AP Human Geograph...
Follow
Find tag "urban"
620 views | +0 today
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Karen Moles Rose from Southmoore AP Human Geography
Scoop.it!

This Is The Next Generation Of Global Cities

This Is The Next Generation Of Global Cities | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
Cities in lower-income countries are rapidly catching up with the world's top business capitals, according to a new report.

Chicago-based consulting firm A.T. Kearney is predicting the next generation of global cities, based on the speed with whi...

Via Mr. David Burton
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Karen Moles Rose from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

The Most And Least Sprawling Cities In America

The Most And Least Sprawling Cities In America | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it

"Tracking changes in the shape of American cities over 10 years reveals which cities pack the most into a small space, but don't worry, sprawlers: Los Angeles shows you can change your fate."


Today’s nearly 314 million U.S. residents will expand to 401 million in less than 40 years. Wherever you fall on the cultural spectrum between country and city mouse, the fact remains that we simply won’t be able to use up resources the way we do now in sprawling suburbs shaped by car culture.  See also this infographic depicting those with the worst sprawl. 

 

Tags: density, sustainability, housing, urban, planning, unit 7 cities. 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Geofreak's curator insight, April 3, 1:35 PM

Ruimtelijk ordening, stedelijke gebieden

VS

L.Long's curator insight, April 15, 6:57 PM

Urban  Dynamics

Rescooped by Karen Moles Rose from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Dubai's Growth

Dubai's Growth | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon
more...
steve smith's curator insight, March 31, 4:03 AM

Great for tourism development

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, April 1, 10:48 AM

This series of pictures shows the extremely rapid growth of Dubai. An extremely wealthy city, the oil richness of Dubai has allowed for it to grow at an unprecedented rate from a desert to a sprawling metropolis. Such an impressive city springing up in a desolate desert speaks to how much resources can dictate where and how city growth occurs.

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 14, 5:13 PM

 Dubai has drastically changed throughtout it's time before the globalization boom and was one of the only cities to be impacted positively by globalization. As you can see from the depiction that Dubai in 1991 was a deserted place and then in 2005 it transformed into becoming somewhat of a city. In 2012 this city drastically transformed in order to help the globalization process and the whole city in general was trasformed into a mega city.

Rescooped by Karen Moles Rose from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

9 Reasons the U.S. Ended Up So Much More Car-Dependent Than Europe

9 Reasons the U.S. Ended Up So Much More Car-Dependent Than Europe | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
Understanding mistakes of the past can help guide U.S. transportation policy in the future.

 

In 2010, Americans drove for 85 percent of their daily trips, compared to car trip shares of 50 to 65 percent in Europe. Longer trip distances only partially explain the difference. Roughly 30 percent of daily trips are shorter than a mile on either side of the Atlantic. But of those under one-mile trips, Americans drove almost 70 percent of the time, while Europeans made 70 percent of their short trips by bicycle, foot, or public transportation.  The statistics don't reveal the sources of this disparity, but there are nine main reasons American metro areas have ended up so much more car-dependent than cities in Western Europe.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Tracy Galvin's curator insight, April 26, 3:49 PM

Since the US is at least four times larger than Europe it is difficult to compare the need for a vehicle between the two. Most of middle America is very spread out. We are fortunate that each person has more land available to them but that also means things are far apart. Creating more condensed "towns" that are essentially mini communities will help eliminate the need for cars in the US.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 2, 5:52 PM

The U.S. depends on cars to get everywhere. There is no arguing that the U.S. is more car dependents than dozens of other countries. Europe however, is in closer quarters to their working centers than the U.S. is. This is why and how Europe can depends on other methods of transportation such as bicycles to get them to work.

Paige Therien's curator insight, May 4, 1:46 PM

This is an interesting analyzation of how the U.S. and Europe became so different in terms of transportation methods.  In my personal experience, the U.S. is now so dependent on cars that there is a stigma in riding public transportation and bikers are seen as a nuisance.  In this article, the "Technological Focus" and its points  is relevant to many things outside of transportation and the U.S. strictly; the world needs to start thinking about behavior in order to make things better instead of developing new or better tools.

Rescooped by Karen Moles Rose from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Income inequality seen in satellite images from Google Earth

Income inequality seen in satellite images from Google Earth | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it

Nice visual on differences in income, with associated paper.  No stats needed here; a simple exploratory/observational curiosity is all you need.  A great starter for classroom discussions/lab activities. Start with this primer where you can see the distinct difference.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Christian Madison's curator insight, January 13, 7:28 PM

Well first of all I'd have to think on the bright side of life on the poor side. And on the other side, the rich side, I'd have to not take things for granted. On the poor side you'd have to use everything to it's limit and not waste a bit. While on the rich side it doesn't really matter that much.

Vivica Juarez's comment, January 13, 8:16 PM
@Sherryn Kottoor made some excellent points about the pictures. In the diagram, it shows the poor vs. the rich. It clearly proves how there is a big difference between the two. The rich have more access to things, that the poor don't. The poor are also not as fortunate when it comes to living and education.
Marcelle Searles's curator insight, January 25, 4:47 AM

useful for Year 8 and Year 11 Geography units.

Rescooped by Karen Moles Rose from AP Human Geography
Scoop.it!

The Burgess and Hoyt Models

The Burgess and Hoyt Models | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it

It is possible in many cities to identify zones with a particular type of land use - eg a residential zone. Often these zones have developed due to a combination of economic and social factors. In some cases planners may have tried to separate out some land uses, eg an airport is separated from a large housing estate.

 

The concentric and sector models in one news article?  The BBC is showing once again the possibilities available if only the United States taught more geography in the schools. 

 

Tags: urban, models, unit 7 cities, APHG.


Via Seth Dixon, Matthew Wahl, Mrs.Dias
more...
Sally Egan's curator insight, June 25, 2013 7:50 PM

Useful to develop understanding of the models of urban landuse zones within cities.

Rescooped by Karen Moles Rose from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

17th century London visualized

"Six students from De Montfort University have created a stellar 3D representation of 17th century London, as it existed before The Great Fire of 1666. The three-minute video provides a realistic animation of Tudor London, and particularly a section called Pudding Lane where the fire started. As Londonist notes, “Although most of the buildings are conjectural, the students used a realistic street pattern [taken from historical maps] and even included the hanging signs of genuine inns and businesses” mentioned in diaries from the period."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
harish magan's comment, November 6, 2013 1:02 PM
Great Source for studies.
Tony Aguilar's curator insight, November 8, 2013 2:53 AM

London in the 1700's was a chacterised by buildings that were very tighly packed together with obviously little fire code. There buildings are similiar to other communities thrughout Europe and areas in Switzerland. This remake of the past gives the student an animated journey into an  England that once was before the fire. It appears preindustrial revolution and shows how the economy was run by individual businesses and markets, its always interesting to look into the past and see the way the same cities exist today. Most importantly we learn and have the best fire codes possible

Steven Flis's curator insight, December 16, 2013 11:24 AM

For someone who loves history as much as i do this was a real treat. It honest makes you feel as if you could hop on a plane and travel there right now. Also as someone who has walked the streets of london you can see glimpses of these times within the architechture and the city planning. Great video really makes me nostalgic for a time in which was way before myself.

Rescooped by Karen Moles Rose from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Detroit on the edge

Detroit on the edge | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
Bob Simon reports on the decline of America's former industrial capital and the people determined to bring it back

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 16, 2013 8:32 PM

Detroit is the largest city to declare bankruptcy and more importantly the first major American city to essentially fail as a major metropolitan area.  Sections of the city are reminiscent of a post-apocalyptic bestselling novel:  80,000 buildings stand empty, 40% of the streetlights don’t work, and it routinely takes police one hour to respond to a 911 call.


Tags: urban, economic, industry, Detroit

Gregory S Sankey Jr.'s curator insight, November 19, 2013 12:21 PM

The Detroit "Renaissance"  is an interesting one to say the least. There is an obvious opportunity to lay the foundations for something new and bold after clearing the rubble that has become detroit. But who is going to be displaced once the rubble's cleared and the trendy cafes, art studios, and co-ops are erected? Who amongst the poor and already displaced will be held up high, encouraged, and supported to help create this new Detroit? Cutting costs from health care and pensions, from those who already live in this city and are struggling, doesn't sound particularly productive. Especially after referencing having posession of extremely valuable art pieces that could be sold off. This article really sheds a light on the pro's and con's that are associated in capital investment in a bankrupt and wartorn American city.

I don't think that the poor and hungry care about paint on a canvas. They need access to opportunity and the resources to seize it.

 

Rescooped by Karen Moles Rose from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

An Insider's View Of 19th-Century Paris

An Insider's View Of 19th-Century Paris | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it

"Charles Marville photographed Paris' transition from medieval hodgepodge to modern metropolis.  Marville made more than 425 photographs of the narrow streets and crumbling buildings of premodern Paris, including this view from the top of Rue Champlain in 1877-1878."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 1, 2013 12:34 PM

This NPR podcast adds some great insight into Charles Marville's 19th century photography currently on display at the National Gallery of Art in Washington D.C.  The urban transformations designed by Haussmann made Paris the global capital of modernity and the many cities around the world copied the principles of Haussmannization.  A photographic glimpse into Paris before and during these changes that brought about social upheaval is a marvelous tool for an historical geographic analysis of urbanization.  

   

Tags: urban, historical, Paris, placeFrancepodcastimages.

Kevin Barker's comment, October 6, 2013 11:38 AM
Little blurb at the top of the link for the gallery :) "Notice: During the federal government shutdown, the offices and all premises of the National Gallery of Art and its Sculpture Garden are closed to the public, and all public programs are canceled. Employees will not have access to their e-mail or voicemail accounts during the shutdown."
Rescooped by Karen Moles Rose from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

These Interactive Maps Compare 19th Century American Cities to Today

These Interactive Maps Compare 19th Century American Cities to Today | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it

" The Smithsonian Magazine recently dipped into David Rumsey's collection of over 150,000 maps to find some of the best representations of American cities over the past couple hundred years. With some simple programming, they were able to overlay images of vintage maps of some major cities onto satellite images from today. The results are fascinating."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Tom cockburn's comment, September 20, 2013 5:09 PM
Absolutely agree,Marian!
Amy Marques's curator insight, February 6, 5:09 PM

These maps are a great way to see what North American cities used to look like in comparison to what they are now. Some great transformations are Chicago and NYC.

Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's curator insight, May 29, 11:56 AM

The Smithsonian Magazine overlayed maps of American cities for the past centuries with modern satellite images to show differences in the development and planning and the growth of the cities.

The growth and change of the cities changed over the years on how it was achieved and how far it could be expanded due to new technology and movement of people to urban areas. The technology helped achieved a certain hold over the environment to build more urban spaces. 

Rescooped by Karen Moles Rose from green streets
Scoop.it!

Cities Threatened By Climate Change

Cities Threatened By Climate Change | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
It's not just flooding: Plenty of other issues—such as rising sea levels and drought—present pressing problems for these urban areas.

Climate change is one of the most serious issues facing the world's cities in the 21st century, but so far policymakers, planners, and scientists have come up with few solutions to prevent—or mitigate—its calamitous effects.

While flooding disasters like Hurricanes Katrina and Sandy have brought attention to the dangers posed by stronger storms, there are plenty of other threats—such as rising sea levels—that might be even more pressing. Wildfires and drought have already heavily damaged the American Southwest, while flooding threatens low-lying island nations.

Visit the link to find which cities that will soon be in danger.


Via Lauren Moss
more...
Anhony DeSimone's curator insight, December 19, 2013 8:56 AM

This article explains the effects of the climate change has on the city. This shows us that the climate controls the physical setting of a city and if any changes are made in the climate that means that the city will also change with it. In some cases this can dangerous and cause harm to a cities landmark or physical geography. Some issues that are concerning about this is flooding's, hurricane's, and other strong storms.

Rescooped by Karen Moles Rose from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Want to Get High-Skill Immigration Right? Think About Detroit

Want to Get High-Skill Immigration Right? Think About Detroit | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
Rust Belt cities are hoping that immigrants can help rebuild our their shrinking communities. Washington should gear policy to helping them.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Mark E. Deschaine, PhD's curator insight, May 16, 2013 9:44 PM

Not tech .... But we are impacted in Michigan .....

Nganguem Victor's curator insight, June 3, 2013 8:07 AM

j'aime ça

Rescooped by Karen Moles Rose from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

New York's Changing Skyline

New York's Changing Skyline | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 26, 2013 3:55 PM

I love this visualization of New York City's evolving skyline from 1876-2013.  The urban landscape of America's prominent cities has changed dramatically. 


Tags: historical,urbanarchitecture, landscape, NYC.

Louis Culotta's comment, May 1, 2013 11:32 AM
I wonder if the tallest building in the first picture is the first stage of the Brooklyn Bridge??????
Louis Culotta's curator insight, May 1, 2013 11:35 AM

if you look at the first picture...it looks like the tall building on the water could be the first stage of the Brooklyn Bridge...any suggestions to this?

Rescooped by Karen Moles Rose from AP Human Geography
Scoop.it!

The Growth of Megacities

The Growth of Megacities | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it

"For the first time in human history, more of the world’s 6.8 billion people live in cities than in rural areas. That is an incredible demographic and geographic shift since 1950 when only 30 percent of the world’s 2.5 billion inhabitants lived in urban environments.

 

The world’s largest cities, particularly in developing countries, are growing at phenomenal rates. As a growing landless class is attracted by urban opportunities, meager as they might be, these cities’ populations are ballooning to incredible numbers.

 

A May 2010 Christian Science Monitor article on “megacities” predicted that by 2050, almost 70 percent of the world’s estimated 10 billion people—more than the number of people living today—will reside in urban areas. The social, economic and environmental problems associated with a predominantly urbanized population are considerably different from those of the mostly rural world population of the past."


Via Seth Dixon, Matthew Wahl, Mr. Gresham
more...
Arya Okten's curator insight, March 27, 10:23 PM

Unit VII

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, April 28, 10:40 AM

unit 7

Whitney Souery's curator insight, May 28, 6:48 PM

The majority of megacities are in the developing world, with the exception of places like New York and Tokyo, best showing how the face of the world is changing. Developing countries are on their paths to becoming major powers, such as Calkutta for example. As an enlarging city, more and more citizens are flocking to the abundance of jobs in the city which thus increases India's development as a result of the growing city and thus leads to a cycle of growth as demand for more jobs increases as the city grows. Megacities are thus a symbol of the developing world and can be used in human geography as symbols of development. 

Rescooped by Karen Moles Rose from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

In Pictures: Crackdown in Brazil's favelas

In Pictures: Crackdown in Brazil's favelas | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
The Brazilian government's 'pacification' initiative has led to drug busts and shootouts in Rio's favelas.

 

Just a few months before Rio de Janeiro welcomes visitors for the World Cup, and two years before it hosts the Olympics, security within the city remains a major issue.  The government currently promotes the policy of "pacification", where security forces engage in raids, drug busts, and even gunfights with suspected gang members. This pacification policy is supposed to pave the way for the development of long-neglected favelas in Rio, Brazil's second-biggest city and home to 11 million people.  However, many of the favelas remain in the hands of an army of drug dealers and criminals who are not willing to step down or be pacified.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Rescooped by Karen Moles Rose from Mrs. Watson's Class
Scoop.it!

Our future in cities

Our future in cities | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
Humanity's future is the future of cities. Explore the crowded favelas, greened-up blocks and futuristic districts that could shape the future of cities -- and take a profane, hilarious side trip to the suburbs.

Via Nancy Watson
more...
Nancy Watson's curator insight, March 5, 8:08 PM

Cities are changing the world at a rapid rate.

Rescooped by Karen Moles Rose from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Historical Metropolitan Populations of the United States

Historical Metropolitan Populations of the United States | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it

"The graph and tables on this page attempt to show how the urban hierarchy of the United States has developed over time. The statistic used here is the population of the metropolitan area (contiguous urbanized area surrounding a central city), not the population of an individual city. Metropolitan area population is much more useful than city population as an indicator of the size and importance of a city, since the official boundaries of a city are usually arbitrary and often do not include vast suburban areas. For example, in 2000 San Antonio was the 10th largest city in the U.S., larger than Boston or San Francisco, but its Metro Area was only ranked about 30th. The same thing was happening even back in 1790: New York was the biggest single city, but Philadelphia plus its suburbs of Northern Liberties and Southwark made it the biggest metro area."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Albert Jordan's curator insight, January 30, 2:56 PM

While the Northeast has typically been the ringleader for population centers in America, rising costs of living and population density has been pushing people out into other parts of the country. Along with that, discoveries of natural resources westward help incentivize people to move. Evidenced by the rise of San Fransisco, the settling of Alaska, the oil rich fields of West Texas, and the fertile lands of the mid-west to name a few. While these are early examples from the beginnings of America, even today we find these same reasons for the push out of the Northeast. With the new discoveries of resources in the Dakotas and the cost of living being so much cheaper in the South and especially in the major cities of Texas, where a house with a yard can cost half of what it does here in Rhode Island minus the lawn. The usefulness of a city and region plays a role in its population rise or decline as well. Take for example, Newport, RI in 1810 was listed as #13 being that it was a major transportation and shipping hub. Today, I would be very surprised if it was in the top 150. As the country expanded and other ports of entry were established, economic forces adapted. Sometimes this was for the better, such as the port of Los Angeles or for the worse, such as Detroit’s decline. Advances in technology make communication and transportation incredibly efficient and what was at one a cultural identity for some places to be a hub of manufacturing or shipping or what have you now become a global enterprise with perhaps a call center in India, a factory in Mexico, and a global HQ in Delaware. Because of Globalization, no longer does one metropolis have to be king of all and instead, a small town can provide tax breaks for a technology company even though none of the real production gets done in that locale due to cheap labor being half way across the world. People will move according to their needs and accessibility to those needs, and if what they need to survive are no longer accessible in location A, then they will move to location B, C, or X - if need be.

Paige Therien's curator insight, February 3, 11:29 AM

This information is a helpful illustrator for someone who knows about the geography and history of the United States.  It is important to note the use of "metropolitan populations" rather than "city populations" within particular city borders; as the creator states, "boundaries of a city are usually arbitrary".  In other words, the information that can be given from a "city" do not tell the whole story.  Metropolitan areas, even if spanning out of city borders, share similar local culture dynamics, industry, and infrastructure as the core city.  If one was to just examine the cities and not the entire metropolitan areas of the Northeast Megalopolis, they would be missing a huge part of the puzzle. Depending on the time period, the demanded resources, and the available technologies heavily influence how metropoloitan areas work, grow, and interact with others.   This can be seen in the charts and tables.  For example, the availability of the automobile and other transportation methods deeply affected how people and industry move and how metropolitan areas influence and interact with one another.

Jess Deady's curator insight, April 17, 10:26 AM

Comparing and contrasting numbers is a huge part of todays world. Looking at this chart, it indicates the size of the population of the whole metropolitan area. The difference in size of cities and of areas differs greatly and the examples provided can show how the area of a city is different that its Metro Area ranking.

Rescooped by Karen Moles Rose from green streets
Scoop.it!

The 11 Most Resilient Cities In America

The 11 Most Resilient Cities In America | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
The Rockefeller Foundation's resiliency challenge will give 11 American cities support to improve their ability to bounce back from disaster.

As more of the world's population moves into urban areas, and climate change increases the likelihood of flooding and extreme weather, cities all over the globe will need to strengthen their ability to withstand disasters.

This year, the Rockefeller Foundation is giving a few lucky cities a push with its 100 Resilient Cities challenge, which aims to give metropolises support to design and implement disaster contingency plans.


Via Lauren Moss
more...
ParadigmGallery's curator insight, December 5, 2013 3:52 PM

Interesting , informative post....

By nature, a city's ability to weather disaster is a design issue, one with plenty of potential for design solutions.....

Rescooped by Karen Moles Rose from AP Human GeographyNRHS
Scoop.it!

The End of the Nation-State?

The End of the Nation-State? | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
With rapid urbanization under way, cities want to call their own shots. Increasingly, they can.

Via Seth Dixon, Karen Moles Rose
more...
Tony Aguilar's curator insight, October 17, 2013 10:01 AM

The end of Soverign nation states has alot to do with how interact with other states into a more integrated regional economy. The global community is realizing its importance of woking together to mazimize on trade and technology building as an economic world effort. This would blur the lines of independent soverign countires and bring regions together for economic puprposes even redrawing regional lines. Cities want more autonomy on responding to urbanization and move more away from being identified as a nation state. It is the desire to listen less to what washington has to say and act more as an independent state which makes more decisons with the regions around it to mazimize on rapid city growth and the money making opportunities that a re created from a rapidly changing global community.

Keileem's comment, October 17, 2013 3:41 PM
Just end reading a book: the end of the nation state, but than in mind a non-democratic eu government.
Emma Boyle's curator insight, November 20, 2013 8:31 AM

Good examples: NYC, Washington DC, Brasilia, Hong Kong, London, and many more.

Rescooped by Karen Moles Rose from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

A New Type of Growing City

A New Type of Growing City | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it

“This is where the talent wants to live”


I believe there is a new class of city emerging across the country which are positioned to succeed in the coming decade – a class of city that has not yet been identified on a national scale. This city is a small/mid-sized regional center.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Mary Rack's curator insight, October 26, 2013 10:11 AM

Interesting idea - I wonder if it will take hold. Worth watching - 

Rescooped by Karen Moles Rose from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

The End of the Nation-State?

The End of the Nation-State? | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
With rapid urbanization under way, cities want to call their own shots. Increasingly, they can.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Tony Aguilar's curator insight, October 17, 2013 10:01 AM

The end of Soverign nation states has alot to do with how interact with other states into a more integrated regional economy. The global community is realizing its importance of woking together to mazimize on trade and technology building as an economic world effort. This would blur the lines of independent soverign countires and bring regions together for economic puprposes even redrawing regional lines. Cities want more autonomy on responding to urbanization and move more away from being identified as a nation state. It is the desire to listen less to what washington has to say and act more as an independent state which makes more decisons with the regions around it to mazimize on rapid city growth and the money making opportunities that a re created from a rapidly changing global community.

Keileem's comment, October 17, 2013 3:41 PM
Just end reading a book: the end of the nation state, but than in mind a non-democratic eu government.
Emma Boyle's curator insight, November 20, 2013 8:31 AM

Good examples: NYC, Washington DC, Brasilia, Hong Kong, London, and many more.

Rescooped by Karen Moles Rose from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Vegan food truck makes rounds in 'food deserts'

Vegan food truck makes rounds in 'food deserts' | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
Baruch Ben-Yehudah is tackling Prince George’s County’s "food desert" problem. His vegan food truck delivers nourishment to neighborhoods lacking fresh groceries.

Via Natalie K Jensen, Seth Dixon
more...
nicole Musset's curator insight, September 14, 2013 1:55 PM

la terre peut offrir de la nourriture à tous ses habitants;mais les interets personnels,la recherche de profits et l'absence de plus en plus grande de conscience "écolologique"....une personne comme Baruch Ben Yehuda est tres importante pour ceux qui souffrent du manque de ressources.

Patricia Stitson's curator insight, September 20, 2013 10:38 PM

After having just driven across country this year I am very in touch with the fact that this model needs to be replicated across the US.

Gregory S Sankey Jr.'s curator insight, October 24, 2013 1:03 PM

This food truck is bringing healthy, vegan food, to food deserts. A food desert is a place where healthy food is not accesable to the population, which is always impoverished. These people typically rely on unhealthy/cheap foods that are high in fats, preservatives, and sugars. This leads to tremendous health issues for these populations. Sure, this food truck is making a profit but it is also providing a wonderful service to the community, exposure to healthy foods and an alternative to the norm.

Rescooped by Karen Moles Rose from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Picture quiz – do you know your world cities?

Picture quiz – do you know your world cities? | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it
Some city skylines are so iconic they are instantly recognisable.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
harish magan's comment, September 10, 2013 7:09 AM
It is very interesting to explore new cities and their sky views
Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 12, 2013 12:41 PM

After taking this quiz I realized I could not really identify most of these cities. I could tell some of them were European from the look of the buildings. I also thought a few more were cities in the United States but there was only Dallas. In my opinion these cities are even more spectacular than some of our major cities. 

Lorettayoung's curator insight, May 8, 8:36 PM

is this ularu ?

Rescooped by Karen Moles Rose from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Can You Name These Cities by Their Starbucks Locations?

Can You Name These Cities by Their Starbucks Locations? | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it

"Can you recognize it by its Starbucks locations?  Let’s find out. This quiz shows all of the Starbucks locations within the city boundaries of 20 domestic or foreign cities, and for each you must name the city depicted from four choices."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 24, 2013 1:19 PM

This is my favorite place-based guessing game since GeoGuessr (5 locations in GoogleMaps "StreetView" and you have to guess where).  This isn't about knowing Starbucks locations, but understanding spatial urban economic patterns (just as this article showing the locations where McDonald's and Burger King will place stores also relies of understanding urban economic patterns).  In this Starbucks game you have to recognized the shape of the city, major street patterns and the economic patterns just to name a few.  This is one way to make the urban model more relevant.       


Tags: urbanmodels, economic, trivia.

Courtney Burns's curator insight, November 24, 2013 6:53 PM

Unfortuntaley I wasn't very good at this game. I believe I ended up getting 5 answers correct. However what was intersting about this article was to see how each starbucks was placed in certain areas. There were so much more starbucks locations in city areas. The starbucks' also typically were off of main highways or corners. This is for similiar reasons to what we dicussed about dunkin donuts in class. People are only going to travel so far for coffee. If it is not convienent then people will go else where. It is not like car dealership where people will drive out of their way to look. For a coffee people on average may drive 5 minutes. Anything too out of the way people will avoid. That is why there are so many starbucks and dunkins so close to eachother. They are set up equdistant from each other in locations that are convient for people around the area to try and get them to choose their coffee. It is typical to put a coffee shop on the main roads like we see in the maps, as well as in numerous locations to convience the whole area. The more convient the shop the more money they will make. That is why there are some many locations so close to each other. It is interesting to see it visually on a map just how many locations there actually are. 

Rescooped by Karen Moles Rose from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Stray Dogs Master Moscow Subway

Stray Dogs Master Moscow Subway | AP Human GeographyNRHS | Scoop.it

"Every so often, if you ride Moscow's crowded subways, you may notice that the commuters around you include a dog - a stray dog, on its own, just using the handy underground Metro to beat the traffic and get from A to B.  Yes, some of Moscow's stray dogs have figured out how to use the city's immense and complex subway system, getting on and off at their regular stops."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, February 18, 11:25 PM

This article shows how intelligent some dogs are. They are adapting to the environment around them and figuring out how to survive within the city. I give them credit, as I am sure they have their tactics to survive, whether its begging for food or traveling subways to look for food. 

Jess Deady's curator insight, April 30, 8:46 PM

Dogs are creatures of habit. They get on at one stop and off at another every day or every so often. This is because there is an abundance of stray dogs and since no one is taking them in, Moscow will continue to have interesting subway surfers among them.

Paige Therien's curator insight, May 4, 11:06 AM

Humans commonly think of themselves as separate from nature.  However, we very much are a part of it and animals, like these stray dogs, know it.  When dealing with something more powerful than yourself, you have to learn how to navigate the system in order to survive.  That is exactly what these dogs have done, literally and figuratively, by learning the complex subway systems in Moscow.  It is an example of how animals can adapt to their man-made surroundings and how persistent (the rest of) nature can be.