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What School Lunches Look Like In 20 Countries Around The World

Here are some pictures of school lunches from around the world. Korea clearly wins this one (Japan would have if it wasn't for that spaghetti).

Via Matthew Wahl, Mrs.Dias
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Matthew Wahl's curator insight, March 6, 2013 10:34 PM

A good look at what students from around th world are eating...different priorities in the USA.

Adrian Bahan (MNPS)'s curator insight, March 11, 2013 11:56 PM

Can you define the wealth of a country by what's in a lunch box?

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What You Need to Know About the Ebola Outbreak

What You Need to Know About the Ebola Outbreak | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
Questions and answers on the scale of the outbreak and the science of the Ebola virus.

Via Seth Dixon
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Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, October 6, 2014 3:11 PM

It's almost ironic that the Western World has chosen to wait so long to get involved and now because of it's spread fear has begun that Ebola might travel to the United States. By not sending aid in a timely fashion the US has allowed the virus to grow to a point that now the US finds itself in danger. To make a historical comparison it's almost akin to the Munich Agreements, France and England chose not to stop a growing and dangerous Germany out of fear of conflict only to find war on their door steps because of it. Why did the western world wait so long? Euro-centric bias or racism? Short sightedness? Regardless of the reason the United States and Western Europe are at risk from a nearly untreatable disease primarily through negligence.

 

Hector Alonzo's curator insight, October 6, 2014 3:23 PM

This article shows how the Ebola virus began to spread in many of the countries on Africa and how likely the virus will arrive in the United States. The virus has crossed many borders in Africa already and, according to the article, has infected five people in the United States, but has been quarantined and is currently being treated.  The Ebola virus outbreak has shown how ill equipped certain parts of the world are, in terms of, having the necessary tools for combating a deadly disease. For example, the article provides a map that shows the areas in Africa are more infected with Ebola than others, illustrating how certain parts of the country are becoming more susceptible to the outbreak than others. So geographically, the Ebola virus has gone from a regional outbreak into a potentially global epidemic, what with the cases in the United States.

Jason Schneider's curator insight, March 9, 3:37 PM

Ebola started in western Africa and it spread overseas to the United States more specifically than any other country. It currently affects over 23,200 people in western Africa. To make sure that Ebola is not being spread throughout the whole United States, eastern United States quarantines any visitors or immigrants from West Africa. Eastern United States seems to have the highest rate of ebola because it is closer to Africa. In that case, it can spread westerly un the United States. Perhaps, it could spread to Canada, Mexico or any other country.

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UN urges global move to meat and dairy-free diet

UN urges global move to meat and dairy-free diet | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it

Lesser consumption of animal products is necessary to save the world from the worst impacts of climate change, UN report says


Via Allison Anthony
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Political Symbolism in the Religious Landscape

This is a great juxtaposition of communal identities. Before becoming a part of Canada, this was the Cathedral of St. James. As a part of the British Empire, places such as Victoria Square became a part of the Montreal landscape. In what appears to me as a symbolic strike back against the British Monarchy's supremacy, this Cathedral is renamed Marie-Reine-du-Monde (Mary, Queen of the World). The fact that the Hotel Queen Elizabeth is looming overhead only heightens the tensions regarding whose queen reigns supreme; this isn't the real issue. The dueling queens served as a proxy for tensions between British political control and French cultural identity in Quebec several generations ago.


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 12, 4:43 PM

I was recently in Montreal; my last few Instagram posts aren't the prettiest pictures of my time in Canada.  I tried to select images that represented geographic concepts and would be the things I'd mention if we were on a walking tour of the city. 


TagsCanadasocial media, urban, economic, images, placeculture, landscape, tourism

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Photos Capture The Joy On Playgrounds Around The World

Photos Capture The Joy On Playgrounds Around The World | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
From the U.K. to Kenya to the West Bank, photographer James Mollison exposes not only inequalities among rich and poor countries, but also the intimate moments that unfold during recess.

Via Allison Anthony
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Esperanto Is Not Dead: Can The Universal Language Make A Comeback?

Esperanto Is Not Dead: Can The Universal Language Make A Comeback? | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
A hundred years ago, a Polish physician created a language that anyone could learn easily. The hope was to bring the world closer together. Today Esperanto speakers say it's helpful during travel.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 1, 1:49 PM

Can an invented language designed to be a Lingua Franca be someone's mother tongue?  Of course it can be, even in the accents might carry some regionalized variations.  


Tags: podcast, languageculturetourism,

Cultural Infusion's curator insight, July 15, 7:58 PM

Are there still people who speak Esperanto? Discover it with us!

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How learning to love geography can help make the world a better place

How learning to love geography can help make the world a better place | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it

"It’s a good time to reflect on what truly inspires us. What gives us, as individuals, our own sense of independence? And how can we apply that sense of joyful independence to help us engage more actively and participate more readily in the world—to make it a better place, even? Cultivating a better geographical and cultural appreciation for the world, in the next generation as well as in our own, is a pretty good place to start."

 

Tags: education, K12, geography education, perspective, worldwide.


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Bonnie Bracey Sutton's curator insight, July 18, 7:50 AM

This is awesome !!!

Luigi Cappel's comment, July 18, 4:08 PM
Great story, perhaps a Montestory. I made the pun because I had a terrible geography teacher. He wasn't interested in his subject and he was there as a job. Consequently whilst I scored high in most subjects, I failed this one. Despite that I have traveled the world many times for business an pleasure, learned many languages, which have seen me learn and appreciate countries and cultures. There are those of us who naturally have high IQ, but I believe all children have a brain that says "feed me and I will flourish". We must have teachers that elicit that.
Kenneth Peterson's curator insight, July 19, 12:59 PM

Montessori shines once again!

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The science of slums - Geographical

The science of slums - Geographical | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
In an edited extract from his new book, Danny Dorling, professor of human geography at the University of Sheffield, argues that the idea of the population bomb is a fallacy and that the human population is checking its rise without the need for a grand plan

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 13, 8:26 AM

This essay is written by a critic of Thomas Malthus and could serve as a bridge to discuss issues in a population unit and an urban unit.  In a nutshell, Dorling feels that that Malthusian-like fears and assumptions about the proliferation of slums are unfounded; this is a good reading that can spark some conversation in a college seminar. 


Tags: declining populations, population, demographic transition model, urban, megacities, squatter.

L.Long's curator insight, July 21, 7:06 PM

mega cities

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Re-Engagement with Cuba: The Strategic Calculus - War on the Rocks

Re-Engagement with Cuba: The Strategic Calculus - War on the Rocks | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
Yesterday’s decision by President Obama to re-establish diplomatic relations with Cuba will be highly controversial domestically, but popular internationally. The normalization of ties between these...
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Gastrodiplomacy: Cooking Up A Tasty Lesson On W...

Gastrodiplomacy: Cooking Up A Tasty Lesson On W... | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
An international relations scholar is using her students' love of food to teach them about global conflicts. It's a form of winning hearts and minds that's gaining traction among world governments.
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35 maps that explain how America is a nation of...

35 maps that explain how America is a nation of... | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
Take a tour through America's immigrant heritage — at its most and least welcoming American politicians, and Americans themselves, love to call themselves "a nation of immigrants": a place where everyone's family has, at some point, chosen to come...
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5 Minutes- Brazilian Culture- AP Human Geography - YouTube

Brazil- a country filled with Religion, Art, and Happiness. The largest country in South America has grown rapidly over that past few years, and the 5 minute...
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Earthweek: A Diary of the Planet - Daily Record

Earthweek: A Diary of the Planet - Daily Record | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
Recent generations of polar bears have been observed moving high into the Canadian Arctic in response to climate change and the melting of Arctic sea ice.
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The secret of black soil - Deutsche Welle

The secret of black soil - Deutsche Welle | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
Every day millions of people around the world literally flush away what could be one of the most valuable resources when it comes to growing food. Environmentalists like Dennis Raetzel are trying to change that.
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Placeness

Placeness | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
I understand placeness to mean everything that has to do with place, so this website is intended to be a sort of place encyclopedia. I hope that it will in due course provide an overview of the myriad ideas and experiences of place and places. Places are directly experienced aspects of the world and are full with diverse meanings, objects, and ongoing activities.

 

Tags: neighborhood, landscape, place. 


Via Seth Dixon
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Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, July 10, 10:57 PM

Interesting reading

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Why India and Bangladesh have the world's craziest border

Why India and Bangladesh have the world's craziest border | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
On July 31st India and Bangladesh will exchange 162 parcels of land, each of which happens to lie on the wrong side of the Indo-Bangladesh border. The end of these enclaves follows an agreement made between India and Bangladesh on June 6th. The territories along the world’s craziest border include the pièce de résistance of strange geography: the world’s only “counter-counter-enclave”: a patch of India surrounded by Bangladeshi territory, inside an Indian enclave within Bangladesh. How did the enclaves come into existence?The enclaves are invisible on most maps; most are invisible on the ground too. But they became an evident problem for their 50,000-odd inhabitants with the emergence of passport and visa controls. Independent India and Bangladesh—part of Pakistan until 1971—each refused to let the other administer its exclaves, leaving their people effectively stateless.According to Reece Jones, a political geographer, the plots were cut from larger territories by treaties signed in 1711 and 1713 between the maharaja of Cooch Behar and the Mughal emperor in Delhi, bringing to an end a series of minor wars.It was partition, the division of India and Pakistan, that turned the enclaves into a no-man’s-land. The Hindu maharaja of Cooch Behar chose to join India in 1949 and he brought with him the ex-Mughal, ex-British possessions he inherited. Enclaves on the other side of the new border were swallowed (but not digested) by East Pakistan, which later became Bangladesh.

 

Tags: borders, geopolitics, political, India, South Asia, Bangladesh.


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Stephen Zimmett's curator insight, July 22, 12:32 PM
Another great scoop by Seth Dixon
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City Centers Are Doing Better than Inner Suburbs

City Centers Are Doing Better than Inner Suburbs | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it

A new report tracks demographic trends across 66 U.S. metro areas.  The report provides comprehensive evidence for Aaron Renn's "new donut" model of cities (pictured in above image, on the right). Renn's model proposes that city centers and outer-ring suburbs are doing well economically, but inner-ring suburbs are struggling with a new influx of poverty."

 

Tags: urban, economic, urban models, APHG.


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Michael Amberg's curator insight, May 26, 11:09 PM

This shows the changes in urban geography and how the world is changing due to all the new technology available now.

Bella Reagan's curator insight, May 26, 11:33 PM

Urban unit

Summary

This article goes in to depth on a newer model on cites called the donut model, as pictured similar to a donut. The donut model was created by Aaron Renn, and it shows urban development recently in cities. The center of the city is grownign economically and falling. There is an influx of people moving in , resulting in an increase of poverty too. Also more educated people are moving in like young newly educated individuals.

insight

The new structure of cities forming is a change from the old. With cities now developing bigger and more industrial, there are many opportunities for people for work in the center of the cit. however, many people may want the jobs but can't get them, so many of those in poverty live in the city centers in search of economic opportunities. It is also interesting to see the status of the people changing the in the city center with that also more young educated people move to city centers, most likely in search of job opportunities. This new way of urban development is modernizing the work system.

Shane C Cook's curator insight, May 27, 8:44 AM

More and more the urban stage is filling and cities are becoming once again the next big thing. After WW2 suburbs became intensively popular but now since a change in personnel views people prefer the city more.

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21 Incredible Photos Of The Places Where One Country Ends And Another Begins

21 Incredible Photos Of The Places Where One Country Ends And Another Begins | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
National borders can change very drastically awfully quickly, and when you see the actual borders you can usually tell a lot about the two (or more) countries there.

Via Allison Anthony
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Allison Anthony's curator insight, July 15, 6:26 PM

Great example of political geography: borders and boundaries.

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American Curses, Mapped

American Curses, Mapped | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it

"Americans love to curse. The question is, which bad words are favored where? Who says “*#@&” the most? Who says “$%*#” the least? Is there a “*#$” belt? (As it turns out, yes: From New York City down to the Gulf Coast.)"

 

Tags: language, culture, diffusion, popular culture, mapping, regions.


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 16, 11:05 PM

If you don't want to hear potty talk, this is not the set of maps on linguistic geography for you...I'm just sayin', you've been forewarned.  An isogloss is a line that separates regions that use different words for the same object/concept.  Thing of isoglosses as linguistic contour lines...are there any swearing isoglosses?  Swearing regions?     

Jamie Strickland's comment, July 21, 3:03 PM
I f-ing love this!
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Urbanization in China

China's citizens are moving from the countryside into cities in record numbers, boosting the economy but making party leaders uneasy

 

Tags: economic, planning, urban, China, East Asia.


Via Seth Dixon
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Nicholas Vargas's curator insight, July 16, 11:30 AM

China is urbanizing rapidly, but at what cost?

 

How is this impacting China's citizens, specifically those that have been relocated?

François Arnal's curator insight, July 17, 4:15 AM
Seth Dixon's insight:

A big portion of China's economic boom the last few decades has been linked to the transformation of what used to be a predominantly agrarian civilization to an economic engine fueled by rapid urbanization.  This 2011 video from the Economist is still highly relevant today.   

 

@Céline

Vincent Lahondère's curator insight, July 18, 9:02 AM

ajouter Votre perspicacité ...

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Human Geography of East Central Europe

Human Geography of East Central Europe | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
Here you can find where to get Human Geography of East Central Europe download.
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Complex International Borders | FCHS AP HUMAN G...

Complex International Borders | FCHS AP HUMAN G... | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
More complex international borders in this follow up to part 1. In this video I look at even more enclaves and exclaves."
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Alien views - Geographical

Alien views - Geographical | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
The tabloids would have us believe that immigrants are taking our houses, our jobs, our school places and our hospital beds. But a close reading of the research reveals another, more nuanced sto
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The Global Cities That Power the World Economy ...

The Global Cities That Power the World Economy ... | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
The latest numbers from the Brookings Institution are a reminder that inequality has a geographic dimension.
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How Y’all, Youse and You Guys Talk

How Y’all, Youse and You Guys Talk | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
What does the way you speak say about where you’re from? Answer the questions to see your personal dialect map.
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Here Are All the Senators Who Do and Don't Believe in Human-Caused Climate Change | WIRED

Here Are All the Senators Who Do and Don't Believe in Human-Caused Climate Change | WIRED | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
United States Senators stood up for what they believed in today—and it wasn’t pretty.
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