.  While many geography classes discuss this macro spatial reorganization, this link challenges us to look at the micro spatial systems of maquiladoras that make them economically efficient.  Some good graphs, maps and images.  


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Derek Ethier's comment, September 20, 2012 10:15 PM
Developed countries outsourcing jobs has become largely beneficial for developing countries. In the case of Mexico, the residents are given new opportunities in manufacturing jobs that they may have never had before. The industrialization of the border area can only lead to increasing development and hopefully a better standard of living for citizens. Unfortunately, it has the exact opposite effect on the U.S., which is giving away jobs.
Joshua Choiniere's comment, September 26, 2012 11:14 AM
This article is displaying the postive and negative side effects that these Maquiladoras have upon the development of stronger economic economies for such countries as Mexico. These buisnesss that invest in the border of Mexico allow these towns/cities to grow and become industrilized. This provides low skill work for the people of Mexico but the logistics of the companies are still being done in the country that has invested in these places. This is good because it lets countries like the United States keep educated/high paying jobs in the States. The negative aspect is that the only jobs the Mexicans recieve are the low paying uneducated type. However still it has postives for both countries and its something we must get used to because its the way of the future.
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How Pandemics Spread

View Full Lesson on TED-ED BETA: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/how-pandemics-spread In our increasingly globalized world, a single infected person can board a pl...

 

This is a great demonstration of why spatial thinking is critical to so many fields, including medicine.

 

Tags: diffusion, medical, historical, spatial.


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Global Perceptions of the United States

Global Perceptions of the United States | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
Placeholder for the Pew Global Indicators Database

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Adilson Camacho's curator insight, February 22, 12:18 AM

Images...

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, March 19, 4:25 PM

Kenya is measure as a parter and alliance with the United States for instance, in the Fall of 2009 a report came out and it proved taht 89% thought of Kenya as an alliance. Shockingly enough in 2013 the alliance with Africa drew at a small decrease of 79%.

MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 8:05 PM

APHG-U1 & U3

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Cartographic Anomalies: How Map Projections Have Shaped Our Perceptions of the World

Cartographic Anomalies: How Map Projections Have Shaped Our Perceptions of the World | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it

Elizabeth Borneman explores how cartography and cartographic projections help and hinder our perception of the world.

"How do you think the world (starting with our perceptions) could change if the map looked differently? What if Australia was on top and the hemispheres switched? By changing how we look at a map we truly can begin to explore and change our assumptions about the world we live in."

 

Geography doesn’t just teach us about the Earth; it provides ways for thinking about the Earth that shapes how we see the world.  Maps do the same; they represent a version of reality and that influences how we think about places. 

 

Tags: mapping, perspective.


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CHS AP Human Geography's curator insight, August 14, 5:30 PM

Use as small cards that students can sort in small groups?  Post as gallery walk?  Skill builder to identify areas of distortion (shape, area, distance, etc)?  

YEC Geo's curator insight, August 15, 10:03 AM

I love maps, but it's easy to forget that reproducing a three-dimensional object on a two-dimensional surface involves many trade-offs.  This article highlights those trade-offs.

Lindley Amarantos's curator insight, September 5, 9:28 AM

Would you perception of the world change if you saw it upside down?

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Along Virginia’s Route 15, the South’s cultural border displays a political divide

Along Virginia’s Route 15, the South’s cultural border displays a political divide | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
Along Virginia’s Route 15, the intensity of the election season makes for tricky relationships.


Where is the division between the North and the South?  How might this produce distinct cultural landscapes?  How does this impact politics? 


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Fried Chicken In Ulan Bator: KFC To Open In Mongolia

Fried Chicken In Ulan Bator: KFC To Open In Mongolia | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
Would you like home-style biscuits or mashed potatoes to go with your yurt?

No country is out of reach for global food brands these days, and

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 13, 2013 1:59 PM

Globalization has a long reach indeed. 

Mr Ortloff's curator insight, October 10, 2013 11:53 AM

Diffusion....Globalization....transnational corporations Oh My!

CT Blake's curator insight, August 29, 7:14 PM

Cultural diffusion in action.

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Monsanto threatens to sue the entire state of Vermont

Monsanto threatens to sue the entire state of Vermont | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
Lawmakers in Vermont are looking to regulate food labels so customers can know which products are made from genetically modified crops, but agricultural giants Monsanto say they will sue if the state follows through.

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Gregory S Sankey Jr.'s curator insight, October 24, 2013 1:24 PM



Vermont has a strong agricultural history and allot of their local economy is based off of their agricultural movement, which has been trending towards sustainable and organic growing methods. The people of Vermont care very much where their food comes from and what is in their food, hence the push for GMO labeling. I think other states would absolutely follow suit if Vermont wins it's case against the agri-business giant monsanto, but that's a big IF. I think that if there were labeling all across the US either these companies would drastically change their business models or ship them overseas to developing nations that have food security issues of their own,  

Ana Cristina Gil's curator insight, November 6, 2013 6:40 PM

I don’t think that there is a specific reason on why  Vermont is the first state to make some headway in producing this type of legislation, Vermont used to pride themselves on being one of the states with a large numbers of organic farms. And with a company like Monsanto whom use GMO on their product, it doesn’t go well with Vermont image. I do think that other states will follow suit because using Genetically Modified Organisms(GMO) and Genetically Engineered (GE) affect our help and Vermont cannot fight this big corporation by themselves. I feel that even though requiring labels on products that contain GMO is a good thing for us the consumers to know Exactly  what we are giving to ur family. I do think that is going to be a bad impact. because this big corporations like Monsanto is a good source of employment for the states. If they feel that the can make their product, they are going to take their business else where.

Blake Welborn's curator insight, February 27, 11:30 AM

If monsanto can win a course a battle saying they don't have to represent their GMO's on products, then they will be able to win in other places which will further murk up the waters of GMO presentation.

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Baseball Fans SUPER ANGRY Hispanic American Superstar Sang 'God Bless America' at All-Star Game

Baseball Fans SUPER ANGRY Hispanic American Superstar Sang 'God Bless America' at All-Star Game | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it

Last night was the 2013 MLB All-Star game. and New York born, United States citizen of Puerto Rican descent, Marc Anthony sang God Bless America.  Let's just say not everyone that that was appropriate.


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Treathyl Fox's comment, July 20, 2013 4:36 PM
There are a lot of people who say God bless America who are not American. Tell the truth. Whoever asked the question is just funning with US. Huh?
Maria Carmen King's curator insight, July 24, 2013 5:15 PM

Read this and see how many retrogade people are still in this country.

They don't know yet what is this country was founded on. 

Maria Carmen King's comment, July 24, 2013 5:19 PM
I am amazed of the ignorance of many people still in this country.
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The Decline of Detroit in Five Maps

The Decline of Detroit in Five Maps | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it

"Detroit was once the nation’s fourth most-populous city. Today, it became the largest American city to file for bankruptcy."

 

"And no discussion of Detroit is complete without mention of race and segregation. In 1950, when Detroit's population was at its peak, the city was 82 percent white. After decades of white flight, that number is reversed: the city is now 82 percent black and 10 percent white. On the map below, Detroit's city limits are obvious—especially its northern boundary, along the infamous 'Eight Mile Road.'"


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A/Prof Jon Willis's curator insight, August 6, 2013 6:30 PM

This is an intereseting technique to demonstrate population dynamics across time - wondering what an Indigenous population map of Brisbane during the last 30 years would look like ...

Jay Ratcliff's curator insight, August 8, 2013 7:35 AM

I like the article because once I got to the New York Times site, I could see my city's stats.

http://projects.nytimes.com/census/2010/explorer

Jay Ratcliff's comment, August 8, 2013 7:38 AM
I did not think that they showed the time aspect very clearly. I would have like to see more data from 1950 or any data before 2005. The article talks about the decline from the 50's but does not show much from that time period.
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Germany Fights Population Drop

Germany Fights Population Drop | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
As German towns work to hide the emptiness, demographers say a similar fate awaits other European countries, with frightening implications for the economy.

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Adilson Camacho's curator insight, August 17, 2013 8:55 PM

Yes, identity!

Holly Hough's curator insight, December 8, 2013 3:35 PM

Germany is undergoing a population crisis. The population is plunging due to a high number of elderly people (the dependency ratio is 1:4) and the desire of women to be in the workforce. As a result, the women are not having children. There is a large number of young people who have obtained educations, but are unable to find work, which makes them less likely to want to have kids and start a family. This is a push factor for them to immigrate to another country where they can find work. This leaves Germany with higher dependency ratios and pushes them further towards economic crisis. Germany and many other European countries are offering incentives to women to have children, such as 24 hour child care, tax breaks, and money for married couples. Some fear fertility rates have fallen below replacement level. Just what will Germany do, “part of the solution lies in remaking values, customs and attitudes in a country that has a troubled history with accepting immigrants.” Germany will have to work to pull immigrants to their country to regenerate their population. Who knows where Germany will be 50 years from now?

Sarah Ziolkowski's curator insight, December 31, 2013 11:05 AM

This article applies to how values and preferences impacts an area. For Germany, their low birth rates are being caused by highly valuing  single mothers and discouraging immigrants to stay in their country.  These  unfavorable birth rates may be a future for many other highly developed countries, or already are a part of many countries. This could happen to your home, so your values or preferences may be come a problem to the economy. Low birth rates and unwelcomed immigration are causing decreased work force and increased demand in Germany, that they can't fulfill. It also causes an uneven population between the young and old population. 

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Currywurst on the Street

Currywurst on the Street | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
Michael Slackman, The Times's Berlin Bureau Chief, looks into the city's obsession with a popular street dish that combines sausage, ketchup and curry powder.

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Courtney Burns's curator insight, November 1, 2013 1:13 PM

I found this video to be very interesting. The video talks about Berlin's signature dish the currywurst. Currywurst is one of most well known dishes in Berlin, and is a dish the natives say every tourist should try. What was interesting to find was that the dish had elements from a few different places. Currywurst is made of pork sausage which and fried and cut into pieces. Pork suasage is a very widely used and popular meat that have in germany. However on the curry worst dish they put ketchup, which is very american like. They also sprinkle it with curry, which comes by way of India from Great Britian. It is amazing ti me that a country's signature dish has ingredients from two other countries! You would think that a signature dish would be made entirely of ingredients from their homeland. However the country is becoming more and more like other country adding sushi bars, soup kitchens, fast food, and etc. It just goes to show how much things have changed. Before country's were trying to use their own products as much as possible. Now we have such good transportation systems that people are moving to new places and food is being transported all over the world. Now we are at a point where even a country's signature dish uses products from many different country's. We have almost completely eliminated folk culture. It is almost sad in a way. 

Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 11, 2013 12:03 PM

All over Germany specially in Berlin you can find many varieties of foods and restaurants that were influenced by many countries all over the world. A very popular dish the currywurst is fried German sausage with American ketchup and India curry powder. This dish was influenced by two other countries and was opular during WWII. The dish is still very popular today because of its unique taste. 

Jacqueline Landry's curator insight, December 15, 2013 10:44 AM

This is a stride of different cultures,  a little ancient and modern culture. When the Turkish immigrant came over to Germany because they needed workers (Germans stopped having so many kids) it help form the curry wurst. They also use American ketchup because Americans were over there for the war and they ate this too. The curry powder came way of United Kingdom. Basically the population learned from all these cultures and  created one huge hit. 

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Currywurst on the Street

Currywurst on the Street | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
Michael Slackman, The Times's Berlin Bureau Chief, looks into the city's obsession with a popular street dish that combines sausage, ketchup and curry powder.

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Courtney Burns's curator insight, November 1, 2013 1:13 PM

I found this video to be very interesting. The video talks about Berlin's signature dish the currywurst. Currywurst is one of most well known dishes in Berlin, and is a dish the natives say every tourist should try. What was interesting to find was that the dish had elements from a few different places. Currywurst is made of pork sausage which and fried and cut into pieces. Pork suasage is a very widely used and popular meat that have in germany. However on the curry worst dish they put ketchup, which is very american like. They also sprinkle it with curry, which comes by way of India from Great Britian. It is amazing ti me that a country's signature dish has ingredients from two other countries! You would think that a signature dish would be made entirely of ingredients from their homeland. However the country is becoming more and more like other country adding sushi bars, soup kitchens, fast food, and etc. It just goes to show how much things have changed. Before country's were trying to use their own products as much as possible. Now we have such good transportation systems that people are moving to new places and food is being transported all over the world. Now we are at a point where even a country's signature dish uses products from many different country's. We have almost completely eliminated folk culture. It is almost sad in a way. 

Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 11, 2013 12:03 PM

All over Germany specially in Berlin you can find many varieties of foods and restaurants that were influenced by many countries all over the world. A very popular dish the currywurst is fried German sausage with American ketchup and India curry powder. This dish was influenced by two other countries and was opular during WWII. The dish is still very popular today because of its unique taste. 

Jacqueline Landry's curator insight, December 15, 2013 10:44 AM

This is a stride of different cultures,  a little ancient and modern culture. When the Turkish immigrant came over to Germany because they needed workers (Germans stopped having so many kids) it help form the curry wurst. They also use American ketchup because Americans were over there for the war and they ate this too. The curry powder came way of United Kingdom. Basically the population learned from all these cultures and  created one huge hit. 

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Indo-European Languages Originated in Anatolia, Biologists Say

Indo-European Languages Originated in Anatolia, Biologists Say | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
Evolutionary biologists say the first speakers of what would become the Indo-European languages were probably farmers in what is now Turkey — a conclusion that differs by hundreds of miles and thousands of years from a longstanding linguistic theory.

 

This research potentially can explain much about the geography of languages and the distribution of cultural groups in Eurasia. 


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Kampe Kyle's curator insight, May 27, 11:33 PM

In AP Human Geo., this relates to the concept of language, language diffusion, and philological history, as it dates all of the languages of Europe back to a unified whole in the past wherein one language in Anatolia sparked all these other languages to eventually take hold.

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A Sense of Place

A Sense of Place | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
THERE WAS SOMETHING odd about the black car at the junction of Sutter and Hyde Streets. It was an ordinary saloon. Its windows were clear, and it looked in good...

 

Technologies today have allowed us to be digitally connected from anywhere.  This impacts geographic patterns from outsourcing to local businesses that rely on interpersonal communications to connect potential demand with resources.  Some may see this as geography becoming less of a barrier, and consequently, less relevant.  This article in the Economist argues that as these technologies have rendered location more important than ever since they rely on geospatial technologies.  "The reports of the death of distance have been much exaggerated." 

 

Tags: technology, globalization, location, place.


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How language transformed humanity

TED Talks Biologist Mark Pagel shares an intriguing theory about why humans evolved our complex system of language.

 

Why is language such a critical component to human cultures and the technologies that we have created?  Why did linguistic diversity exist in great abundance 500 years ago but is now increasingly shrinking?  What is the future geography of languages on Earth going to look like? 


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Cynthia Williams's curator insight, July 19, 2013 12:27 PM

And if we did choose one language that would be the world standard what would it be?  I would guess that the Western cultures would demand English.  But why should English be the standard?

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Lies Your World Map Told You: 5 Ways You're Being Misled

Lies Your World Map Told You: 5 Ways You're Being Misled | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it

"Unfortunately, most world political maps aren't telling you the whole story. The idea that the earth's land is cleanly divvied up into nation-states - one country for each of the world's peoples - is more an imaginative ideal than a reality. Read on to learn about five ways your map is lying to you about borders, territories, and even the roster of the world's countries."


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Sally Egan's curator insight, June 23, 6:32 PM

Amazing stories on the World's changing Geopolitical status. Current stories about disputed borders, unrecognised territories and  newly declared nations.

Adilson Camacho's curator insight, June 29, 9:41 PM

Nunca é "Toda a Verdade" ... 

MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 7:49 PM

APHG-U1

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Canada on mission to map Arctic, lay claim to broader boundaries

Canada on mission to map Arctic, lay claim to broader boundaries | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
Canada has dispatched two icebreakers to map the Arctic seabed beneath the North Pole to support a bid to extend the country's maritime territory deeper into the waterways at the top of the world.

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Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, August 18, 7:19 PM

Option - marine environments and management

Kevin Barker's curator insight, August 19, 8:53 AM

Canada and Russia have at least one way they will benefit from a warming climate and both are eager to see that they take advantage of it.  Using remote sensing is a way to identify and formalize where is their legitimate claim to territory and resources.  What problems might arise with the retreat of the arctic ice?

MsPerry's curator insight, August 25, 3:30 PM

APHG-Unit 4

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US gun crime map: interactive

US gun crime map: interactive | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
What do the latest US crime figures tell us about gun crime in America? Which states have the most firearms murders, robberies and assaults?

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Heather Ramsey's curator insight, February 5, 2013 12:48 PM

This goes along very well with our thematic mapping assignment (in fact, the data we use came from the same source). You can look at data in several different ways on the map, and it shows that the way we present data can change the message of a map.

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Race and Identity in the Dominican Republic: A Complex Topic (Hannah Loppnow) | Global Knights. Local Daze.

Race and Identity in the Dominican Republic: A Complex Topic (Hannah Loppnow) | Global Knights. Local Daze. | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it

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Jenny Ebermann's curator insight, March 8, 2013 8:24 AM

Interesting!

chris tobin's comment, March 12, 2013 6:01 PM
Just goes to show the long term effects of colonialism on the people and the changes in the government. I was not aware of the Trujillo dictatorship practices or skin tone on ID cards-Thanks
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Sweden shaken as riots continue in immigrant suburbs

Sweden shaken as riots continue in immigrant suburbs | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
Days of rioting have left Sweden searching for answers, wondering what went wrong in a nation welcoming of foreigners and proud of its tradition of tolerance and social equality.

 

It has also spurred a debate about the underlying causes, with some Swedes blaming the perpetrators for failing to integrate and other residents of these suburbs complaining they have been forgotten by mainstream society.


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Lady In Black: 'Burka Avenger' Fights For Pakistan's Girls

Lady In Black: 'Burka Avenger' Fights For Pakistan's Girls | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
Burka Avenger is a new Pakistani kids' show about a mild-mannered teacher who moonlights as a burqa-clad superhero.

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Luisa Pinto's curator insight, August 5, 2013 5:32 AM

Globalização não quer dizer que vamos todos ficar iguais. Nem podia. 

Taryn Coxall's curator insight, August 5, 2013 9:58 PM

"the Burka Avenger" is a new cartoon aired in pakistan aiming to empower pakistani women who wear burkas.

I think this clip is a great resourse for not only empowering pakistani women and girls but to use within the Australian classroom in order to not only expose students to different cultures entertainment but more specifically look at rasism, stereotyoes and different cultures traditons in a fun and enagaging way

Avonna Swartz's curator insight, August 30, 2013 11:15 AM

What do you think of this? Do you think it will have an impact on how women perceive themselves?

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Is the Spanish language white?

Is the Spanish language white? | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it

"As the immigration reform bill hangs in the balance in Congress, it is worth considering the history -- rather, the long histories -- of some of the key issues it tackles. One of them is the status of the Spanish language in the United States and its vexed relationship to the category of whiteness, and to the majority white, English-speaking population."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 10, 2013 10:38 AM

I was initially startling to read this headline in the paper (yes I do occasionally read those when I can get my hands on one for free).  Being a Mexican-American Spanish speaker, I think I might be hyper-sensitive to this issue since the very concept of 'whiteness' has been used as justification for institutionalized discrimination.  Once I got over my immediate defensive reaction, I was able to see that it was a thoughful piece that explored the history of how we think about race in the United States; even if the concept of race is not genetically sound, it still plays a powerful role in how we think about peoples and places.

Treathyl Fox's comment, August 11, 2013 9:43 AM
Is the Spanish language white? (??) Must confess. Would have never thought to ask this question.