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Power Distribution: Unitary, Confederation, and Federal

an easy, graphical way to learn the three forms of government power distribution.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, December 2, 2015 10:06 PM

In the unit on the political organization of space, one of the items listed to understand is the various forms of governance, including unitary, federal, and confederate forms of government.


Questions to Ponder: What are the advantages and disadvantages of each system?  How do this impact the human geography and how does the human geography help to shape these governance systems?  What real world examples can you think of for these categories? 


Tags: APHG, political, governance, unit 4 political, video

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Daylight Saving Time Explained


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 1, 2015 7:00 PM

If you haven't discovered CGP Grey yet, his YouTube channel is a veritable fountain of geographic tidbits.  Day Light Savings (whether you agree with it or not) has to do with fundamental Earth-Sun relationships and have some corresponding spatial patterns of who does or does not follow it.  The tag below links to my archive of his many geographically related videos.   


Tags: CGP Grey.

Charli Wiggill's curator insight, November 2, 2015 6:45 AM

@Jackie Barnard - any use for your geographers?

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Rust Belt Rebirth Through Gentrification?

It’s become difficult to afford urban living in places like San Francisco, New York or even Portland, but there is an alternative. In Rust Belt cities like Pittsburgh, Buffalo and Cincinnati, you can buy or rent for about 1/10th the price.

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Hailey Austin's curator insight, May 11, 2:34 PM
 This is related to what I'm learning in class because its talking about urbanization. It talks about how a man visits a very run down place and invest in fixing it up a bit. He rebuilt a house/building. It made the city look better. My opinion on the article is that its a very good deed. Bringing a city back to life is a wonderful thing. 
Harley Bass's curator insight, May 11, 2:35 PM
This connects to are lesson on chapter thirteen through gentrification. My opinion on this video is that gentrification in this neighborhood is good because it is bringing life back to its local community. Gentrification can be a bad thing in some neighborhoods though because it can force poor families out of their home.
kyleigh hall's curator insight, May 12, 11:21 PM
This article is about a person who bought a house in the suburb areas of New York. He put certain things in his house that is all historically or better for the world. This relates to what we are learning in world cultural geography because we are learning about the suburbs area and inner city areas of places. In my opinion it related to what we learned about a lot also I liked what he did with the stuff he used. 
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How religion(s) spread across the world

How religion(s) spread across the world | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
VIDEO: 5,000 years of religious history in two minutes.

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Clayton Nelson's comment, April 4, 2016 10:09 AM
It is amazing to see how quickly some religions spread compared to others especially once the Islamic religion began. Also i believe its a great thing that during the age of discovery, religions were taken over to the new world with those who traveled there.
Alexis Michelle's curator insight, April 4, 2016 10:11 AM

Short, sweet and to the point--this video is a great way to show the historical geographies of major world religions. Each of these religions have been "born" somewhere and have grown to different countries. Everyone has a religion well most of everyone and I believe it is very important to know the history of the religion that you are or fit into.


Tags: religion, diffusion, culture, Christianity, Islam, Buddhism, Hinduism, Judaism,
unit 3 culture.


Blake Bass's curator insight, April 7, 10:05 AM
This article is very excellent at explaining where religions are and why they are there,this article relates to human geography and what we are learning because it explains the most practiced religions and where they are.
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Changing The World, One Map At A Time

Maps have always been a source of fascination and intrigue. Today's maps, however, can also help to save lives during disasters, document human rights abuses and monitor elections in countries under repressive rule. This presentation will explain how today's live maps can combine crowds and clouds to drive social change.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 20, 2014 1:03 PM

On this day of giving thanks, I want to remind this community that geospatial skills can be used to help othersWant to see geographic knowledge and geospatial skills in action?  Crowd-sourced mapping is increasingly an important resource during an emergency.  Poorer places are often not as well mapped out by the commercial cartographic organizations and these are oftentimes the places that are hardest hit by natural disasters.  Relief agencies depend on mapping platforms to handle the logistics of administering aid and assessing the extent of the damage and rely on these crowd-sourced data sets made by people like you and me. 


Tagsdisasters, mapping, cartographyTED201, video.

Rich Schultz's curator insight, November 28, 2014 2:47 PM

Tedx

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Pro-Natalist Policies

"No one has found out how to help Denmark's falling birth rate. Until now. Spies Travels announces a competition where you have to make a baby to win."


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Jacob Crowell's curator insight, October 27, 2014 10:41 AM

This shows what Pro-Natalism looks like in the 21st century. Youtube videos, and competitions that can go viral and trending. I find it interesting how these policies are trying to gain traction through video campaigns with sexy models and catchy slogans like "Do it for Demark". Population geography can be a key indicator of the characteristics of a country or nation. Denmark knows they need to counter a falling birthrate in order to stay growing this is definatly a modern way of going about that.

Lora Tortolani's curator insight, March 4, 2015 9:58 PM

Sex sells everything, even making babies!

Mark Hathaway's curator insight, October 10, 2015 7:03 AM

This video may be both the greatest and worst television commercial in the history of civilization. I can already imagine a do it for Rhode Island commercial airing sometime in the near future. In all seriousness, this video is aimed at an enormous issue facing Both Europe and Russia. Russia particularly, is suffering terribly. In the aftermath of the collapse of the Soviet Union, the Russian death rate far outpaced the Russian birth rate. The seriousness of such an issue can not be understated. A country can not survive if more people are dying, than being born. Only recently, has the birth rate caught back up to the death rate in Russia. While the death crises may be ebbing in Russia, there is no way to erase twenty years of death.

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International Migration

Almost everywhere on the world, international migration is a hot topic. Most of the time the debate about migration is fierce and charged with prejudices and...

Via Natalie K Jensen, Nancy Watson, Seth Dixon
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Sierra_Mcswagger's curator insight, September 10, 2014 10:02 AM

This video is primarily talking on the widely known topic of migration. 3 percent of the worlds population is living away from there place of birth. The push of migration from places include poverty, war, and environmental disasters. The migration pull in some places are because of  economic opportunity, and political freedom. Migration is increasing, and is thought of as a bad thing.(s.s.)

Aurora Rider's curator insight, October 7, 2014 8:59 PM

This video is great for going over the many different aspects that go along with migration. It talks about what migration is and the reasons why people migrate known as push and pull factors. It talks about the different types of migration such as asylum seakers and illegal immigration. It mentions the disadvantages and advantages of migration.

Katelyn Sesny's curator insight, October 31, 2014 12:27 PM

A great YouTube video- discussing the controversy of international migration among other things that fall into place of the disapproval of international migration. -UNIT 2 

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APHUG Films Presents...

Promotional video for AP Human Geography enrollment

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 17, 2013 4:30 PM

This is video is a great tool to drum up interest in an AP Human Geography course produced by David Burton.  Similar videos and things designed to promote the discipline and it's study can be found under the tag, "geo-inspiration." 


Tags: APHG, geo-inspiration.

Adrian Bahan (MNPS)'s curator insight, May 11, 2013 12:37 PM

I need to show this Day 1 of next school year

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Where the Hell is Matt?


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 9, 2013 10:11 PM

I've seen other "Where the Hell is Matt" videos and this recent one is building on that tradition.  These videos show some fantastic international icons and people around the world.  Simultaneously, this video show the unique cultural elements seen around the world while showing the essential beauty of our common humanity.  Who wouldn't want to go to all the places that Matt has been? 


Tags: geo-inspiration, worldwide, folk culture.

GeoBlogs's curator insight, March 11, 2013 3:41 AM

Where can you send Matt ?

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The Struggle for Jihad

The Struggle for Jihad | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
Two opposing groups battle to define the word jihad on public buses and subways.

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Kimberly Hordern's comment, April 30, 2013 8:07 AM
It is sad that these people are feeling the negative connotations of people who commit crimes under their own definition of the word jihad. When in actuality the word means to Islamic followers a personal struggle.
Conor McCloskey's comment, April 30, 2013 10:27 AM
Islamic cultural has been isolated and generalized in American society after September 11th, 2001. Because of this, the Islamic religion is often misunderstood or misrepresented. There are extremist factions of every religion, even Christian, though sometimes our culture forgets that. This video is about a Muslim organization that is trying to take back the definition of “jihad” in American society. Since 9/11, the world has been synonymous with violence, though many Muslims do not believe their struggle for a better life with God is a violent struggle.
Cultures are multilayer. While some Muslim’s believe jihad is a holy war, others see it as a personal struggle. American culture has a lot to learn about the Muslim cultures through out the world, including the differences between the extremist and non-extremist factions. Extremist factions tend to get the most press coverage and attention from outsiders because they are by name extreme. It would be interesting to see how this relationship with jihad would differ if September 11th never happened.
Zakary Pereira's comment, April 30, 2013 4:31 PM
Before seeing this video I had always thought of a Jihad as a religious war started by radical Muslims. After watching I felt bad personally that I had confused this word with something that many people hold as just a goal or a personal struggle for them. I do not know if it is because post-9/11 there was much anti-Islam and anti-muslim sentiment in the US (still are today) and that the word became a radical term in the United States, I don’t know. I agree with Conor and saying that the reason many people know Jihad as a religious war is because of the media attention that radical Islamists receive when they bomb/hurt/kill and that is hurting the image of Muslims and Jihad in America.
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"The Farmer"

And on the eighth day, God looked down on his planned paradise and said, "I need a caretaker." So God made a farmer. God said, "I need somebody willing to ge...

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 4, 2013 9:29 AM

This Super Bowl commercial for trucks also doubles as a tribute to a rural America of yesteryear in general, and for farmers more specifically.  While some may object to the overtly religious references of video, I feel that it reflects the cultural ethos of the Midwest, but more importantly, the market research shows that this religious appeal would resonate with the truck-purchasing demographic that this commercial is trying to influence.  This commercial was cleverly critiqued in this video, "See God made a (Latino) Farmer" and in this irreverant parody.  


Tags: agriculture, labor, rural, unit 5 agriculture.

Ann-Laure Liéval's curator insight, February 6, 2013 1:04 PM

Religion et société aux EU: un document introductif pour le chapitre, pub du Superbowl 2013, à destination d'un public ciblé... 

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, March 16, 2016 4:03 PM

This Super Bowl commercial for trucks also doubles as a tribute to a rural America of yesteryear in general, and for farmers more specifically.  While some may object to the overtly religious references of video, I feel that it reflects the cultural ethos of the Midwest, but more importantly, the market research shows that this religious appeal would resonate with the truck-purchasing demographic that this commercial is trying to influence.  This commercial was cleverly critiqued in this video, "See God made a (Latino) Farmer" and in this irreverant parody.  

 

Tags: agriculture, labor, rural, unit 5 agriculture.

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Food Machine

Food Machine | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it

UPDATE: The PBS episode "Food Machine" premiered on April 11th, 2012 on the series "America Revealed."  Now the episode is available online. 

 

"Over the past century, an American industrial revolution has given rise to the biggest, most productive food machine the world has ever known.  In this episode, host Yul Kwon explores how this machine feeds nearly 300 million Americans every day. He discovers engineering marvels we’ve created by putting nature to work and takes a look at the costs of our insatiable appetite on our health and environment.  For the first time in human history, less than 2% of the population can feed the other 98%." 


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Adrian Bahan (MNPS)'s curator insight, March 7, 2013 8:46 PM

This is a great video covering our industrial agricultural complex

Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, November 27, 2013 5:13 PM

The Industrial Revolution really changed things, but it is hardly an improvement, because so many people are without the benefits of the rich percentage.  People's roles are becoming solid components that are entirely replacable and part of the machine rather than becoming creative- and by creative, I don't just mean artsy.  I think that the Research and Development part of any machine entity is the part that allows it to adapt and modify in order to change for the better and the greater good.  I look at humans as an alien species inhabiting a planet, and I could make the analogy to a college fraternity.   The planet is a mess, people try to make a buck off each other at every given opportunity, and I particularly dislike that the rich people band together like frat brothers, instead of giving less-priveledged persons the opportunity to attain equal status.  I don't think like everyone else, but I do make efforts to partake in realistic activism to cause change for the betterment of all beings- human or not.  I do believe in predestination, and that everything around us is a material and spiritual echo from the dawn of creation, but I also believe that the flaws present today will disappear tomorrow through courses of events where chosen people will alter the formation of the future, for the benefit of all beings.  Right now, with people undertipping pizza delivery men, and not donating the optional dollar at stop and shop, it is the flawed 'today' phase of the timeline, but the Industrial Revolution has made it easier for society to embrace component roles, however replacable or expendable, and that in the end will achieve greater contentment and universal success.

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Empire, Republic, Democracy: A History of Turkey

"The curriculum 'Empire, Republic, Democracy: A History of Turkey' traces the final years of the Ottoman Empire, the birth of the Turkish Republic, and contemporary issues in Turkey. Learn more at www.choices.edu/turkey "


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 9, 2015 4:49 PM

This video is a great introduction to the Choices Program's new unit on Turkey...a country that is truly a bridge between the Middle East and Europe, without being fully in either.   This unique global position makes Turkey a very important country to understand both culturally and politically.


Tags: politicalculture, Turkeyhistorical.

Matthew Richmond's curator insight, November 23, 2015 2:24 PM

Turkey has always been a country that I find interesting. So many amazing architectural structures and landscapes. I have two friends from high school who work there in the peace corps. I asked them what it's like and they couldn't really describe it. They said it isn't really Arabic but it certainly isn't western either. This was a good introductory video on the area.

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China's Maritime Claims

ONE reason China’s spectacular rise sometimes alarms its neighbours is that it is not a status quo power. From its inland, western borders to its eastern and southern seaboard, it claims territory it does not control.

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Chris Costa's curator insight, November 25, 2015 3:06 PM

Chinese expansion into the South Sea has been a longtime coming, and China's actions in the region are both a reflection of its growing strength and a huge diplomatic headache for the US and every other nation in the region. China's construction of artificial islands allows it to claim autonomy over a larger body of water, challenging the maritime power of every other nation in South East Asia, many of whom have economies reliant on the waters China now claims as its own, some 500 miles away from the Chinese mainland. With the emergence of the Chinese economy as a global power, its ambitious leaders have made plans to transform China from a regional military force to a new superpower- one that the established order, the US included, is entirely unsure of. Which of these nations can truly challenge China's decision to make these waters it's personal pond? It would be economic and political suicide, as China is an enormous global trading power, and has the potential to crush any of these nations in a military engagement. Could Japan? Perhaps, but the Chinese have already pressed ahead with their plans, regardless of Japanese political pressure. Involvement of the US is perhaps the last thing anyone wants- particularly both the US and China- but it is perhaps the only way China will heed pressure from abroad and cease  Chinese expansion in the region. The US and China must be allies, for the sake of global prosperity, but actions like these cannot be tolerated, by either party.

Gene Gagne's curator insight, December 1, 2015 7:51 PM

One reason to care about minor islands is the 200 nautical miles off the coast for the EEZ. This would give china more water territory for drilling of oil which I believe is there in those waters. Flexing more muscle for their navy to grow. Strategically the Chinese could take over these small islands and build air strips for future which would give them a chance to reach places they wouldn't be able to before and this would be good supply transactions during war, fueling, maneuver of man power. The other small countries also would lose their independence and would have to fall under china's rule. With the building of the man made islands and the Chinese navy protecting their people while they continue to build these islands and daring anyone to try and stop them is a sign that china is trying to dominate and expand with muscle. It is their time they have the economic, and military power to do so. Of course they don't want to deal with the u.s. and their allies militarily but it doesn't benefit the u.s. either. I don't believe u.s. wants to get involved in a battle with china and their allies.

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 14, 2015 8:17 PM

Claiming territory it does not control, causes a lot of controversy with other country. The main problem here now is China is having a dispute with Japan about some islands. There could possibly be oil or natural resources.Japan says that the land was always theirs. China clearly likes to just put itself out there and make claims or place oil rigs wherever. This could be a big problem for them because if someone gets too offended by their actions there could end up being a war or some sort of conflict. Especially since they like to use military forces such as navy and air guarding "territory." 

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Amsterdam Canals

It was busy today on the Canals in Amsterdam. Especially at the junction Prinsengracht/Leidsegracht.

 

Tags: Netherlands, transportation, place, neighborhood, landscape, time lapse, video.


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 31, 2015 1:32 PM

Could this transportation network and system work everywhere?  If not, geography and place are critical factors to shaping the human landscape. 

John Lasschuit ®™'s curator insight, August 31, 2015 2:19 PM

Look at how self-organised this works perfectly. It's just a matter of how you can solve things together.

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Food Waste

Producers, sellers, and consumers waste tons of food. John Oliver discusses the shocking amount of food we don’t eat.

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Jose Soto's curator insight, August 5, 2015 9:21 PM

Food waste is a tragedy that we all know happens, but the economic system does not work efficiently to maximize the global food production (Disclaimer: it is HBO's John Oliver, so there is some language and references that might not be appropriate for all audiences). 

 

Tags: food, agriculture, consumption, sustainability, video, unit 5 agriculture.

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, August 6, 2015 4:20 AM

Food waste is a tragedy that we all know happens, but the economic system does not work efficiently to maximize the global food production (Disclaimer: it is HBO's John Oliver, so there is some language and references that might not be appropriate for all audiences). 


Tags: food, agriculture, consumption, sustainability, video, unit 5 agriculture.

Sue Byrnes's curator insight, August 6, 2015 6:06 PM

Food waste is a tragedy that we all know happens, but the economic system does not work efficiently to maximize the global food production (Disclaimer: it is HBO's John Oliver, so there is some language and references that might not be appropriate for all audiences). 

 

Tags: food, agriculture, consumption, sustainability, video, unit 5 agriculture.

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Cityscapes of Chicago

Cityscape Chicago II is a personal timelapse piece that I have worked on periodically over the past two years. The inspiration behind the project ties similarly with the original piece. As the city of Chicago continues to change, my fascination with it grows as well. The goal for me is always to capture the city in a unique way from new perspectives, and to continue exploring it.

 

Tags: Chicago, urban, place, landscape,  video.


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 12, 2014 8:08 AM

A little closer to my home and workplace, here is a similar video about Providence, Rhode Island.

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International Migration

Almost everywhere on the world, international migration is a hot topic. Most of the time the debate about migration is fierce and charged with prejudices and...

Via Natalie K Jensen, Nancy Watson, Seth Dixon
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Sierra_Mcswagger's curator insight, September 10, 2014 10:02 AM

This video is primarily talking on the widely known topic of migration. 3 percent of the worlds population is living away from there place of birth. The push of migration from places include poverty, war, and environmental disasters. The migration pull in some places are because of  economic opportunity, and political freedom. Migration is increasing, and is thought of as a bad thing.(s.s.)

Aurora Rider's curator insight, October 7, 2014 8:59 PM

This video is great for going over the many different aspects that go along with migration. It talks about what migration is and the reasons why people migrate known as push and pull factors. It talks about the different types of migration such as asylum seakers and illegal immigration. It mentions the disadvantages and advantages of migration.

Katelyn Sesny's curator insight, October 31, 2014 12:27 PM

A great YouTube video- discussing the controversy of international migration among other things that fall into place of the disapproval of international migration. -UNIT 2 

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Continent by continent, TEDGlobal talks

Continent by continent, TEDGlobal talks | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
Here, go around the world in less than 180 minutes with TEDGlobal talks.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 21, 2013 3:20 PM

I've linked various TED talks on this site; this playlist is a quick global tour feature some old favorites and ones that were new to me. 


Tags: TED, worldwide, and video.

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Where the Hell is Matt?


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 9, 2013 10:11 PM

I've seen other "Where the Hell is Matt" videos and this recent one is building on that tradition.  These videos show some fantastic international icons and people around the world.  Simultaneously, this video show the unique cultural elements seen around the world while showing the essential beauty of our common humanity.  Who wouldn't want to go to all the places that Matt has been? 


Tags: geo-inspiration, worldwide, folk culture.

GeoBlogs's curator insight, March 11, 2013 3:41 AM

Where can you send Matt ?

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The Struggle for Jihad

The Struggle for Jihad | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
Two opposing groups battle to define the word jihad on public buses and subways.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Kimberly Hordern's comment, April 30, 2013 8:07 AM
It is sad that these people are feeling the negative connotations of people who commit crimes under their own definition of the word jihad. When in actuality the word means to Islamic followers a personal struggle.
Conor McCloskey's comment, April 30, 2013 10:27 AM
Islamic cultural has been isolated and generalized in American society after September 11th, 2001. Because of this, the Islamic religion is often misunderstood or misrepresented. There are extremist factions of every religion, even Christian, though sometimes our culture forgets that. This video is about a Muslim organization that is trying to take back the definition of “jihad” in American society. Since 9/11, the world has been synonymous with violence, though many Muslims do not believe their struggle for a better life with God is a violent struggle.
Cultures are multilayer. While some Muslim’s believe jihad is a holy war, others see it as a personal struggle. American culture has a lot to learn about the Muslim cultures through out the world, including the differences between the extremist and non-extremist factions. Extremist factions tend to get the most press coverage and attention from outsiders because they are by name extreme. It would be interesting to see how this relationship with jihad would differ if September 11th never happened.
Zakary Pereira's comment, April 30, 2013 4:31 PM
Before seeing this video I had always thought of a Jihad as a religious war started by radical Muslims. After watching I felt bad personally that I had confused this word with something that many people hold as just a goal or a personal struggle for them. I do not know if it is because post-9/11 there was much anti-Islam and anti-muslim sentiment in the US (still are today) and that the word became a radical term in the United States, I don’t know. I agree with Conor and saying that the reason many people know Jihad as a religious war is because of the media attention that radical Islamists receive when they bomb/hurt/kill and that is hurting the image of Muslims and Jihad in America.
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Megacities Reflect Growing Urbanization Trend

Read the Transcript: http://to.pbs.org/b6sR86 The capital of the South Asian country Bangladesh, Dhaka, has a population that is booming. However, it stands ...

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Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 8:50 PM

To be a megacity like this, you have to conform to urbanization. There is no possible way to have such a populated and crowed city with farmlands around. This is a place of business yet residential areas, it also is where the marketplaces are and where kids go to school. Megacities need to be a part of an urban society in order for them to stay afloat.

Bec Seeto's curator insight, October 30, 2014 6:07 PM

This is a great introduction to the demographic explosion of the slums within megacities.  This is applicable to many themes within geography.   

Sarah Cannon's curator insight, December 14, 2015 10:20 AM

I can't image or even relate to the experience of living in a place like this. With rivers polluted right outside your house. And those rivers are what people bathe in and wash their clothes. I can't imagine not being able to access clean drinking water or lacking food. The people in Dhaka endure so much their whole lives, a good percentage of them will always live in poverty.

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The Global Food Waste Scandal

TED Talks Western countries throw out nearly half of their food, not because it’s inedible -- but because it doesn’t look appealing. Tristram Stuart delves into the shocking data of wasted food, calling for a more responsible use of global resources.

 

No one should be surprised that more developed societies are more wasteful societies.  It is not just personal wasting of food at the house and restaurants that are the problem.  Perfectly edible food is thrown out due to size (smaller than standards but perfectly normal), cosmetics (Bananas that are shaped 'funny') and costumer preference (discarded bread crust).  This is an intriguing perpective on our consumptive culture, but it also is helpful in framing issues such as sustainability and human and environmental interactions in a technologically advanced societies that are often removed form the land where the food they eat originates. 

 

Tags: food, agriculture, consumption, sustainability, TED, video, unit 5 agriculture.


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Kenny Dominguez's curator insight, November 29, 2013 6:13 PM

Ted explains it well how we all waste perfectly good food that people would like to eat. Also it was amazing how much food was in the dumpsters that was just a day or week old. That meat could feed hundreds of people that are struggling to eat and all that meet to waste. 

megan b clement's curator insight, December 16, 2013 1:51 AM

Ted talks about just how wasteful our planet is. How we just ignore the issue and act like it will  not affect us in the future. When he shows you video and pictures of massive piles of the ends of a loaf of bread or all the food that Stop and Shop throws out because it does not "look" good for the customer. How every little bit of help counts you can try to make a little bit of an effort to be less wasteful. We have so much unnecessary waste. Like when he uses the example of how many people throw away the ends of a loaf of bread then he shows the waste of the ends of bread in massive piles it makes you sick. Especially with all of the hungry people in the world we need to be more resourceful.

 

 

Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 21, 2014 2:13 PM

No one should be surprised that more developed societies are more wasteful societies.  It is not just personal wasting of food at the house and restaurants that are the problem.  Perfectly edible food is thrown out due to size (smaller than standards but perfectly normal), cosmetics (Bananas that are shaped 'funny') and costumer preference (discarded bread crust).  This is an intriguing perceptive on our consumptive culture, but it also is helpful in framing issues such as sustainability and human and environmental interactions in a technologically advanced societies that are often removed form the land where the food they eat originates. 


Tags: food, agriculture, consumption, sustainability, TED, video, unit 5 agriculture.

Rescooped by Karen Moles Rose from Human Geography
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Geography Movies List

Geography Movies List | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it

If you are looking for suggestions for movies that have some geographic content, this is one teachers list (offered as an extra credit option) that is grouped by regions.  Some of these might best be shown as clips rather than the whole movie, but as always, these resources are designed for you to adapt to your own classroom needs as you deem necessary.  What are your favorite movies to show or recommend? 


Via Seth Dixon, Matthew Wahl
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