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'We’re Not This Alien Group': Chinese Students on Fitting In at U.S. Colleges

'We’re Not This Alien Group': Chinese Students on Fitting In at U.S. Colleges | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it

"Four Chinese students have taken to YouTube to explain the social misunderstandings that block many foreign students—particularly those from Asia—from integrating with the slang-speaking, booze-guzzling Americans."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 4, 2013 4:03 PM

This is a great cultural insight into the social struggles and cultural clashes that Chinese students studying in the United States face on a daily basis.  Adapting, adopting or simply dealing with new cultural norms can be quite difficult.  Especially watch the video linked at the end of the article.    

Holly Hough's curator insight, December 8, 2013 3:19 PM


Would you look at that? Wisconsin makes the news once again, but this time it’s about the Asian students who attend Madison University. Chinese enrollment has increased by 356 percent within the last decade. The cultural and social barriers have made it hard for the Asian students to assimilate into American culture. Here in America, our culture has adopted this idea that Asian people are geniuses and/or “nerds.” In Asian countries there is not a heavy emphasis on partying and drinking booze. As we all know Madison is known as one of the biggest party schools in the world. In China education is the utmost important. They aren’t here to party. This anti-party lifestyle leads to social isolationism. It doesn’t help that the foreign students aren’t accustomed to the version of slang in the english language. They often result to speaking mandarin with the other Chinese students. Aside from the education and language differences, the Chinese women often don’t fit the beauty standards set by the American boys. Coupled together, these cultural differences lead students to feel that they aren’t accepted by their peers. In fact, one in four of the Chinese students drop out of college.  As a result, a group of Chinese students at Madison, have set out on a mission to help their American peers better understand their lives. Hopefully, we will see the dropout rates decline as the Chinese students learn to assimilate and the American students learn to appreciate the Chinese culture.

Hye-Hyun Kang's curator insight, December 8, 2013 11:06 PM

Chinese enrollment has increased by 365 percent but about one fourth of those students don't finish school and go back to China. Major reasons for leaving was not being able to interact and to adjust to American culture. When Americans see Chinese students talking to each other other in Mandarin, they make a comment, "You're in America. You should speak English." Many Chinese students chose to speak Mandarin rather than English because it is their native language. Also, many students that are coming from China learned how to get good grades in American schools not how to communicate in English. In the video, two students point out that yes international students should try their best to improve their language, but they shouldn't feel bad for speaking their own native language. 

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What You Need to Know About the Ebola Outbreak

What You Need to Know About the Ebola Outbreak | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
Questions and answers on the scale of the outbreak and the science of the Ebola virus.

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Alec Castagno's curator insight, October 6, 3:07 PM

A good resource that gives a general outline of the recent Ebola outbreak and its effects on the world. The outbreak comes from a border region with a very weak infrastructure and poor population, which has allowed for Ebola to spread like wildfire. The poor economic state of the area has let Ebola wreak havoc, and the modern level of globalization has allowed for the virus to spread out into the world. We see how Ebola has developed and spread throughout Western Africa, and when compared to American outbreak situation it highlights the deep differences in the capabilities of core and periphery countries.

Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, October 6, 3:11 PM

It's almost ironic that the Western World has chosen to wait so long to get involved and now because of it's spread fear has begun that Ebola might travel to the United States. By not sending aid in a timely fashion the US has allowed the virus to grow to a point that now the US finds itself in danger. To make a historical comparison it's almost akin to the Munich Agreements, France and England chose not to stop a growing and dangerous Germany out of fear of conflict only to find war on their door steps because of it. Why did the western world wait so long? Euro-centric bias or racism? Short sightedness? Regardless of the reason the United States and Western Europe are at risk from a nearly untreatable disease primarily through negligence.

 

Hector Alonzo's curator insight, October 6, 3:23 PM

This article shows how the Ebola virus began to spread in many of the countries on Africa and how likely the virus will arrive in the United States. The virus has crossed many borders in Africa already and, according to the article, has infected five people in the United States, but has been quarantined and is currently being treated.  The Ebola virus outbreak has shown how ill equipped certain parts of the world are, in terms of, having the necessary tools for combating a deadly disease. For example, the article provides a map that shows the areas in Africa are more infected with Ebola than others, illustrating how certain parts of the country are becoming more susceptible to the outbreak than others. So geographically, the Ebola virus has gone from a regional outbreak into a potentially global epidemic, what with the cases in the United States.

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The people with the reddest hair in the world

The people with the reddest hair in the world | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it

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Allison Anthony's curator insight, November 17, 8:58 PM

Guess where they are??

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Political Geography: Asian border disputes

Political Geography: Asian border disputes | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it

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The Top 5 Foreign Policy Lessons of the Past 20 Years

The Top 5 Foreign Policy Lessons of the Past 20 Years | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
From Russia to China to the United States, from hubris to
ultimatums to power plays, the good, the bad, and the ugly of (recent) world
politics. 

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Two Ideas of Israel-Palestine

Two Ideas of Israel-Palestine | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
The killing in a Jerusalem synagogue was vile, and predictable. As Jews know, one day the oppressed fight back.

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Eat: The Story of Food

Eat: The Story of Food | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
Take a tasty journey through history to discover how food shaped our world in Nat Geo’s Eat: The Story of Food.

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Report: China building 'airstrip capable' island in disputed waters

Report: China building 'airstrip capable' island in disputed waters | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
China is building an island in the South China Sea that could accommodate an airstrip in bitterly contested waters, says Jane's Defence Weekly.

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Jake Red Dorman's curator insight, November 25, 11:44 AM

China is building an island in heavily disputed waters in the South China Sea, with many other countries such as Brunei, Malaysia, the Philippines, Taiwan and Vietnam. I kind of take both sides of the story on this dispute and it is hard for me to pick a side to go with on this story. On one hand China is making the land that they are claiming as their own. it as if they found new territory and are the first ones to discover it, but even better, they are making the land. On the other hand though, China is making this new island in, heavily disputed waters with other countries and the areas in dispute include fertile fishing grounds and potentially rich reserves of undersea natural resources. it is hard to go against China on this one but it is also hard not to agree with The other Countries case.   

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The iPhone Economy

The iPhone Economy | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
Apple’s iPhone is a model of American ingenuity, but most of its components are manufactured somewhere else, leading to the decline of other kinds of jobs.

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Pippi Longstocking’s Words to Be Modified for TV

Pippi Longstocking’s Words to Be Modified for TV | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
Pippi Longstocking’s language has become part of a growing and often uncomfortable debate about ethnicity in Sweden.

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Are poor Indian Muslims being forced to convert to Hinduism?

Are poor Indian Muslims being forced to convert to Hinduism? | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
Muslims in India fear increased pressure to convert to Hindu.

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Why Indians love cricket

Why Indians love cricket | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
TO OUTSIDERS, the magnitude of Indians' love for cricket is as incomprehensible as its feverish intensity. On February 4th India awarded the Bharat Ratna, its highest civilian honour, to Sachin Tendulkar, a recently retired batsman. Millions in India, a country of 1.3 billion people and only one nationally-popular game, celebrated wildly. When India's national side plays a big game, an estimated 400m watch on television. Yet cricket's take-off in India is a highly improbable development. The game is demanding to play properly, requiring space, a good turf pitch and expensive equipment—which only a relative handful of Indian cricketers have access to. Most will never strap on pads or bowl with a leather ball. So why do they so love the game?

 

Tags: sport, popular culture, culture, development, India, South Asia, globalization, empire.


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Kaitlin Young's curator insight, December 13, 5:53 PM

Imperialism often leaves its mark, but I doubt anyone expected that cricket would turn into one of the most popular sports in India. Indian does not have a large amount of open land for children to play the game, nor are people financially stable enough to afford the correct gear. Regardless, children make use of what they have and play in the street and the sport remains as a staple of Indian culture. 

Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, Today, 2:56 AM

The fact that Indians love cricket is hardly surprising if you are aware of their colonial past. This article provides that background for those unaware of England's huge effect on the nation. After the conquest of India by the British quickly English language and culture were both spread and forced upon the people of India. The people have adopted these English traits and it has been said that "The last true Englishman will be an Indian".

Alec Castagno's curator insight, Today, 3:19 PM

Cricket has spread throughout India because of its history as a prestigious British sport. The spread of its popularity across India shows how important social factors can influence a population. It was adopted by the Indian elite trying to mimic the British elite, and now has spread to the majority of Indians. The involvement of a Prime Minister shows the importance cricket has in Indian society.

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How cultures around the world make decisions

How cultures around the world make decisions | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
Is the American obsession with individual freedom really such a great idea? What other cultures know about how to make good choices.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 6, 1:16 PM

This article show three distinct cultural approaches to the concept of choice, showing how they shape people and communities and cultural systems.  The three models discussed are:

  • One American model: Give me personal autonomy or give me death.
  • The Amish model: Belonging, not choice, is crucial.
  • One Asian model: Focus on interdependence and harmony, not independence and self-expression.

This TED talk from Malcolm Gladwell is also an interesting exploration into the world of choice and options.


Tagsculture, worldwideTED.

Dennis Swender's curator insight, November 11, 3:31 PM

Decision tilmes, more or less

Scott Langston's curator insight, November 16, 6:26 PM

Culture's influence on decision-making

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Geography of Europe Games

Geography of Europe Games | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 12, 4:57 PM

Toporopa is compilation of different games and app for secondary students to review their geographic knowledge of geography, and learn new concepts in a fun and entertaining way.  It does reinforce the 'encyclopedic' view of geography education, but the games are well-crafted and available in most of the major languages of the European Union.  See a Spanish-language review of the site here.   


Tags: Europe, regions, trivia, games.

Edelin Espino's curator insight, December 13, 2:24 PM

Flags of Europe is definitely my favorite. Really good games to improve my knowledge of the old continent. 

Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, Today, 1:59 AM

I thought that this game was really useful for getting to know all different aspects of Europe. I really like how it was separated into a variety of different categories that focused on different things in Europe. Of course I was familiar with the countries category. Some things that I was not familiar with before finding this game was all the bodies of water in Europe. I am now aware of the different lakes, seas, and rivers in Europe. I thought it was really cool how it went into some real detail and included aspects like the ports, volcanoes, monarchies, and the battles. I definitely was not aware with any of these before seeing this game. I think this is a very useful game if you wish to know more about Europe or maybe even if you're traveling there and want to get some background knowledge.

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A Journey Through The History Of American Food In 100 Bites

A Journey Through The History Of American Food In 100 Bites | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
Thomas Jefferson loved macaroni and cheese so much he brought it home to Virginia from Europe. The American Plate reveals these and other stories behind America's most beloved foods.

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The trouble at Temple Mount

The trouble at Temple Mount | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
THE Temple Mount in Jerusalem is one of the world’s most explosive bits of real-estate. It has started to rumble again in recent weeks, with demands by Jewish...

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The end of the population pyramid

The end of the population pyramid | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it

The shape of the world's demography is changingTHE pyramid is a traditional way of visualising and explaining the age structure of a society."


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Allison Anthony's curator insight, November 18, 7:03 PM

Fantastic animated timeline of population change!

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40 maps that explain food in America

40 maps that explain food in America | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
Where our food comes from, how we eat it, and what we drink to wash it down

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Rich Schultz's curator insight, November 26, 1:45 PM

Only 40 maps to explain it?!

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First World Problems: Japan's Population Decline and Aging Population

First World Problems: Japan's Population Decline and Aging Population | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
Steve Inskeep talks to David Wessel about what's gone wrong with Japan's economy. Wessel is director of the Hutchins Center at the Brookings Institution and a contributor to The Wall Street Journal.

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Plague outbreak in Madagascar kills 40

Plague outbreak in Madagascar kills 40 | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
A plague outbreak in Madagascar has killed 40 people and infected dozens more since August, according to the World Health Organization.

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Challenges in Defining an Israeli-Palestinian Border

Challenges in Defining an Israeli-Palestinian Border | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
There are major hurdles in drawing borders between Israel and a future Palestine.

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It’s official: America is now No. 2

It’s official: America is now No. 2 | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it

The Chinese economy just overtook the United States economy to become the largest in the world.


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Six Ways America Is Like a Third-World Country

Six Ways America Is Like a Third-World Country | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
Our society lags behind the rest of the developed world in education, health care, violence and more

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From burqas to boxing gloves, China’s 75 tips for spotting extremist Muslims

From burqas to boxing gloves, China’s 75 tips for spotting extremist Muslims | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
Police issue list of suspicious activities in restive western province of Xinjiang, including abstaining from alcohol, abusing people who dress fashionably and owning dumbbells and boxing gloves.

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Golden Temple of Amristar

"The Golden Temple is the holiest shrine of the Sikh religion. It is also home to one of the largest free eateries in the world. Read the related article."


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Kaitlin Young's curator insight, December 12, 2:58 PM

Sikh is a religion that is often overlooked, since many people associate Hinduism with India. This Sikh temple is the one of the largest free eateries in the world, serving whoever walks through the door without any sort of discrimination or judgement. The people running the temple so not believe in the caste system, and therefore everyone is able to sit and eat together in peace. This Sikh temple is meant to spread the sense of equality to its visitors.  

Alec Castagno's curator insight, Today, 4:46 PM

Sikhism seems to be a unique blend of Indian geographic facts. The blend of religious factors from Hinduism and Islam, and casts aside the social aspect of Hindu caste structure. The temple seems to stand as a symbol of its blended nature by allowing people from all faiths and treating them as equals.

Wilmine Merlain's curator insight, Today, 6:35 PM

Its a beautiful thing to see a religion such as that of the Sikh who use the temple as a communal gathering for all. It is one that is accepting of all, denying the caste system that the Hindu religion practices. I also like the idea of the serving a free meal for those who come to visit the temple. Rather than excluding those who wouldn't consider themselves a devout Sikh, they disregard that and spend their time making a vegetarian meal together. Its not often you hear or see something of this caliber happening on a day to day basis.

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Cityscapes of Chicago

Cityscape Chicago II is a personal timelapse piece that I have worked on periodically over the past two years. The inspiration behind the project ties similarly with the original piece. As the city of Chicago continues to change, my fascination with it grows as well. The goal for me is always to capture the city in a unique way from new perspectives, and to continue exploring it.

 

Tags: Chicago, urban, place, landscape,  video.


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 12, 8:08 AM

A little closer to my home and workplace, here is a similar video about Providence, Rhode Island.

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How harsh environments make you believe in God (or gods)

How harsh environments make you believe in God (or gods) | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
A new study links climatic instability and a lack of natural resources to belief in moralizing gods in cultures around the world.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 13, 1:58 PM

I’m not posting this in spite of its controversial nature—I am sharing this precisely because it has raised eyebrows.  Many have read this and seen elements of environmental determinism in the cultural analysis of religions (despite the researcher’s insistence that their findings should not be taken as a form of geographical determinism).

While there appears to be a correlation between a belief in moral god(s) and a harsh environment, others could also look at this map and see the mapping of poverty, colonialism or historical evangelism.  Environmental determinism was used to justify colonialism and racist ideologies, geography fully rejected anything with even a hint of environmental determinism.  Geographers are hypersensitive to the critique of environmental determinism; that is why it is difficult to find modern geographic research that knocks on the door of determinism. 


Questions to Ponder: How much environmental determinism is in this research?  What alternatives exist to environmental determinism?  How much of a factor is the environment in shaping cultural patterns? 


Tags: environment, religion, culture,  unit 1 GeoPrinciples.

Scott Langston's curator insight, November 16, 6:25 PM

Inspiring faith? Is God an environmental construct?

Kelli Jones's curator insight, December 2, 1:06 AM

This article talks about how where we live can influence our religion. I couldn't agree more. Although I have been an active member of a church for a long time now I can't help but think that if I didn't live in the US I wouldn't be a Christian. If I were born in China for example I may not even know the name Jesus Christ. That's a scary thought.